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Blood And Urine Ketones

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Ketones are made when your body turns fat into energy. This happens when your body does not have enough insulin to turn sugar into energy. Ketones are released into your blood. Your kidneys get rid of ketones in your urine. You may need to test your urine or blood for ketones when your blood sugar levels are high. Early treatment for high levels of urine or blood ketones may prevent diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition that can lead to coma or death.

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Call 911 for any of the following:

  • You have a seizure.
  • You begin to breathe fast, or are short of breath.

Return to the emergency department immediately if:

  • You become weak and confused.
  • You have fruity, sweet breath.
  • You have severe, new stomach pain and are vomiting.
  • You are more drowsy than usual.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • Your ketone level is higher than your healthcare provider said it should be.
  • Your blood sugar level is lower or higher than your healthcare provider says it should be.
  • You have moderate or large amounts of ketones in your urine or blood.
  • You have a fever or chills.
  • You are more thirsty than usual.
  • You are urinating more often than usual.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

When to test your urine or blood for ketones:

Your healthcare provider will tell you if you need to test your urine or blood. Test for ketones when you have any of the following:

  • Your blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dl.
  • You have nausea, abdominal pain, or are vomiting.
  • You have an illness such as a cold or the flu.
  • You feel more tired than usual.
  • You are more thirsty than normal or have a dry mouth.
  • Your skin is flushed.
  • You urinate more than usual.

How to test for urine ketones:

Ask your healthcare provider where to purchase a urine ketone test kit. The kit usually comes with a plastic cup, a bottle of test strips, and directions. Follow the instructions in the ketone test kit. Check the expiration date to make sure the kit has not expired. The following is an overview of how to test your urine for ketones:

  • Urinate into a clean container. You can use a clean plastic cup if your kit does not come with a cup.
  • Dip the test strip into the sample. The directions will tell you how long to hold the test strip in urine. Gently shake extra urine off of the strip.
  • You can also urinate directly onto the test strip. The directions will tell you how long to hold the test strip in your stream of urine. Gently shake extra urine off of the strip.
  • Wait for the test strip to change color. The directions will tell you how long you need to wait.
  • Hold the test strip next to the color chart on the bottle. Match the color on your strip to a color on the bottle. The color on the bottle will tell you the amount of ketones in your urine. The amount of ketones in your urine may be negative, trace, small, moderate, or large.
  • Write down the results.

How to test for blood ketones:

Ask your healthcare provider where to purchase a meter that tests for blood ketones. The meter is similar to the one you use to check your blood sugar level. Your healthcare provider will teach you how to use this meter. The following is an overview on how to use a meter to test your blood for ketones:

  • Follow directions to set up the meter. Insert a test strip.
  • Clean your finger with an alcohol wipe. Let your finger dry for 30 seconds.
  • Use a lancet to prick your finger. Gently squeeze your finger to make it bleed.
  • Touch the end of test strip to the drop of blood. The meter will beep when the strip has enough blood on it.
  • The meter will tell you your blood ketone level on a tiny screen. Write down the results.

Prevent ketones in your urine or blood:

Keep control of your blood sugar levels to prevent your body from making ketones. Do the following to control your blood sugar levels:

  • Monitor your blood sugar levels as directed. Report high or low levels to your healthcare provider. You may need more insulin than usual when your blood sugar levels are high. Early treatment of high blood sugar levels may prevent your body from making ketones.
  • Take insulin and diabetes medicines as directed. Do not skip a dose of insulin or diabetes medicine.
  • Follow your meal plan. Ask your healthcare provider for more information about what you should eat. You may need to meet with a registered dietician to help you plan your meals.
  • Follow instructions for sick days. Your blood sugar levels may increase when you are sick. Make changes to your diabetes medicine as directed when you are sick.

Follow up with your healthcare provider as directed:

You may need to return often for blood tests. Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

© 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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