Vascor Side Effects

Generic Name: bepridil

Note: This page contains side effects data for the generic drug bepridil. It is possible that some of the dosage forms included below may not apply to the brand name Vascor.

It is possible that some side effects of Vascor may not have been reported. These can be reported to the FDA here. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

For the Consumer

Applies to bepridil: oral tablet

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking bepridil (the active ingredient contained in Vascor) and call your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment:

  • an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

  • unusually fast or slow heartbeat;

  • fainting or severe dizziness;

  • chest pain;

  • abnormal behavior or psychosis;

  • yellowing of your skin or eyes (jaundice); or

  • swelling of your legs or ankles.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take bepridil and talk to your doctor if you experience

  • unusual fatigue or tiredness;

  • nausea, upset stomach, diarrhea, or constipation;

  • headache;

  • nervousness or mild dizziness;

  • insomnia; or

  • tremor (shaking).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to bepridil: oral tablet

General

Bepridil (the active ingredient contained in Vascor) has generally been well-tolerated. Although adverse side effects have been reported in up to 87% of patients, most were mild to moderate in severity.

Cardiovascular

Serious arrhythmias associated with the use of bepridil (the active ingredient contained in Vascor) have been more prevalent among patients with increased QT segment lengthening (on ECG), hypokalemia, advanced age, and among female patients.

Cardiovascular side effects have been uncommon, but potentially serious. The use of bepridil has been associated with dose-related QT segment prolongation in up to 80% of patients, which may be associated with torsades de pointes in up to 1% of patients and ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation in up to 3% of patients. The manufacturer has recommended that the dose be reduced if the QT interval exceeds 0.52 seconds during treatment.

Palpitations and edema have been reported in 1% to 2% of patients. Exacerbation of congestive heart failure has been associated with the use of bepridil in 1% of patients.

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects have included nausea, dyspepsia, and general abdominal discomfort in up to 20% of patients and diarrhea in 8% of patients.

Rare gastrointestinal side effects have included anorexia, dry mouth, and constipation in less than 4% of patients.

Nervous system

Rare nervous system side effects have included drowsiness, insomnia, and paresthesias in less than 4% of patients.

Nervous system side effects have included headache in 11%, tremor in 5%, dizziness in 15%, nervousness in 7%, and asthenia in 10% to 17% of patients.

Hepatic

Hepatic side effects including elevated serum hepatic enzyme concentrations have been observed in 1% of patients.

Hematologic

Two patients who developed leukopenia were elderly and diabetic. One surviving patient recovered after bepridil (the active ingredient contained in Vascor) was discontinued.

In another case, a 72-year-old man with severe angina pectoris developed a fever and chills associated with an absolute neutrophil count of 35 per mm3 six weeks after switching from diltiazem and nitrates to bepridil and nitrates. A bone marrow biopsy revealed profound myeloid hypoplasia. The patient recovered after discontinuation of bepridil, institution of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and broad-spectrum antibiotics.

Hematologic side effects have been rare. In a study of over 800 patients, 2 with a history of diabetes developed agranulocytosis, one of whom died.

Respiratory

A 72-year-old man with coronary artery disease, status post myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure developed a dry cough and dyspnea 1 week after beginning bepridil (the active ingredient contained in Vascor) Associated findings included hypoxemia, chest X-ray evidence of a left perihilar infiltrate, and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis per a transbronchial biopsy. The patient's signs and symptoms resolved after substitution of bepridil with diltiazem and institution of oxygen and prednisone therapy. The recent history of congestive heart failure may have predisposed this patient to the adverse effects of bepridil.

The authors of this case report found no other well-described cases of interstitial pulmonary disease associated with bepridil, but noted approximately four incidentally-described cases of inflammatory pulmonary infiltrates associated with bepridil either from the manufacturer or from large studies.

Respiratory side effects including at least one case of pulmonary fibrosis associated with bepridil has been reported.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill , knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate safety, effectiveness, or appropriateness for any given patient. Drugs.com does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of materials provided. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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