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Procarbazine

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jul 15, 2020.

Pronunciation

(proe KAR ba zeen)

Index Terms

  • Benzmethyzin
  • Ibenzmethyzin
  • MIH Hydrochloride
  • N-Methylhydrazine
  • PCB
  • PCZ
  • Procarbazine HCl
  • Procarbazine Hydrochloride

Dosage Forms

Excipient information presented when available (limited, particularly for generics); consult specific product labeling. [DSC] = Discontinued product

Capsule, Oral, as hydrochloride:

Matulane: 50 mg [DSC]

Matulane: 50 mg [contains corn starch, fd&c yellow #10 (quinoline yellow), fd&c yellow #6 (sunset yellow), methylparaben, propylparaben]

Brand Names: U.S.

  • Matulane

Pharmacologic Category

  • Antineoplastic Agent, Alkylating Agent

Pharmacology

Procarbazine inhibits DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis by inhibiting transmethylation of methionine into transfer RNA; may also damage DNA directly through alkylation.

Absorption

Rapid and complete

Distribution

Crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes into CSF

Metabolism

Primarily hepatic. Oxidized to active metabolites methylazoxy-procarbazine and benzylazoxy-procarbazine, then further metabolized to inactive metabolites (Kintzel 1995)

Excretion

Urine (70% as inactive metabolites [Kintzel 1995]; <5% as unchanged drug)

Time to Peak

≤1 hour

Half-Life Elimination

~1 hour

Use: Labeled Indications

Hodgkin lymphoma: Treatment of stage III or IV Hodgkin lymphoma (in combination with other chemotherapy agents)

Off Label Uses

CNS tumors, anaplastic oligodendroglioma/oligoastrocytoma

Data (including long-term follow-up) from a multicenter, randomized, controlled phase III trial (EORTC 26951) in patients with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas or anaplastic oligoastrocytomas supports the use of procarbazine (in combination with lomustine and vincristine [PCV regimen]) after radiotherapy for the treatment of this condition [van den Bent 2006], [van den Bent 2013]. Results from another clinical trial (RTOG 9402) demonstrated that the PCV regimen, followed by radiotherapy, significantly improved progression free survival compared to radiotherapy alone, although the difference in overall survival was not significant [Cairncross 2006]. However, long-term RTOG 9402 results illustrated that in a subset of patients with 1p/19q codeleted tumors, overall survival was significantly longer in patients who received PCV followed by radiotherapy compared to those who received radiotherapy alone [Cairncross 2013].

CNS tumors, low-grade gliomas

Long-term follow-up data from a randomized phase III study support the use of procarbazine (PCV regimen; in combination with lomustine, vincristine, and radiation therapy) for the treatment of low-grade gliomas in adults ≤40 years following resection and in adults ≥40 years [Buckner 2016].

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas, relapsed/refractory

Data from a study evaluating the use of CEPP (B) (cyclophosphamide, etoposide, procarbazine, and prednisone [with or without bleomycin]) in patients with recurrent or resistant non-Hodgkin lymphoma who are ineligible for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or who cannot tolerate standard chemotherapy regimens supports the use of procarbazine (as a component of the CEPP regimen) for the treatment of this condition [Chao 1990].

Data from a study evaluating the use of PEP-C (prednisone, etoposide, procarbazine, cyclophosphamide) regimen in patients with recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma supports the use of procarbazine (PEP-C regimen) for the treatment of recurrent or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma [Coleman 2008].

Primary CNS lymphoma

Data from two multicenter phase II trials support the use of procarbazine (in combination with rituximab, high-dose methotrexate, leucovorin, and vincristine [R-MPV], followed by radiotherapy and cytarabine, and intrathecal methotrexate if indicated) for the treatment of newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) [Morris 2013], [Shah 2007]. Data from a single center study also support the use of R-MPV, followed by consolidation high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant in newly diagnosed PCNSL [Omuro 2015]. Data from a multicenter, single-arm, phase II trial suggest that procarbazine (in combination with rituximab and high-dose methotrexate) may be an efficacious regimen in newly diagnosed PCNSL patients ≥65 years [Fritsch 2017].

Contraindications

Known hypersensitivity to procarbazine or any component of the formulation; inadequate bone marrow reserve

Dosing: Adult

Note: Procarbazine is associated with a high emetic potential; antiemetics are recommended to prevent nausea and vomiting (Hesketh 2017; Roila 2016). The manufacturer suggests that an estimated lean body mass be used in obese patients and patients with rapid weight gain due to edema, ascites, or abnormal fluid retention.

CNS tumors, anaplastic oligodendroglioma/oligoastrocytoma (off-label use): PCV regimen: Oral: 60 mg/m2 days 8 to 21 every 6 weeks (in combination with lomustine and vincristine, begin within 4 weeks after radiotherapy) for 6 cycles (van den Bent 2006; van den Bent 2013) or 75 mg/m2 days 8 to 21 every 6 weeks (in combination with lomustine and vincristine, followed by radiotherapy) for up to 4 cycles (Cairncross 2006; Cairncross 2013).

CNS tumors (low-grade gliomas) (off-label use): PCV regimen: Oral: 60 mg/m2 days 8 to 21 every 8 weeks (after radiotherapy; in combination with lomustine and vincristine) for 6 cycles (Buckner 2016)

Hodgkin lymphoma:

BEACOPP, standard or escalated regimen (off-label dosing): Oral: 100 mg/m2 days 1 to 7 every 21 days (in combination with bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) for 8 cycles (Diehl 2003)

MOPP regimen: While procarbazine is approved as part of the MOPP regimen, the MOPP regimen is generally no longer used due to improved toxicity profiles with other combination regimens used in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma.

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas, relapsed/refractory (NHL; off-label use):

CEPP regimen: Oral: 60 mg/m2 days 1 to 10 every 28 days (in combination with cyclophosphamide, etoposide and prednisone) (Chao 1990)

PEP-C regimen: Oral: 50 mg daily at bedtime (length of induction cycle depends on phase of treatment and blood counts; frequency may vary based on tolerance in maintenance cycle; in combination with prednisone, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide) (Coleman 2008)

Primary CNS lymphoma (off-label use): Oral:

R-MPV regimen: Induction: 100 mg/m2 for 7 days in cycles 1, 3, and 5 (in combination with rituximab, high-dose methotrexate, leucovorin, and vincristine; each cycle is 14 days), followed by reduced-dose whole brain radiotherapy and cytarabine (Morris 2013; Shah 2007) or autologous stem cell transplant (Omuro 2015). Two additional cycles of R-MPV may be administered to patients with partial response after initial induction chemotherapy; refer to protocols for details.

R-MP regimen: Patients ≥65 years: 60 mg/m2 on days 2 to 11 every 42 days (in combination with rituximab, high-dose methotrexate, and leucovorin) for 3 cycles, followed by maintenance treatment (beginning on day 43 after the last R-MP induction cycle): 100 mg once daily for 5 days every 28 days for 6 maintenance cycles; administer maintenance even if not all 3 induction cycles were completed (Fritsch 2017)

Dosage adjustment for concomitant therapy: Significant drug interactions exist, requiring dose/frequency adjustment or avoidance. Consult drug interactions database for more information.

Dosing: Geriatric

Refer to adult dosing; use with caution.

Dosing: Pediatric

Note: Refer to individual protocols for specific dosage and interval information. Procarbazine is associated with a high emetic potential (Dupuis 2011); antiemetics are recommended to prevent nausea and vomiting (Dupuis 2013). The manufacturer suggests that an estimated lean body mass be used in obese patients and patients with rapid weight gain due to edema, ascites, or abnormal fluid retention.

Hodgkin lymphoma:

MOPP regimen: Note: While procarbazine is approved as part of the MOPP regimen, the MOPP regimen is generally no longer used due to improved toxicity profiles with other combination regimens used in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (Kelly 2012). Manufacturer's labeling: Infants, Children, and Adolescents: Oral: 50 to 100 mg/m2/day once daily for 14 days of a 28-day cycle (Longo 1986)

BEACOPP regimen (high-risk): Limited data available: Children and Adolescents: Oral: 100 mg/m2 days 0 to 6 of a 21-day treatment cycle (in combination with bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) for 2 to 4 cycles (Kelly 2011)

CNS tumors; low-grade gliomas, WHO grades 1 and 2: Limited data available: TPCV regimen: Children <10 years: Oral: 50 mg/m2 every 6 hours for 4 doses (at hours 60, 66, 72, and 78) during a 42-day cycle (in combination with thioguanine, vincristine, and lomustine) for a total of 8 cycles (Ater 2012)

Dosage adjustment for concomitant therapy: Significant drug interactions exist, requiring dose/frequency adjustment or avoidance. Consult drug interactions database for more information.

Dosing: Adjustment for Toxicity

Withhold treatment (promptly) for any of the following: CNS toxicity (eg, paresthesia, confusion, neuropathy), hematologic toxicity (WBC <4,000/mm3 or platelets <100,000/mm3), hypersensitivity, gastrointestinal toxicities (stomatitis, diarrhea), and hemorrhage or bleeding.

Dosing: Obesity

ASCO Guidelines for appropriate chemotherapy dosing in obese adults with cancer: Utilize patient’s actual body weight (full weight) for calculation of body surface area- or weight-based dosing, particularly when the intent of therapy is curative; manage regimen-related toxicities in the same manner as for nonobese patients; if a dose reduction is utilized due to toxicity, consider resumption of full weight-based dosing with subsequent cycles, especially if cause of toxicity (eg, hepatic or renal impairment) is resolved (Griggs 2012). Note: The manufacturer suggests that an estimated lean body mass be used in obese patients and patients with rapid weight gain due to edema, ascites, or abnormal fluid retention.

Extemporaneously Prepared

A 10 mg/mL oral suspension may be prepared using capsules, glycerin, and strawberry syrup. Empty the contents of ten 50 mg capsules into a mortar. Add 2 mL glycerin and mix to a thick uniform paste. Add 10 mL strawberry syrup in incremental proportions; mix until uniform. Transfer the mixture to an amber glass bottle and rinse mortar with small amounts of strawberry syrup; add rinses to the bottle in sufficient quantity to make 50 mL. Label “shake well” and “protect from light”. Stable for 7 days at room temperature.

Matulane® data on file, Sigma Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Administration

Oral: May be given as a single daily dose or in 2 to 3 divided doses. Some protocols administered in the evening; refer to specific protocol for details. Procarbazine is associated with a high emetic potential in adults; antiemetics are recommended to prevent nausea and vomiting (Hesketh 2017; Roila 2010).

Dietary Considerations

Avoid tyramine-containing foods/beverages. Some examples include aged or matured cheese; air-dried, smoked, pickled, or cured meats (including sausages and salamis); fava or broad bean pods; tap/draft beers; ripe bananas; Marmite concentrate; sauerkraut; and soy sauce and other soybean condiments.

Storage

Protect from light.

Drug Interactions

5-Aminosalicylic Acid Derivatives: May enhance the myelosuppressive effect of Myelosuppressive Agents. Monitor therapy

Amifampridine: Agents With Seizure Threshold Lowering Potential may enhance the neuroexcitatory and/or seizure-potentiating effect of Amifampridine. Monitor therapy

Baricitinib: Immunosuppressants may enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Baricitinib. Management: Use of baricitinib in combination with potent immunosuppressants such as azathioprine or cyclosporine is not recommended. Concurrent use with antirheumatic doses of methotrexate or nonbiologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) is permitted. Consider therapy modification

BCG (Intravesical): Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of BCG (Intravesical). Avoid combination

BCG (Intravesical): Myelosuppressive Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of BCG (Intravesical). Avoid combination

BuPROPion: May enhance the neuroexcitatory and/or seizure-potentiating effect of Agents With Seizure Threshold Lowering Potential. Monitor therapy

Carbocisteine: Procarbazine may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Carbocisteine. Specifically, procarbazine may enhance adverse effects of alcohol that is present in liquid formulations of carbocisteine-containing products. Monitor therapy

Chloramphenicol (Ophthalmic): May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Myelosuppressive Agents. Monitor therapy

Cladribine: May enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Immunosuppressants. Avoid combination

Cladribine: May enhance the myelosuppressive effect of Myelosuppressive Agents. Avoid combination

CloZAPine: Myelosuppressive Agents may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of CloZAPine. Specifically, the risk for neutropenia may be increased. Monitor therapy

Coccidioides immitis Skin Test: Immunosuppressants may diminish the diagnostic effect of Coccidioides immitis Skin Test. Monitor therapy

Deferiprone: Myelosuppressive Agents may enhance the neutropenic effect of Deferiprone. Management: Avoid the concomitant use of deferiprone and myelosuppressive agents whenever possible. If this combination cannot be avoided, monitor the absolute neutrophil count more closely. Consider therapy modification

Denosumab: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Immunosuppressants. Specifically, the risk for serious infections may be increased. Monitor therapy

Dipyrone: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Myelosuppressive Agents. Specifically, the risk for agranulocytosis and pancytopenia may be increased Avoid combination

Echinacea: May diminish the therapeutic effect of Immunosuppressants. Management: Consider avoiding Echinacea in patients receiving therapeutic immunosuppressants. If coadministered, monitor for reduced efficacy of the immunosuppressant during concomitant use. Consider therapy modification

Fingolimod: Immunosuppressants may enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Fingolimod. Management: Avoid the concomitant use of fingolimod and other immunosuppressants when possible. If combined, monitor patients closely for additive immunosuppressant effects (eg, infections). Consider therapy modification

Inebilizumab: May enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Immunosuppressants. Monitor therapy

Iohexol: Agents With Seizure Threshold Lowering Potential may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Iohexol. Specifically, the risk for seizures may be increased. Management: Discontinue agents that may lower the seizure threshold 48 hours prior to intrathecal use of iohexol. Wait at least 24 hours after the procedure to resume such agents. In nonelective procedures, consider use of prophylactic anticonvulsants. Consider therapy modification

Iomeprol: Agents With Seizure Threshold Lowering Potential may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Iomeprol. Specifically, the risk for seizures may be increased. Management: Discontinue agents that may lower the seizure threshold 48 hours prior to intrathecal use of iomeprol. Wait at least 24 hours after the procedure to resume such agents. In nonelective procedures, consider use of prophylactic anticonvulsants. Consider therapy modification

Iopamidol: Agents With Seizure Threshold Lowering Potential may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Iopamidol. Specifically, the risk for seizures may be increased. Management: Discontinue agents that may lower the seizure threshold 48 hours prior to intrathecal use of iopamidol. Wait at least 24 hours after the procedure to resume such agents. In nonelective procedures, consider use of prophylactic anticonvulsants. Consider therapy modification

Leflunomide: Immunosuppressants may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Leflunomide. Specifically, the risk for hematologic toxicity such as pancytopenia, agranulocytosis, and/or thrombocytopenia may be increased. Management: Consider not using a leflunomide loading dose in patients receiving other immunosuppressants. Patients receiving both leflunomide and another immunosuppressant should be monitored for bone marrow suppression at least monthly. Consider therapy modification

Lenograstim: Antineoplastic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Lenograstim. Management: Avoid the use of lenograstim 24 hours before until 24 hours after the completion of myelosuppressive cytotoxic chemotherapy. Consider therapy modification

Levosulpiride: Benzamide Derivatives may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Levosulpiride. Monitor therapy

Lipegfilgrastim: Antineoplastic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Lipegfilgrastim. Management: Avoid concomitant use of lipegfilgrastim and myelosuppressive cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lipegfilgrastim should be administered at least 24 hours after the completion of myelosuppressive cytotoxic chemotherapy. Consider therapy modification

Natalizumab: Immunosuppressants may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Natalizumab. Specifically, the risk of concurrent infection may be increased. Avoid combination

Nivolumab: Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of Nivolumab. Management: Avoid use of immunosuppressants (including systemic corticosteroids) prior to initiation of nivolumab. Use of immunosuppressants after administration of nivolumab (eg, for immune-related toxicity) is unlikely to affect nivolumab efficacy. Consider therapy modification

Ocrelizumab: May enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Immunosuppressants. Monitor therapy

Ozanimod: Immunosuppressants may enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Ozanimod. Monitor therapy

Palifermin: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Antineoplastic Agents. Specifically, the duration and severity of oral mucositis may be increased. Management: Do not administer palifermin within 24 hours before, during infusion of, or within 24 hours after administration of myelotoxic chemotherapy. Consider therapy modification

Pidotimod: Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of Pidotimod. Monitor therapy

Pimecrolimus: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Immunosuppressants. Avoid combination

Promazine: May enhance the myelosuppressive effect of Myelosuppressive Agents. Monitor therapy

Roflumilast: May enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Immunosuppressants. Management: Consider avoiding concomitant use of roflumilast and immunosuppressants as recommended by the Canadian product monograph. Inhaled or short-term corticosteroids are unlikely to be problematic. Consider therapy modification

Siponimod: Immunosuppressants may enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Siponimod. Monitor therapy

Sipuleucel-T: Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of Sipuleucel-T. Management: Evaluate patients to see if it is medically appropriate to reduce or discontinue therapy with immunosuppressants prior to initiating sipuleucel-T therapy. Consider therapy modification

Smallpox and Monkeypox Vaccine (Live): Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of Smallpox and Monkeypox Vaccine (Live). Monitor therapy

Tacrolimus (Topical): May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Immunosuppressants. Avoid combination

Talimogene Laherparepvec: Immunosuppressants may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Talimogene Laherparepvec. Specifically, the risk for disseminated herpetic infection may be increased. Avoid combination

Tertomotide: Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of Tertomotide. Monitor therapy

Tofacitinib: Immunosuppressants may enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Tofacitinib. Management: Concurrent use with antirheumatic doses of methotrexate or nonbiologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) is permitted, and this warning seems particularly focused on more potent immunosuppressants. Consider therapy modification

Upadacitinib: Immunosuppressants may enhance the immunosuppressive effect of Upadacitinib. Management: Concomitant use of upadacitinib with potent immunosuppressants is not recommended. Avoid combination

Vaccines (Inactivated): Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of Vaccines (Inactivated). Management: Complete all age-appropriate vaccinations at least 2 weeks prior to starting an immunosuppressant. If vaccinated less than 2 weeks before starting or during immunosuppressant therapy, revaccinate at least 3 months after immunosuppressant discontinuation. Consider therapy modification

Vaccines (Live): Immunosuppressants may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Vaccines (Live). Immunosuppressants may diminish the therapeutic effect of Vaccines (Live). Management: Avoid use of live organism vaccines with immunosuppressants; live-attenuated vaccines should not be given for at least 3 months after immunosuppressants. Avoid combination

Adverse Reactions

The following adverse drug reactions and incidences are derived from product labeling unless otherwise specified.

Frequency not always defined.

Cardiovascular: Edema, flushing, hypotension, syncope, tachycardia

Central nervous system: Apprehension, ataxia, chills, coma, confusion, depression, dizziness, drowsiness, falling, fatigue, hallucination, headache, hyporeflexia, insomnia, lethargy, nervousness, neuropathy, nightmares, pain, paresthesia, seizure, slurred speech, unsteadiness

Dermatologic: Alopecia, dermatitis, diaphoresis, hyperpigmentation, pruritus, skin rash, urticaria

Endocrine & metabolic: Gynecomastia (in prepubertal and early pubertal males)

Gastrointestinal: Nausea and vomiting (60% to 90%; increasing the dose in a stepwise fashion over several days may minimize), abdominal pain, anorexia, constipation, diarrhea, dysphagia, hematemesis, melena, stomatitis, xerostomia

Genitourinary: Reduced fertility (>10%), azoospermia (reported with combination chemotherapy), hematuria, nocturia

Hematologic & oncologic: Malignant neoplasm (2% to 15%; secondary; nonlymphoid; reported with combination therapy), anemia, bone marrow depression, eosinophilia, hemolysis (in patients with G6PD deficiency), hemolytic anemia, pancytopenia, petechia, purpura, thrombocytopenia

Hepatic: Hepatic insufficiency, jaundice

Hypersensitivity: Hypersensitivity reaction

Infection: Herpes virus infection, increased susceptibility to infection

Neuromuscular & skeletal: Arthralgia, foot-drop, myalgia, tremor, weakness

Ophthalmic: Accommodation disturbance, diplopia, nystagmus, papilledema, photophobia, retinal hemorrhage

Otic: Hearing loss

Renal: Polyuria

Respiratory: Cough, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hoarseness, pleural effusion, pneumonitis, pulmonary toxicity (<1%)

Miscellaneous: Fever

ALERT: U.S. Boxed Warning

Experienced physician:

It is recommended that procarbazine be given only by or under the supervision of a physician experienced in the use of potent antineoplastic drugs. Adequate clinical and laboratory facilities should be available to patients for proper monitoring of treatment.

Warnings/Precautions

Concerns related to adverse effects:

• Bone marrow suppression: Hematologic toxicity (leukopenia and thrombocytopenia) occurs 2 to 8 weeks after treatment initiation. Allow ≥1 month interval between radiation therapy or myelosuppressive chemotherapy and initiation of procarbazine treatment. Withhold treatment for leukopenia (WBC <4,000/mm3) or thrombocytopenia (platelets <100,000/mm3). Monitor for infections due to neutropenia.

• CNS toxicity: Withhold treatment for CNS toxicity (eg, paresthesias, neuropathies, confusion). CNS depression may occur; use with caution with other agents associated with CNS depression.

• Disulfiram-like reaction: Avoid ethanol consumption during procarbazine therapy, as a disulfiram-like reaction may occur.

• Gastrointestinal toxicities: Antiemetics may be recommended to prevent nausea and vomiting; procarbazine is associated with a high emetic potential in adults and doses >100 mg/m2/day may be associated with a high emetic potential in pediatrics (Dupuis 2011; Hesketh 2017; Roila 2016). May cause diarrhea and stomatitis; withhold treatment for diarrhea or stomatitis.

• Hemolysis: Procarbazine may cause hemolysis and/or presence of Heinz inclusion bodies in erythrocytes.

• Hemorrhage: Withhold treatment for hemorrhage or bleeding tendencies.

• Hypersensitivity: Generalized allergic reactions have been reported. Withhold treatment for hypersensitivity.

• Secondary malignancies: Procarbazine is possibly carcinogenic; acute myeloid leukemia and lung cancer have been reported following the use of procarbazine in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents.

Disease-related concerns:

• Hepatic impairment: Use with caution in patients with hepatic impairment (toxicities may be increased).

• Renal impairment: Use with caution in patients with renal impairment (toxicities may be increased).

Concurrent drug therapy issues:

• Monoamine oxidase inhibitor activity: Procarbazine may possess some monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) activity; the potential for serious drug and food interactions is unclear as there is no clinical evidence to support such interactions; following an MAOI diet (avoid tyramine-containing foods) is recommended.

Other warnings/precautions:

• Experienced physician: [US Boxed Warning]: Should be administered under the supervision of an experienced cancer chemotherapy physician.

Monitoring Parameters

CBC with differential, platelet and reticulocyte count, urinalysis, liver function test, renal function test. Monitor for infections, CNS toxicity, and gastrointestinal toxicities. Monitor adherence.

Reproductive Considerations

Females of reproductive potential should avoid becoming pregnant during treatment.

Azoospermia and infertility have been reported with procarbazine when used in combination with other chemotherapy agents.

Pregnancy Considerations

Procarbazine may cause fetal harm if administered to a pregnant female. There are case reports of fetal malformations in the offspring of pregnant women exposed to procarbazine as part of a combination chemotherapy regimen.

Patient Education

What is this drug used for?

• It is used to treat a type of lymphoma.

• It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

• Fatigue

• Nausea

• Vomiting

• Lack of appetite

• Dry mouth

• Hair loss

• Abdominal pain

• Constipation

• Headache

• Muscle pain

• Joint pain

• Skin discoloration

• Flushing

• Trouble sleeping

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

• Infection

• Bleeding like vomiting blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; coughing up blood; blood in the urine; black, red, or tarry stools; bleeding from the gums; abnormal vaginal bleeding; bruises without a reason or that get bigger; or any severe or persistent bleeding

• Liver problems like dark urine, fatigue, lack of appetite, nausea, abdominal pain, light-colored stools, vomiting, or yellow skin

• Shortness of breath

• Severe dizziness

• Passing out

• Fast heartbeat

• Swelling

• Confusion

• Sensitivity to light

• Passing a lot of urine

• Sweating a lot

• Slurred speech

• Enlarged breasts (males)

• Diarrhea

• Burning or numbness feeling

• Vision changes

• Eye pain

• Severe eye irritation

• Nightmares

• Hearing loss

• Tremors

• Seizures

• Change in balance

• Severe loss of strength and energy

• Mouth irritation

• Mouth sores

• Trouble swallowing

• Involuntary eye movements

• Mood changes

• Sensing things that seem real but are not

• Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all side effects. Talk to your doctor if you have questions.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer: This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a limited summary of general information about the medicine’s uses from the patient education leaflet and is not intended to be comprehensive. This limited summary does NOT include all information available about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. For a more detailed summary of information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine, please speak with your healthcare provider and review the entire patient education leaflet.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.