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Viravan-PDM (dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine / pyrilamine) Disease Interactions

There are 14 disease interactions with Viravan-PDM (dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine / pyrilamine):

Major

Antihistamines (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Anticholinergic Effects

Severe Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Gastrointestinal Obstruction, Urinary Retention, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension

Antihistamines often have anticholinergic activity, to which elderly patients are particularly sensitive. Therapy with antihistamines should be administered cautiously, if at all, in patients with preexisting conditions that are likely to be exacerbated by anticholinergic activity, such as urinary retention or obstruction; angle-closure glaucoma, untreated intraocular hypertension, or uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma; and gastrointestinal obstructive disorders. Conventional, first-generation antihistamines such as the ethanolamines (bromodiphenhydramine, carbinoxamine, clemastine, dimenhydrinate, diphenhydramine, doxylamine, phenyltoloxamine) tend to exhibit substantial anticholinergic effects. In contrast, the newer, relatively nonsedating antihistamines (e.g., cetirizine, fexofenadine, loratadine) reportedly have low to minimal anticholinergic activity at normally recommended dosages and may be appropriate alternatives.

References

  1. "Product Information. Optimine (azatadine)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Periactin (cyproheptadine)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  3. "Product Information. Tavist (clemastine)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
View all 20 references
Major

Anxiolytics/Sedatives/Hypnotics (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Depression

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Depression

A variety of abnormal thinking and behavior changes have been reported to occur in association with the use of most anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics. Some of these changes include decreased inhibition, aggressiveness, agitation, and hallucinations. These drugs can cause or exacerbate mental depression and cause suicidal behavior and ideation. Therapy with these drugs should be administered cautiously in patients with a history of depression or other psychiatric disorders. Patients should be monitored for any changes in mood or behavior. It may be prudent to refrain from dispensing large quantities of medication to these patients.

References

  1. "Product Information. Placidyl (ethchlorvynol)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  2. "Product Information. Ambien (zolpidem)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
  3. "Product Information. Equanil (meprobamate)." Wallace Laboratories, Cranbury, NJ.
View all 5 references
Major

Sympathomimetics (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Cardiovascular Disease

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Cardiovascular Disease, Cerebrovascular Insufficiency, Hyperthyroidism, Pheochromocytoma

Sympathomimetic agents may cause adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly when used in high dosages and/or in susceptible patients. In cardiac tissues, these agents may produce positive chronotropic and inotropic effects via stimulation of beta-1 adrenergic receptors. Cardiac output, oxygen consumption, and the work of the heart may be increased. In the peripheral vasculature, vasoconstriction may occur via stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. Palpitations, tachycardia, arrhythmia, hypertension, reflex bradycardia, coronary occlusion, cerebral vasculitis, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, and death have been reported. Some of these agents, particularly ephedra alkaloids (ephedrine, ma huang, phenylpropanolamine), may also predispose patients to hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. Therapy with sympathomimetic agents should generally be avoided or administered cautiously in patients with sensitivity to sympathomimetic amines, hyperthyroidism, or underlying cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disorders. These agents should not be used in patients with severe coronary artery disease or severe/uncontrolled hypertension.

References

  1. Covington TR, Lawson LC, Young LL, eds. "Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs. 10th ed." Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association (1993):
  2. Horowitz JD, Lang WJ, Howes LG, Fennessy MR, Christophidis N, Rand MJ, Louis WJ "Hypertensive responses induced by phenylpropanolamine in anorectic and decongestant preparations." Lancet 1 (1980): 60-1
  3. Gordon RD, Ballantine DM, Bachmann AW "Effects of repeated doses of pseudoephedrine on blood pressure and plasma catecholamines in normal subjects and in patients with phaeochromocytoma." Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 19 (1992): 287-90
View all 56 references
Moderate

Antihistamines (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Asthma/Copd

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

It has been suggested that the anticholinergic effect of antihistamines may reduce the volume and cause thickening of bronchial secretions, resulting in obstruction of respiratory tract. Some manufacturers and clinicians recommend that therapy with antihistamines be administered cautiously in patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

References

  1. "Product Information. Temaril (trimeprazine)" Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA.
  2. "Product Information. Tavist (clemastine)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Periactin (cyproheptadine)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
View all 17 references
Moderate

Antihistamines (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Cardiovascular

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Cardiovascular Disease, Hyperthyroidism, Hypotension

Antihistamines may infrequently cause cardiovascular adverse effects related to their anticholinergic and local anesthetic (quinidine-like) activities. Tachycardia, palpitation, ECG changes, arrhythmias, hypotension, and hypertension have been reported. Although these effects are uncommon and usually limited to overdosage situations, the manufacturers and some clinicians recommend that therapy with antihistamines be administered cautiously in patients with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and/or hyperthyroidism.

References

  1. "Product Information. Dimetane (brompheniramine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Chlortrimeton (chlorpheniramine)." Schering-Plough, Liberty Corner, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Optimine (azatadine)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.
View all 15 references
Moderate

Antihistamines (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Renal/Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease, Renal Dysfunction

Limited pharmacokinetic data are available for the older, first-generation antihistamines. Many appear to be primarily metabolized by the liver, and both parent drugs and metabolites are excreted in the urine. Patients with renal and/or liver disease may be at greater risk for adverse effects from antihistamines due to drug and metabolite accumulation. Therapy with antihistamines should be administered cautiously in such patients. Lower initial dosages may be appropriate.

References

  1. Paton DM, Webster DR "Clinical pharmacokinetics of H1-receptor antagonists (the antihistamines)." Clin Pharmacokinet 10 (1985): 477-97
  2. Rumore MM "Clinical pharmacokinetics of chlorpheniramine." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 18 (1984): 701-7
  3. Simons FE, Frith EM, Simons KJ "The pharmacokinetics and antihistaminic effects of brompheniramine." J Allergy Clin Immunol 70 (1982): 458-64
View all 15 references
Moderate

Antitussives (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Psychiatric Conditions

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Depression, Psychosis, Parkinsonism

Caution should be used when prescribing antitussives such as dextromethorphan and benzonatate in patients with psychiatric or emotional conditions. Isolated instances of bizarre behavior, including mental confusion and visual hallucinations have been reported in patients taking antitussives, specially when combined with other prescribed drugs such as monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

Moderate

Anxiolytics/Sedatives/Hypnotics (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Glaucoma

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Urinary Retention

Some hypnotic drugs can have an anticholinergic effect and should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, and trouble urinating due to retention or enlarged prostate.

Moderate

Anxiolytics/Sedatives/Hypnotics (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

In general, anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics are extensively metabolized by the liver. Their plasma clearance may be decreased and their half-life prolonged in patients with impaired hepatic function. Therapy with these drugs should be administered cautiously in patients with liver disease (some are not recommended in severe liver impairment), and the dosage should be adjusted accordingly. Laboratory testing is recommended prior and during treatment.

Moderate

Pseudoephedrine (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Gi Narrowing

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Gastrointestinal Obstruction

The extended-release formulation of pseudoephedrine (Sudafed 24 Hour) contains a non-deformable material. There have been rare reports of obstructive symptoms in patients with known strictures following the ingestion of similar sustained-release products. Therapy with the extended-release formulation of pseudoephedrine should be administered cautiously in patients with preexisting severe gastrointestinal narrowing or obstruction, whether pathologic or iatrogenic.

References

  1. "Product Information. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Moderate

Pseudoephedrine (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Pku

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Phenylketonuria

Chewable products frequently may contain aspartame, which is metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract to phenylalanine. Sudafed (brand of pseudoephedrine) chewable 15 mg tablets provide the equivalent of 0.78 mg of phenylalanine per each tablet. The aspartame/phenylalanine content should be considered when this and similar products are used in patients who must restrict their intake of phenylalanine (i.e. phenylketonurics).

References

  1. "Product Information. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Moderate

Sympathomimetics (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Bph

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, Prostate Tumor

Sympathomimetic agents may cause or worsen urinary difficulty in patients with prostate enlargement due to smooth muscle contraction in the bladder neck via stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. Therapy with sympathomimetic agents should be administered cautiously in patients with hypertrophy or neoplasm of the prostate.

References

  1. "Product Information. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  2. Covington TR, Lawson LC, Young LL, eds. "Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs. 10th ed." Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association (1993):
  3. Williams DM "Phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride" Am Pharm NS30 (1990): 47-50
Moderate

Sympathomimetics (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Diabetes

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Diabetes Mellitus

Sympathomimetic agents may cause increases in blood glucose concentrations. These effects are usually transient and slight but may be significant with dosages higher than those normally recommended. Therapy with sympathomimetic agents should be administered cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus. Closer monitoring of blood glucose concentrations may be appropriate.

References

  1. "Product Information. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  2. American Medical Association, Division of Drugs and Toxicology "Drug evaluations annual 1994." Chicago, IL: American Medical Association; (1994):
  3. Covington TR, Lawson LC, Young LL, eds. "Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs. 10th ed." Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association (1993):
View all 4 references
Moderate

Sympathomimetics (Includes Viravan-PDM) ↔ Glaucoma

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Glaucoma (Narrow Angle)

Sympathomimetic agents can induce transient mydriasis via stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. In patients with anatomically narrow angles or narrow-angle glaucoma, pupillary dilation can provoke an acute attack. In patients with other forms of glaucoma, mydriasis may occasionally increase intraocular pressure. Therapy with sympathomimetic agents should be administered cautiously in patients with or predisposed to glaucoma, particularly narrow-angle glaucoma.

References

  1. Covington TR, Lawson LC, Young LL, eds. "Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs. 10th ed." Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association (1993):
  2. Fraunfelder FT, Fraunfelder FW; Randall JA "Drug-Induced Ocular Side Effects 5th" Boston, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann (2001):
  3. "Product Information. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Viravan-PDM (dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine / pyrilamine) drug Interactions

There are 878 drug interactions with Viravan-PDM (dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine / pyrilamine)

Viravan-PDM (dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine / pyrilamine) alcohol/food Interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Viravan-PDM (dextromethorphan / pseudoephedrine / pyrilamine)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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