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I started taking antabuse yesterdayand one today...will I be ok to drink alittle?

Responses (5)

Rajive Goel 2 Aug 2012

Usually drinking is not recommended when taking meds but please do restrict it to a 'little'.

Do seek medical advice from the doc/pharmacist who prescribed the med.

Take care!

Anonymous 2 Aug 2012

I am suuming you are taking anatabuse to STOP dringking! Please try to keep with your program. You are only doing yourself a favor. If you a re still having problems, & wanting to drink, try to get to an AA or NA meeting & learn all you can about your problem. You are NOT alone... Mary

bumblebee90 2 Aug 2012

I agree with Mary. I was on antabuse years ago, when I was still drinking, and drank just a little. It made me sicker than ever. I highly reccomend not doing this. Ruthie

Anonymous 2 Aug 2012

Oh gosh, sorry for all the typos! Hope you got what I meant... Mary

Anonymous 2 Aug 2012

Hello maryann12. No, the drug works much like a time bomb. Depending how sensitive you are to the Antabuse, the immediate results could be deadly. Any hint of alcohol in your system will set of physical reactions. Blood pressure going sky-high, heart beating far, far to quickly etc. pledge

bumblebee90 2 Aug 2012

Pledge is right on. As I stated on Mary's answer... yrs ago, when I still was drinking, I was on antabuse and drank just a little, and experienced exactly what Pledge just explained. Please do not try this. Ruthie

DzooBaby 2 Aug 2012

Antabuse along with even small amounts of alcohol can make you violently ill. They even recommend that you do not take any liquid medications that contain alcohol like cough preparations and the like. Disulfiram (Antabuse) plus alcohol, even small amounts, produce flushing, throbbing in head and neck, throbbing headache, respiratory difficulty, nausea, copious vomiting, sweating, thirst, chest pain, palpitation, dyspnea (cant catch your breath), hyperventilation, tachycardia (very fast heartrate), hypotension (low blood pressure), syncope (fainting), marked uneasiness, weakness, vertigo, blurred vision, and confusion. In severe reactions there may be respiratory depression, cardiovascular collapse, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute congestive heart failure, unconsciousness, convulsions, and death. The intensity of the reaction varies with each individual, but is generally proportional to the amounts of disulfiram and alcohol ingested.

Lisa01 2 Aug 2012

Very informative and very well put. Thumbs up to you for this one!! :)
Lisa

Anonymous 3 Aug 2012

Hello,

If you start something , have the strength to follow through and finish it,from a rehabilitated functional alcoholic and cocaine addict ( I was an addict for 20 years). I was in rehab for 1 year, I can help you privately, for that you must friend me (click on my avatar and add me as a friend then I will accept, if you really want a 2nd chance in life).

Good luck, although luck has nothing to do with the journey to a new life.-

maso.-

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