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Morphine Pregnancy and Breastfeeding Warnings

Morphine is also known as: Arymo ER, Avinza, Duramorph, Duramorph PF, Infumorph, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS Contin, MS/S, MSIR, Mitigo, MorphaBond ER, Morphine LP Epidural, Morphine Rapi-Ject, Morphine Sulfate ER, Morphine Sulfate IR, Morphine Sulfate SR, OMS, Oramorph SR, RMS, Rescudose, Roxanol, Roxanol 100, Roxanol-T, Statex

Medically reviewed on December 12, 2017

Morphine Pregnancy Warnings

Administration is not recommended during pregnancy or labor unless the potential benefits outweigh the potential risks to the developing fetus.

AU TGA pregnancy category: C
US FDA pregnancy category: C

Comments: Chronic use of this drug in later pregnancy has been associated with neonatal withdrawal. Neonatal respiratory depression is possible when morphine is used in labor. Equipment for neonatal resuscitation should be available if morphine must be used in labor.

-Administration of this drug during labor may prolong or shorten labor and cause respiratory depression in the neonate.
-No increased risk of congenital malformations in humans has been associated with use of this drug in pregnancy. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy.

AU TGA pregnancy category C: Drugs which, owing to their pharmacological effects, have caused or may be suspected of causing, harmful effects on the human fetus or neonate without causing malformations. These effects may be reversible. Accompanying texts should be consulted for further details.
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US FDA pregnancy category C: Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks.

See references

Morphine Breastfeeding Warnings

Benefit should outweigh risk.

Excreted into human milk: Yes

This drug may delay the onset of lactation. Maternal use of oral narcotics during breastfeeding can cause infant drowsiness and central nervous system depression. Newborn infants appear to be particularly sensitive to the effects of even small dosages of narcotic analgesics. When breastmilk comes in, it is advised to limit maternal intake of morphine to a few days at a low dosage with close infant monitoring.

See references

References for pregnancy information

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  2. Koren G, Pastuszak A, Ito S "Drugs in pregnancy." N Engl J Med 338 (1998): 1128-37
  3. Way WL, Costley EC, Way EL "Respiratory sensitivity of the newborn infant to meperidine and morphine." Clin Pharmacol Ther 6 (1965): 454-61
  4. "Product Information. Roxanol (morphine)." Roxane Laboratories Inc, Columbus, OH.
  5. "Product Information. DepoDur (morphine liposomal)." Endo Laboratories LLC, Chadds Ford, PA.

References for breastfeeding information

  1. Benyhe S "Minireview: morphine: new aspects in the study of an ancient compound." Life Sci 55 (1994): 969-79
  2. Spigset O "Anaesthetic agents and excretion in breast milk." Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 38 (1994): 94-103
  3. "Product Information. Roxanol (morphine)." Roxane Laboratories Inc, Columbus, OH.
  4. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  5. Way WL, Costley EC, Way EL "Respiratory sensitivity of the newborn infant to meperidine and morphine." Clin Pharmacol Ther 6 (1965): 454-61

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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