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Meningioma

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

A meningioma is a tumor that starts in the meninges of the brain and spinal cord. The meninges are the tissues that cover the brain and spinal cord. They prevent germs and other substances from entering the brain and spinal cord. Most meningiomas are slow-growing and benign (not cancer).

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • Medicines may be given to kill the tumor cells and decrease the size of the meningioma.
  • Take your medicine as directed. Contact your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him or her if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Follow up with your healthcare provider or surgeon as directed:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Self-care:

  • Drink liquids as directed. Ask how much liquid to drink each day and which liquids are best for you. If you have nausea or diarrhea from treatment, extra liquids may help decrease your risk for dehydration.
  • Eat healthy foods. Healthy foods include fruits, vegetables, whole-grain breads, low-fat dairy products, beans, lean meats, and fish. This may help you feel better during treatment and decrease side effects. You may need to change what you eat during treatment. Do not eat foods or drink liquids that cause gas, such as cabbage, beans, onions, or soft drinks. A nutritionist may help to plan the best meals and snacks for you.
  • Exercise. Ask about the best exercise plan for you. Exercise may improve your energy levels and appetite.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You have a fever.
  • You vomit repeatedly, and cannot keep any food or liquids down.
  • You have a severe headache, or you feel dizzy.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Return to the emergency department if:

  • You have any of the following signs of a stroke:
    • Numbness or drooping on one side of your face
    • Weakness in an arm or leg
    • Confusion or difficulty speaking
    • Dizziness, a severe headache, or vision loss

© 2016 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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