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Tipranavir Disease Interactions

There are 4 disease interactions with tipranavir:

Major

Pis (Includes Tipranavir) ↔ Hemophilia

Severe Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Coagulation Defect

There have been postmarketing reports of increased bleeding, including spontaneous skin hematomas and hemarthrosis, in types A and B hemophiliac patients treated with protease inhibitors. However, a causal relationship has not been established. In some patients, additional Factor VIII was given. In more than half of the reported cases, protease inhibitor therapy was continued or reintroduced following an interruption. Hemophiliacs and patients with other coagulation defects should be monitored closely for bleeding during protease inhibitor therapy.

References

  1. "Product Information. Crixivan (indinavir)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Kaletra (lopinavir-ritonavir)" Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  3. "Product Information. Viracept (nelfinavir)." Agouron Pharma Inc, La Jolla, CA.
  4. "Product Information. Agenerase (amprenavir)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Pk, NC.
  5. "Product Information. Invirase (saquinavir)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Reyataz (atazanavir)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  7. "Product Information. Aptivus (tipranavir)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
  8. "Product Information. Norvir (ritonavir)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  9. "Product Information. Lexiva (fosamprenavir)." GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  10. "Product Information. Fortovase (saquinavir)" Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
View all 10 references
Major

Tipranavir (Includes Tipranavir) ↔ Hepatotoxicity

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

The use of tipranavir is contraindicated in patients with moderate to severe (Child-Pugh Class B and C) hepatic impairment. Tipranavir is primarily metabolized by the liver and may accumulate substantially in such patients. In addition, tipranavir coadministered with ritonavir 200 mg has been associated with reports of clinical hepatitis and hepatic decompensation, including some fatalities. Most cases occurred in patients with advanced HIV disease taking multiple concomitant medications, thus a causal relationship to tipranavir/ritonavir could not be established. Nevertheless, extra caution is recommended if tipranavir and ritonavir are prescribed to patients with chronic hepatitis B or C coinfection or elevations in liver transaminases, as these patients have an approximately 2.5- fold increased risk of developing further transaminase elevations or hepatic decompensation. In clinical studies, Grade 3 and 4 increases in hepatic transaminases were observed in 6% of healthy volunteers and HIV subjects. Liver function tests should be performed prior to initiating therapy and frequently throughout the duration of treatment. Patients should be advised to promptly discontinue tipranavir/ritonavir therapy and seek medical attention if they experience signs or symptoms suggestive of hepatotoxicity such as fever, rash, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, right upper quadrant pain, dark urine, and jaundice.

References

  1. "Product Information. Aptivus (tipranavir)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
Moderate

Pis (Includes Tipranavir) ↔ Hyperglycemia

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Diabetes Mellitus

New onset or exacerbation of preexisting diabetes mellitus, glucose intolerance, and hyperglycemia have been reported during postmarketing surveillance in HIV patients treated with protease inhibitors (PIs). Frequently, insulin resistance may accompany fat redistribution and serum lipid elevations in what is collectively termed the HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome. Although a causal relationship has not been established, these metabolic disturbances have most often occurred in HIV patients during treatment with potent antiretroviral regimens containing PIs. Patients with or predisposed to glucose disorders should be monitored during PI therapy. Dosage adjustments in insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications may be necessary in patients with diabetes. In some cases, glucose abnormalities persisted despite discontinuation of PI therapy.

References

  1. Hardy H, Esch LD, Morse GD "Glucose disorders associated with HIV and its drug therapy." Ann Pharmacother 35 (2001): 343-51
  2. "Product Information. Viracept (nelfinavir)." Agouron Pharma Inc, La Jolla, CA.
  3. "Product Information. Invirase (saquinavir)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Lexiva (fosamprenavir)." GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  5. Tsiodras S, Mantzoros C, Hammer S, Samore M "Effects of protease inhibitors on hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and lipodystrophy - A 5-year cohort study." Arch Intern Med 160 (2000): 2050-6
  6. Noor MA, Lo JC, Mulligan K, Schwarz JM, Halvorsen RA, Schambelan M, Grunfeld C "Metabolic effects of indinavir in healthy HIV-seronegative men." Aids 15 (2001): f11-8
  7. "Product Information. Crixivan (indinavir)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  8. "Product Information. Kaletra (lopinavir-ritonavir)" Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  9. Dube MP, Johnson DL, Currier JS, Leedom JM "Protease inhibitor-associated hyperglycaemia." Lancet 350 (1997): 713-4
  10. Kaufman MB, Simionatto C "A review of protease inhibitor-induced hyperglycemia." Pharmacotherapy 19 (1999): 114-7
  11. Pujol RM, Domingo P, XavierMatiasGuiu, Francia E, Sanbeat MA, Alomar A, Vazquez G "HIV-1 protease inhibitor-associated partial lipodystrophy: Clinicopathologic review of 14 cases." J Am Acad Dermatol 42 (2000): 193-8
  12. Carr A "HIV protease inhibitor-related lipodystrophy syndrome." Clin Infect Dis 30 (2000): s135-42
  13. Struble K, Piscitelli SC "Syndromes of abnormal fat redistribution and metabolic complications in HIV-infected patients." Am J Health Syst Pharm 56 (1999): 2343-8
  14. Walli R, Demant T "Impaired glucose tolerance and protease inhibitors." Ann Intern Med 129 (1998): 837-8
  15. Mauss S, Wolf E, Jaeger H "Impaired glucose tolerance in HIV-positive patients receiving and those not receiving protease inhibitors." Ann Intern Med 130 (1999): 162-3
  16. Brambilla AM, Novati R, Calori G, et al. "Stavudine or indinavir-containing regimens are associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus in HIV-infected individuals." AIDS 17 (2003): 1993-5
  17. "Product Information. Agenerase (amprenavir)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Pk, NC.
  18. "Product Information. Fortovase (saquinavir)" Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  19. "Product Information. Reyataz (atazanavir)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  20. Qaqish RB, Fisher E, Rublein J, Wohl DA "HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome." Pharmacotherapy 20 (2000): 13-22
  21. "Product Information. Aptivus (tipranavir)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
  22. "Product Information. Norvir (ritonavir)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
View all 22 references
Moderate

Pis (Includes Tipranavir) ↔ Hyperlipidemia

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: History - Myocardial Infarction, Hyperlipidemia, Ischemic Heart Disease

Hyperlipidemia has been observed in 10% of patients receiving ritonavir during clinical trials. Increases of 30% to 40% from baseline have been reported for total cholesterol and 200% to 300% or more for triglycerides. These effects have also been reported during postmarketing experience with other protease inhibitors (PIs) but may be the most dramatic with ritonavir. The clinical significance of these elevations is unclear. Severe hyperlipidemia is known to sometimes cause pancreatitis. In addition, some patients have reportedly developed symptomatic atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease after initiating PI treatment. Patients with preexisting hyperlipidemia may require closer monitoring during PI therapy, and adjustments made accordingly in their lipid-lowering regimen. PI therapy should be administered cautiously in patients with coronary artery disease or a history of ischemic heart disease.

References

  1. "Product Information. Invirase (saquinavir)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Lexiva (fosamprenavir)." GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  3. "Product Information. Crixivan (indinavir)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. "Product Information. Agenerase (amprenavir)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Pk, NC.
  5. "Product Information. Reyataz (atazanavir)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Fortovase (saquinavir)" Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  7. Noor MA, Lo JC, Mulligan K, Schwarz JM, Halvorsen RA, Schambelan M, Grunfeld C "Metabolic effects of indinavir in healthy HIV-seronegative men." Aids 15 (2001): f11-8
  8. Costa A, Pulido F, Rubio R, Cepeda C, Torralba M, Costa JR "Lipid changes in HIV-infected patients who started rescue therapy with an amprenavir/ritonavir-based highly active antiretroviral therapy." AIDS 16 (2002): 1983-4
  9. "Product Information. Norvir (ritonavir)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  10. "Product Information. Aptivus (tipranavir)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
  11. Flynn TE, Bricker LA "Myocardial infarction in HIV-infected men receiving protease inhibitors." Ann Intern Med 131 (1999): 548
  12. Echevarria KL, Hardin TC, Smith JA "Hyperlipidemia associated with protease inhibitor therapy." Ann Pharmacother 33 (1999): 859-63
  13. Segerer S, Bogner JR, Walli R, Loch O, Goebel FD "Hyperlipidemia under treatment with proteinase inhibitors." Infection 27 (1999): 77-81
  14. Sullivan AK, Feher MD, Nelson MR, Gazzard BG "Marked hypertriglyceridaemia associated with ritonavir therapy." AIDS 12 (1998): 1393-4
  15. "Product Information. Viracept (nelfinavir)." Agouron Pharma Inc, La Jolla, CA.
  16. "Product Information. Kaletra (lopinavir-ritonavir)" Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  17. Struble K, Piscitelli SC "Syndromes of abnormal fat redistribution and metabolic complications in HIV-infected patients." Am J Health Syst Pharm 56 (1999): 2343-8
  18. Tsiodras S, Mantzoros C, Hammer S, Samore M "Effects of protease inhibitors on hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and lipodystrophy - A 5-year cohort study." Arch Intern Med 160 (2000): 2050-6
  19. Karmochkine M, Raguin G "Severe coronary artery disease in a young HIV-infected man with no cardiovascular risk factor who was treated with indinavir." AIDS 12 (1998): 2499
View all 19 references

tipranavir drug Interactions

There are 475 drug interactions with tipranavir

tipranavir alcohol/food Interactions

There are 2 alcohol/food interactions with tipranavir

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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