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Ceritinib

Class: Antineoplastic Agents
- ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors
- Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Inhibitors
- Kinase Inhibitors
- Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors
- Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors
VA Class: AN900
Chemical Name: 5-Chloro-N2-{5-methyl-4-(piperidin-4-yl)-2-[(propan-2-yl)oxy]phenyl}-N4-[2-(propane-2-sulfonyl)phenyl]pyrimidine-2,4-diamine
Molecular Formula: C28H36ClN5O3S
CAS Number: 1032900-25-6
Brands: Zykadia

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jan 25, 2021.

Introduction

Antineoplastic agent; an inhibitor of several receptor tyrosine kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK).1 2 3

Uses for Ceritinib

Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

Treatment of metastatic NSCLC in patients whose cancer is ALK-positive as detected by an FDA-approved diagnostic test (e.g., Ventana ALK [D5F3] CDx assay)1 2 3 43 (designated an orphan drug by FDA for this use).4

Ceritinib Dosage and Administration

General

  • Confirmation of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC is necessary prior to initiation of therapy.1 (See Non-small Cell Lung Cancer [NSCLC] under Uses.)

  • Fewer dosage reductions and reduced incidence and severity of adverse GI effects with ceritinib 450 mg daily with food compared with ceritinib 750 mg daily administered in a fasted state.1 46 (See GI Toxicity under Cautions.)

Administration

Oral Administration

Administer orally once daily with food.1 (See Food under Pharmacokinetics.)

If a dose of ceritinib is missed, do not take the missed dose within 12 hours of the next dose.1 (See Advice to Patients.)

If a dose of ceritinib is vomited, do not take an extra dose.1 Take the next dose at the regularly scheduled time.1

Dosage

Adults

NSCLC
Oral

450 mg once daily.1 Continue therapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurs.1

Avoid concomitant use of potent CYP3A inhibitors.1 If concomitant use cannot be avoided, reduce ceritinib dosage by approximately 33% and round dosage to nearest 150-mg strength of ceritinib capsules or tablets (e.g., from 450 mg daily to 300 mg daily).1

Dosage Modification for Toxicity
Oral

Dosing interruption, dosage reduction, and/or discontinuance of therapy may be necessary for adverse reactions.1

If dosage reduction is required, reduce dosage as described in Table 1.1

Table 1: Recommended Dosage Reduction for Ceritinib Toxicity1

Dose Reduction Level

Dosage Reduction after Recovery from Toxicity (Initial Dosage = 450 mg once daily)

First

Resume at 300 mg once daily

Second

Resume at 150 mg once daily

Third

Permanently discontinue drug

GI Toxicity
Oral

If severe or intolerable nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea occurs despite optimal antiemetics or antidiarrheal therapy, interrupt therapy until GI toxicity improves, and then resume at next lower dosage.1 (See Table 1.)

Hepatic Toxicity
Oral

If ALT or AST concentrations >5 times ULN with total bilirubin concentrations ≤2 times ULN occur, interrupt therapy.1 When liver function tests return to baseline or ≤3 times ULN, may resume at next lower dosage.1 (See Table 1.)

If ALT or AST concentrations >3 times ULN with total bilirubin concentrations >2 times ULN occur without cholestasis or hemolysis, permanently discontinue drug.1

Interstitial Lung Disease/Pneumonitis
Oral

If treatment-related interstitial lung disease/pneumonitis of any grade occurs, permanently discontinue drug.1 (See Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)/Pneumonitis under Cautions.)

Prolongation of QT Interval
Oral

If QTc interval >500 msec on ≥2 separate ECGs occurs, interrupt therapy.1 Once QTc interval improves to <481 msec or returns to baseline (if baseline QTc interval ≥481 msec), may resume at next lower dosage.1 If QTc-interval prolongation recurs, reduce dosage by one dosage level.1 (See Table 1.)

If QTc-interval prolongation occurs concurrently with torsades de pointes, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, or signs and/or symptoms of serious arrhythmia, permanently discontinue drug.1 (See Prolongation of QT Interval under Cautions.)

Bradycardia
Oral

If symptomatic, but non-life-threatening, bradycardia occurs, interrupt therapy until recovery to asymptomatic bradycardia or to a heart rate of ≥60 beats/minute.1 If no concomitant drugs known to cause bradycardia are identified, may resume ceritinib at next lower dosage.1 (See Table 1 and also see Interactions.)

If clinically important bradycardia requiring intervention or life-threatening bradycardia occurs in patients receiving concomitant drugs known to cause bradycardia or hypotension, interrupt therapy until recovery to asymptomatic bradycardia or to a heart rate of ≥60 beats/minute.1 If such concomitant drugs are discontinued or dosage adjusted, may resume ceritinib at next lower dosage with frequent monitoring.1 (See Table 1.)

If life-threatening bradycardia occurs in patients not receiving concomitant drugs known to cause bradycardia or hypotension, permanently discontinue drug.1 (See Bradycardia under Cautions.)

Hyperglycemia
Oral

If persistent hyperglycemia with serum glucose concentrations >250 mg/dL occurs despite optimal antidiabetic agent therapy, interrupt therapy.1 Once adequate control of hyperglycemia is achieved, may resume ceritinib at next lower dosage.1 (See Table 1.) If hyperglycemia persists despite optimal medical management, discontinue ceritinib.1 (See Hyperglycemia under Cautions.)

Pancreatitis
Oral

If serum lipase or amylase concentration >2 times ULN occurs, interrupt therapy.1 When serum concentrations improve to <1.5 times ULN, may resume ceritinib at next lower dosage.1 (See Table 1.) (See Pancreatitis under Cautions.)

Special Populations

Hepatic Impairment

Possible increased exposure to ceritinib.1

Severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class C): Reduce daily dosage by approximately 33%; round dosage to nearest 150-mg strength of ceritinib capsules or tablets (e.g., from 450 mg daily to 300 mg daily).1 (See Hepatic Impairment under Cautions.)

Mild or moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class A or B): Dosage adjustment not necessary.1

Renal Impairment

No specific dosage recommendations.1 (See Renal Impairment under Cautions.)

Geriatric Patients

No specific dosage recommendations.1 (See Geriatric Use under Cautions.)

Cautions for Ceritinib

Contraindications

  • Manufacturer states none known.1

Warnings/Precautions

GI Toxicity

Severe GI toxicity has occurred.1

Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain occurred in 95% of patients receiving ceritinib (750 mg once daily in a fasted state) in clinical trials, including severe cases reported in 14% of the patients.1 Permanent discontinuance of ceritinib therapy or dosage modification (i.e., temporary interruption of therapy, dosage reduction) was necessary in 1.6 or 36%, respectively, of ceritinib-treated patients.1

Incidence and severity of GI adverse effects were reduced in patients receiving ceritinib 450 mg once daily with food.1 Among patients receiving ceritinib 450 mg once daily with food, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain occurred in 76% of patients; 51% of these cases were grade 1 in severity.1

Monitor for GI toxicity and treat appropriately (e.g., antidiarrhea agents, antiemetics, fluid replacement) as necessary.1 Temporary interruption followed by dosage reduction or discontinuance of ceritinib may be necessary depending on severity of the GI toxicity.1 (See GI Toxicity under Dosage and Administration.)

Hepatic Toxicity

Drug-induced hepatotoxicity has occurred.1 ALT or AST elevations >5 times ULN reported in 28 or 16%, respectively, of patients receiving ceritinib 750 mg once daily in a fasting state.1 Elevations in ALT >3 times ULN and total bilirubin >2 times ULN with alkaline phosphatase <2 times ULN reported in 0.3% of ceritinib-treated patients.1 Permanent discontinuance of the drug was necessary in approximately 1% of patients.1

Monitor liver function tests (i.e., ALT, AST, total bilirubin) monthly and as clinically indicated.1 More frequent repeat testing necessary in patients who develop transaminase elevations.1

If hepatic toxicity occurs, temporary interruption followed by dosage reduction or discontinuance of therapy may be necessary depending on the severity.1 (See Hepatic Toxicity under Dosage and Administration.)

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)/Pneumonitis

Severe, life-threatening, or fatal ILD/pneumonitis may occur.1 In clinical trials evaluating ceritinib 750 mg once daily, ILD/pneumonitis occurred in 2.4% of patients receiving the drug in a fasting state; grade 3 or 4 ILD/pneumonitis occurred in 1.3% of patients and fatal ILD/pneumonitis occurred in 0.2% of patients.1 Permanent discontinuance of therapy was necessary in 10 patients (1.1%).1

Monitor patients for pulmonary symptoms indicative of ILD or pneumonitis (see Advice to Patients).1 Exclude other potential causes of ILD or pneumonitis.1 In patients diagnosed with treatment-related ILD or pneumonitis, permanently discontinue ceritinib.1 (See Interstitial Lung Disease/Pneumonitis under Dosage and Administration.)

Prolongation of QT Interval

QTc-interval prolongation reported; may increase risk for ventricular arrhythmias (e.g., torsades de pointes) or sudden death.1 The prolongation appears to occur in a plasma concentration-dependent manner.1

Avoid use in patients with congenital long QT syndrome when possible.1

Periodically monitor ECGs and serum electrolytes in patients with CHF, bradyarrhythmias, or electrolyte abnormalities or during concomitant use of drugs known to prolong the QT interval.1 (See Specific Drugs and Foods under Interactions.)

If QTc-interval prolongation occurs, temporary interruption followed by dosage reduction or permanent discontinuance of ceritinib may be necessary.1 (See Prolongation of QT Interval under Dosage and Administration.)

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia reported.1 Increased risk of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes or glucose intolerance and in those receiving corticosteroids.1

Monitor fasting serum glucose concentrations prior to initiation of therapy, during therapy and as clinically indicated.1 Initiate or optimize antidiabetic agents as clinically indicated.1 Temporary interruption followed by dosage reduction or discontinuance of therapy may be necessary depending on severity of hyperglycemia.1 (See Hyperglycemia under Dosage and Administration.)

Bradycardia

Bradycardia reported.1

Avoid use in patients receiving other drugs known to cause bradycardia when possible.1 (See Interactions.)

Monitor heart rate and BP regularly in all patients receiving ceritinib.1 If bradycardia occurs, temporary interruption followed by dosage reduction or discontinuance of therapy may be necessary.1 (See Cardiovascular Toxicity under Dosage and Administration.)

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis, sometimes fatal, reported.1

Monitor serum lipase and amylase concentrations prior to initiation of therapy, periodically during therapy, and as clinically indicated.1 Temporary interruption followed by dosage reduction or discontinuance of therapy may be necessary depending on severity of toxicity.1 (See Pancreatitis under Dosage and Administration.)

Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality

May cause fetal harm; teratogenicity, embryotoxicity, fetotoxicity, and embryolethality demonstrated in animals.1

Avoid pregnancy during therapy.1 Perform pregnancy test prior to initiation of ceritinib in women of reproductive potential.1 Women of reproductive potential should use effective methods of contraception while receiving the drug and for 6 months after the drug is discontinued.1 Men who are partners of such women should use effective contraceptive methods during therapy and for 3 months after the drug is discontinued.1 If used during pregnancy or if the patient becomes pregnant during therapy, apprise of potential fetal hazard.1

Specific Populations

Pregnancy

May cause fetal harm.1 (See Fetal/Neonatal Morbidity and Mortality under Cautions.)

Lactation

Not known whether ceritinib or its metabolites are distributed into human milk or if drug has any effect on milk production or the nursing infant.1 Women should not breast-feed during therapy and for 2 weeks after discontinuance of the drug.1

Pediatric Use

Safety and efficacy not established in pediatric patients.1

Geriatric Use

In clinical trials evaluating ceritinib 750 mg once daily in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, 18% of patients were ≥65 years of age and 5% were ≥75 years of age.1 No overall differences in safety or efficacy in patients ≥65 years of age compared with younger adults.1

Hepatic Impairment

Increased systemic exposure in individuals with severe hepatic impairment who received a single 750-mg dose of ceritinib; dosage reduction necessary.1 (See Special Populations under Pharmacokinetics.)

Systemic exposure not altered by mild or moderate hepatic impairment; dosage adjustment not necessary in such patients.1

Renal Impairment

Exposure not altered by mild or moderate renal impairment.1 (See Special Populations under Pharmacokinetics.)

Not studied in patients with severe renal impairment (Clcr <30 mL/minute).1

Common Adverse Effects

Previously untreated ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC: Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, decreased appetite, cough, weight loss, chest pain (noncardiac), pruritus, pyrexia, headache, esophageal disorder (including dyspepsia, GERD, and dysphagia), pain (including musculoskeletal, extremity), QT-interval prolongation, elevated concentrations of ALT and/or AST, elevated concentrations of γ-glutamyltransferase (e.g., GGT), elevated concentrations of alkaline phosphatase, elevated Scr concentrations, hypophosphatemia, elevated lipase concentrations, hyperbilirubinemia.1

Previously treated ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC: Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, constipation, esophageal disorder (including dyspepsia, GERD, and dysphagia), fatigue, decreased appetite, rash, anemia, elevated concentrations of ALT and/or AST, elevated Scr concentrations, hyperglycemia, hypophosphatemia, elevated lipase concentrations, hyperbilirubinemia.1

Interactions for Ceritinib

Metabolized principally by CYP3A.1 Substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro.1

May inhibit CYP isoenzymes 3A and 2C9 at clinically relevant concentrations; does not induce CYP isoenzymes 1A2, 2B6, or 2C9.6 Induces CYP3A4 in vitro.6

In vitro, not a substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 2, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 2, or organic anion transport protein (OATP) 1B1.1 Unlikely to inhibit P-gp, BCRP, MRP2, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, or OCT2 in vitro at clinically relevant concentrations.1

Drugs and Foods Affecting Hepatic Microsomal Enzymes

Potent CYP3A inhibitors: Possible pharmacokinetic interaction (increased systemic exposure to, and increased toxicity of, ceritinib).1 Avoid concomitant use.1 If concomitant use cannot be avoided, reduce daily dosage of ceritinib by approximately 33% and round to the nearest 150-mg strength (e.g., from 450 mg daily to 300 mg daily).1 If the potent CYP3A inhibitor is discontinued, resume ceritinib therapy at the dosage used prior to initiation of the potent CYP3A inhibitor.1

Potent CYP3A inducers: Possible pharmacokinetic interaction (decreased systemic exposure and decreased therapeutic efficacy of ceritinib).1 Avoid concomitant use.1

Drugs Metabolized by Hepatic Microsomal Enzymes

Substrates of CYP3A: Possible pharmacokinetic interaction (increased plasma concentrations of CYP3A substrate).1 Avoid concomitant use of ceritinib and CYP3A substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index or substrates primarily metabolized by CYP3A.1 If concomitant use of CYP3A substrates with a narrow therapeutic index cannot be avoided, consider dosage reduction of the CYP3A substrate.1

Substrates of CYP2C9: Possible pharmacokinetic interaction (increased plasma concentrations of CYP2C9 substrate).1 Avoid concomitant use of ceritinib and CYP2C9 substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index or substrates primarily metabolized by CYP2C9.1 If concomitant use of CYP2C9 substrates with a narrow therapeutic index cannot be avoided, consider dosage reduction of the CYP2C9 substrate.1

Inhibitors of P-gp

P-gp inhibitors: Potential pharmacokinetic interaction (increased plasma ceritinib concentrations).1

Drugs that Prolong QT Interval

Potential pharmacologic interaction (additive effect on QT-interval prolongation).1 Periodically monitor ECGs and electrolytes during concomitant use.1 (See Prolongation of QT Interval under Cautions.)

Drugs Associated with Bradycardia

Potential pharmacologic interaction (increased risk of bradycardia).1 Avoid concomitant use, if possible.1 (See Bradycardia under Cautions.)

Drugs Affecting Gastric Acidity

Potential pharmacokinetic interaction (decreased solubility and reduced oral bioavailability of ceritinib) with drugs that increase gastric pH.1 6

Specific Drugs and Foods

Drug or Food

Interaction

Comments

Antacids

Possible decreased ceritinib bioavailability secondary to decreased solubility at higher pH1 6

Antifungals, azoles (e.g., ketoconazole)

Potent CYP3A inhibitors: Possible increased ceritinib exposure and toxicity1

Ketoconazole (200 mg twice daily for 14 days) increased ceritinib (single 450-mg dose in a fasted state) AUC and peak concentrations by 2.9-fold and 22%, respectively1

Concomitant use of ketoconazole with ceritinib 450 mg once daily in a fasted state expected to result in similar steady-state AUC as ceritinib 750 mg given alone once daily in a fasted state 1

Potent CYP3A inhibitors: Avoid concomitant use;1 if concomitant use cannot be avoided, reduce daily dosage of ceritinib by approximately 33% and round to the nearest 150-mg strength (e.g., from 450 mg daily to 300 mg daily)1

If the potent CYP3A inhibitor is discontinued, resume ceritinib at the dosage used prior to initiation of the potent CYP3A inhibitor1

Antimycobacterials, rifamycins (e.g., rifampin)

Possible decreased ceritinib exposure and efficacy1

Rifampin (600 mg daily) decreased AUC and peak concentrations of ceritinib (single 750-mg dose) by 70 and 44%, respectively1 6

Avoid concomitant use1

β-adrenergic blocking agents

Possible additive bradycardic effects1

Avoid concomitant use, if possible1

Calcium-channel blocking agents, nondihydropyridine (e.g., diltiazem, verapamil)

Possible additive bradycardic effects1

Avoid concomitant use, if possible1

Carbamazepine

Possible decreased ceritinib exposure1

Avoid concomitant use1

Clonidine

Possible additive bradycardic effects1

Avoid concomitant use, if possible1

Digoxin

Possible additive bradycardic effects1

Avoid concomitant use, if possible1

Grapefruit or grapefruit juice

Possible increased ceritinib concentrations1

Avoid concomitant use1

Histamine H2-receptor antagonists

Possible decreased ceritinib bioavailability secondary to decreased solubility at higher pH1 6

Midazolam

Possible increased concentrations of midazolam 1

Increased AUC and peak concentration of midazolam by 5.4- and 1.8- fold, respectively1

Avoid concomitant use1

If concomitant use cannot be avoided, consider reducing dosage of midazolam1

Proton-pump inhibitors (e.g., esomeprazole)

Possible decreased ceritinib bioavailability secondary to decreased solubility at higher pH1 6

Esomeprazole decreased AUC and peak concentration of ceritinib (single 750-mg dose in fasted state) by 76 and 79%, respectively, in healthy individuals, but decreases were only 30 and 25%, respectively, in patients receiving proton-pump inhibitors; no clinically meaningful effects on pharmacokinetics of ceritinib observed in these patients at steady state1

Warfarin

Possible increased concentrations of warfarin1

Increased AUC of S-warfarin by 54%; peak concentrations unchanged1

Avoid concomitant use1

If concomitant use cannot be avoided, consider reducing dosage of warfarin and monitor INR more frequently1

Ceritinib Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

Bioavailability

Following oral administration, peak plasma concentrations are attained in about 4–6 hours.1

Systemic exposure increases in greater than dose-proportional manner following repeated administration of ceritinib 50–750 mg once daily.1

Steady-state concentrations are achieved in approximately 15 days.1

Food

Administration of a single 500-mg dose of ceritinib with a high-fat meal (approximately 1000 calories and 58 g of fat) increased AUC and peak plasma concentrations by 73 and 41%, respectively.1

Administration of a single 500-mg dose of ceritinib with a low-fat meal (approximately 330 calories and 9 g of fat) increased AUC and peak plasma concentrations by 58 and 43%, respectively.1

Administration of a single 750-mg dose of ceritinib with a high-fat meal increased AUC and peak plasma concentrations by 64 and 58%, respectively.1

Administration of a single 750-mg dose of ceritinib with a low-fat meal increased AUC and peak plasma concentrations by 39 and 42%, respectively.1

Systemic exposure to ceritinib not substantially altered following administration of ceritinib 450 mg daily with food (approximately 100–500 calories and 1.5–15 g of fat) compared with ceritinib 750 mg daily in a fasted state.1

Special Populations

In pharmacokinetic population analyses, age did not have a clinically important effect on the systemic exposure of ceritinib.1

In patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class C) receiving a single 750-mg dose of ceritinib in a fasting state, mean systemic exposure to total and unbound ceritinib increased by 66 and 108%, respectively, compared with individuals with normal hepatic function.1

Mild or moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh class A or B) does not affect total or unbound systemic exposure to total or unbound ceritinib.1

Mild (Clcr of 60–89 mL/minute) or moderate (Clcr of 30–59 mL/minute) renal impairment: Exposure similar to that in patients with normal renal function.1

Severe renal impairment: Pharmacokinetics not studied.1

Distribution

Extent

Not known whether ceritinib or its metabolites are distributed into human milk.1

Plasma Protein Binding

97%.1

Elimination

Metabolism

Principally metabolized by CYP3A4.1

Elimination Route

Eliminated in feces (92%) and urine (1.3%).1

Half-life

Mean terminal half-life: 41 hours.1

Stability

Storage

Oral

Capsules

20–25°C (may be exposed to 15–30°C).1

Tablets

20–25°C (may be exposed to 15–30°C).1

Actions

  • Inhibits several receptor tyrosine kinases, including ALK, insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGFR-1), insulin receptor, and c-ros oncogene-1 (ROS-1); most active against ALK.1

  • Activating mutations or translocations of the ALK gene identified in several malignancies7 17 and can result in the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins (e.g., echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 [EML4]-ALK).3 8 9 10 11 15 Formation of ALK fusion proteins results in activation and dysregulation of the gene's expression and signaling, which can contribute to increased cell proliferation and survival in tumors expressing these proteins.2 6 7 9 11

  • ALK rearrangements identified in approximately 3–7% of patients with NSCLC.36 38 39

  • Clinical resistance to crizotinib attributed to several possible mechanisms, including acquired resistance mutations of ALK, amplification of gene expression, and activation of alternate signaling pathways.36 38 39 41 CNS is a common site of disease progression in crizotinib-treated patients because of poor distribution of the drug into CSF.36 38 39 41

  • Inhibits ALK phosphorylation,1 3 16 ALK-mediated phosphorylation of the downstream signaling protein signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3), and proliferation of ALK-dependent cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.1

  • Inhibits proliferation of cell lines expressing EML4-ALK and nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion proteins in vitro.1

  • Demonstrates dose-dependent inhibition of EML4-ALK in mice and rats bearing NSCLC tumor xenografts that express EML4-ALK.1

  • Approximately 20-fold more potent than crizotinib against ALK in vitro.16

  • Exhibits dose-dependent antitumor activity in mice bearing NSCLC tumor xenografts that express EML4-ALK with demonstrated resistance to crizotinib.1

Advice to Patients

  • Importance of instructing patients to read the manufacturer's patient information.1

  • If a dose is missed, importance of advising patients to take it as soon as they remember unless it is less than 12 hours before the next dose, in which case they should not take the missed dose.1

  • Importance of informing patients that ceritinib should be taken with food.1 Importance of also advising patients to avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice while taking ceritinib.1

  • Importance of informing patients that nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain are the most common adverse effects associated with ceritinib therapy, as well as supportive treatment options (e.g., antiemetic and/or antidiarrhea agents).1 Importance of contacting clinician if severe or persistent adverse GI effects occur.1

  • Risk of hepatotoxicity; importance of liver function test monitoring.1 Importance of informing patients of signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity (e.g., fatigue, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain [especially right upper quadrant pain], jaundice, dark or “tea-colored” urine, generalized pruritus, unusual bleeding or bruising) and advising them to immediately report possible symptoms of hepatotoxicity to their clinician.1

  • Risk of severe or fatal ILD/pneumonitis.1 Importance of advising patients that pneumonitis symptoms may be similar to those of lung cancer and to contact their clinician immediately if they experience any new or worsening pulmonary symptoms (e.g., dyspnea, shortness of breath, cough with or without mucus, chest pain, fever).1

  • Risk of QTc-interval prolongation and bradycardia.1 Importance of informing clinicians immediately if new chest pain or discomfort, changes in heartbeat, palpitations, dizziness, lightheadedness, faintness, or changes in or new use of cardiovascular or antihypertensive therapy occurs.1

  • Risk of hyperglycemia, particularly in patients with diabetes or glucose intolerance and in those receiving corticosteroid medications.1 Importance of informing patients of the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia (e.g., increased thirst, increased urination, increased appetite, fatigue, blurred vision, headache, difficulty thinking or concentrating, breath that smells like fruit) and advising patients to immediately contact their clinician if they experience such signs and symptoms.1

  • Risk of pancreatitis.1 Importance of informing clinicians immediately if signs or symptoms of pancreatitis (e.g., upper abdominal pain that may spread to the back) occur.1

  • Risk of fetal harm.1 Necessity of advising women of reproductive potential that they should use effective methods of contraception while receiving ceritinib and for 6 months after the drug is discontinued.1 Importance of advising men who are partners with women of reproductive potential to use effective methods of contraception while receiving the drug and for 3 months after the drug is discontinued.1 Importance of patients informing their clinicians if they are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.1 If pregnancy occurs, advise of potential risk to fetus.1

  • Importance of advising women to avoid breast-feeding while receiving ceritinib and for 2 weeks after discontinuance of therapy.1

  • Importance of informing clinicians of existing or contemplated concomitant therapy, including prescription and OTC drugs and dietary or herbal supplements (e.g., St. John's wort), as well as any concomitant illnesses (e.g., hepatic impairment, cardiovascular disease [including congenital long QT syndrome], diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia).1

  • Importance of informing patients of other important precautionary information.1 (See Cautions.)

Preparations

Excipients in commercially available drug preparations may have clinically important effects in some individuals; consult specific product labeling for details.

Please refer to the ASHP Drug Shortages Resource Center for information on shortages of one or more of these preparations.

Ceritinib

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Oral

Capsules

150 mg

Zykadia

Novartis

Tablets, film coated

150 mg

Zykadia

Novartis

AHFS DI Essentials™. © Copyright 2021, Selected Revisions January 25, 2021. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 4500 East-West Highway, Suite 900, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

References

1. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. Zykadia (ceritinib) capsules and tablets prescribing information. East Hanover, NJ: 2019 Mar.

2. Shaw AT, Kim DW, Mehra R et al. Ceritinib in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer. N Engl J Med. 2014; 370:1189-97. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670165?dopt=AbstractPlus http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4079055&blobtype=pdf

3. US Food and Drug Administration. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Application number 205755Orig1s000: Summary review. From FDA website. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/nda/2014/205755Orig1s000SumR.pdf

4. US Food and Drug Administration. FDA Application: Search Orphan Drug Designations and approvals. Rockville, MD. From FDA web site. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/opdlisting/oopd/index.cfm

6. US Food and Drug Administration. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. Application number 205755Orig1s000: Clinical pharmacology and biopharmaceutics review(s). From FDA website. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/nda/2014/205755Orig1s000ClinPharmR.pdf

7. Kwak EL, Bang YJ, Camidge DR et al. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibition in non-small-cell lung cancer. N Engl J Med. 2010; 363:1693-703. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20979469?dopt=AbstractPlus http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3014291&blobtype=pdf

8. Pearson R, Kolesar JM. Targeted therapy for NSCLC: ALK inhibition. J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2011; 18:271-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21844131?dopt=AbstractPlus

9. Sasaki T, Jänne PA. New strategies for treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancers. Clin Cancer Res. 2011; 17:7213-8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22010214?dopt=AbstractPlus http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3477548&blobtype=pdf

10. Food and Drug Administration. FDA news release: FDA approves Xalkori with companion diagnostic test for a type of late-stage lung cancer. Rockville, MD; 2011 Aug 26. From FDA web site. http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm269856.htm

11. Husain H, Rudin CM. ALK-targeted therapy for lung cancer: ready for prime time. J Oncology. 2011; 25:1-6.

12. Tiseo M, Gelsomino F, Bartolotti M et al. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase as a new target for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. Expert Rev Anticancer Ther. 2011; 11:1677-87. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22050016?dopt=AbstractPlus

13. Gaughan EM, Costa DB. Genotype-driven therapies for non-small cell lung cancer: focus on EGFR, KRAS and ALK gene abnormalities. Ther Adv Med Oncol. 2011; 3:113-25. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21904575?dopt=AbstractPlus http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3150063&blobtype=pdf

14. Garber K. ALK, lung cancer, and personalized therapy: portent of the future?. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2010; 102:672-5. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20460631?dopt=AbstractPlus

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