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Lignospan (epinephrine / lidocaine) Disease Interactions

There are 10 disease interactions with Lignospan (epinephrine / lidocaine):

Major

Antiarrhythmics (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Cardiovascular Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Congestive Heart Failure, Hypotension

Antiarrhythmic agents can induce severe hypotension (particularly with IV administration) or induce or worsen congestive heart failure (CHF). Patients with primary cardiomyopathy or inadequately compensated CHF are at increased risk. Antiarrhythmic agents should be administered cautiously and dosage and/or frequency of administration modified in patients with hypotension or adequately compensated CHF. Alternative therapy should be considered unless these conditions are secondary to cardiac arrhythmia.

References

  1. Crouthamel WG "The effect of congestive heart failure on quinidine pharmacokinetics." Am Heart J 90 (1975): 335-9
  2. Halkin H, Meffin P, Melmon KL, Rowland M "Influence of congestive heart failure on blood levels of lidocaine and its active monodeethylated metabolite." Clin Pharmacol Ther 17 (1975): 669-76
  3. Gottlieb SS, Packer M "Deleterious hemodynamic effects of lidocaine in severe congestive heart failure." Am Heart J 118 (1989): 611-2
  4. "Product Information. Quinidex (quinidine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  5. "Product Information. Corvert (ibutilide)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  6. Ravid S, Podrid PJ, Lampert S, Lown B "Congestive heart failure induced by six of the newer antiarrhythmic drugs." J Am Coll Cardiol 14 (1989): 1326-30
  7. "Product Information. Xylocaine (lidocaine)." Astra USA, Westborough, MA.
  8. Thomson P, Melmon K, Richardson J, Cohn K Steinbrunn W, Cudihee R, Rowland M "Lidocaine pharmacokinetics in advanced heart failure, liver disease, and renal failure in humans." Ann Intern Med 78 (1973): 499-508
  9. "Product Information. Cordarone (amiodarone)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  10. Singh SN, Fletcher RD, Fisher SG, et al. "Amiodarone in patients with congestive heart failure and asymptomatic ventricular arrhythmia." N Engl J Med 333 (1995): 77-82
  11. Swiryn S, Kim SS "Quinidine-induced syncope." Arch Intern Med 143 (1983): 314-6
  12. "Product Information. Mexitil (mexiletine)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
  13. "Product Information. Cordarone Intravenous (amiodarone)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  14. Prescott LF, Adjepon-Yamoah KK, Talbot RG "Impaired lignocaine metabolism in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiac failure." Br Med J 1 (1976): 939-41
  15. "Product Information. Adenocard (adenosine)." Fujisawa, Deerfield, IL.
  16. "Product Information. Quiniglute (quinidine)." Berlex, Richmond, CA.
  17. Ochs HR, Grube E, Greenblatt DJ, Arendt R "Intravenous quinidine in congestive cardiomyopathy." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 19 (1981): 173-6
View all 17 references
Major

Antiarrhythmics (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Proarrhythmic Effects

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Arrhythmias

Antiarrhythmic agents can induce or worsen ventricular arrhythmias. Ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and torsades de pointes have occurred in some patients. Patients with underlying cardiac dysfunction, bradycardia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, or high antiarrhythmic serum concentrations are at increased risk for drug-induced arrhythmias. Therapy with antiarrhythmics should be used with extreme caution in patients with or predisposed to arrhythmias. Evidence of improved survival is lacking for use of antiarrhythmic therapy in asymptomatic, non-life-threatening arrhythmias. Therapy with antiarrhythmic agents should be reserved for patients with life-threatening arrhythmias.

References

  1. "Product Information. Adenocard (adenosine)." Fujisawa, Deerfield, IL.
  2. Andrivet P, Beaslay V, Canh VD "Torsades de pointe with flecainide-amiodarone therapy." Intensive Care Med 16 (1990): 342-3
  3. "Product Information. Tambocor (flecainide)." 3M Pharmaceuticals, St. Paul, MN.
  4. "Product Information. Bretylol (bretylium)." DuPont Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE.
  5. Nora MO, Chandrasekaran K, Hammill SC, Reeder GS "Prolongation of ventricular depolarization: ECG manifestation of mexiletine toxicity." Chest 95 (1989): 925-8
  6. "Product Information. Procan SR (procainamide)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  7. Cheesman M, Ward DE "Exacerbation of ventricular tachycardia by tocainide." Clin Cardiol 8 (1985): 47-50
  8. "Product Information. Cordarone Intravenous (amiodarone)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  9. Lo KS, Gantz KB, Stetson PL, et al "Disopyramide-induced ventricular tachycardia." Arch Intern Med 140 (1980): 413-4
  10. Said SAM, Somer ST, Luttikhuis HAO "Flecainide-induced JT prolongation, t wave inversion and ventricular tachycardia during treatment for symptomatic atrial fibrillation." Int J Cardiol 44 (1994): 285-7
  11. "Product Information. Rhythmol (propafenone)." Knoll Pharmaceutical Company, Whippany, NJ.
  12. Morganroth J, Horowitz LN "Incidence of proarrhythmic effects from quinidine in the outpatient treatment of benign or potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias." Am J Cardiol 56 (1985): 585-7
  13. Ben-Sorek ES, Wiesel J "Ventricular fibrillation following adenosine administration. A case report." Arch Intern Med 153 (1993): 2701-2
  14. Meurer MK "A 21-year-old woman with rapid atrial fibrillation after adenosine administration." J Emerg Nurs 17 (1991): 135-6
  15. Raehl CL, Patel AK, LeRoy M "Drug-induced torsade de pointes." Clin Pharm 4 (1985): 675-90
  16. Boriani G, Biffi M, Frabetti L, Azzolini U, Sabbatani P, Bronzetti G, Capucci A, Magnani B "Ventricular fibrillation after intravenous amiodarone in wolff-parkinson-white syndrome with atrial fibrillation." Am Heart J 131 (1996): 1214-6
  17. Tzivoni D, Keren A, Stern S, Gottlieb S "Disopyramide-induced Torsade de pointes." Arch Intern Med 141 (1981): 946-7
  18. Sulke AN, Holt P, Sowton GE "Acceleration of conduction within an accessory pathway with propafenone." Int J Cardiol 28 (1990): 105-7
  19. Romer M, Candinas R "Adenosine-induced non-sustained polymorphic ventricular tachycardia." Eur Heart J 15 (1994): 281-2
  20. "Product Information. Pronestyl (procainamide)." Apothecon Inc, Plainsboro, NJ.
  21. Damle R, Levine J, Matos J, et al "Efficacy and risks of moricizine in inducible sustained ventricular tachycardia." Ann Intern Med 116 (1992): 375-81
  22. Exner DV, Muzyka T, Gillis AM "Proarrhythmia in patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome after standard doses of intravenous adenosine." Ann Intern Med 122 (1995): 351-2
  23. Cocco G, Strozzi C, Chu D, Pansini R "Torsades de pointes as a manifestation of mexiletine toxicity." Am Heart J 100 (1980): 878-80
  24. Faggiano P, Gardini A, Daloia A, Benedini G, Giordano A "Torsade de pointes occurring early during oral amiodarone treatment." Int J Cardiol 55 (1996): 205-8
  25. "Product Information. Corvert (ibutilide)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  26. Sclarovsky S, Lewin RF, Kracoff O, Strasberg B, Arditti A, Agmon J "Amiodarone-induced polymorphous ventricular tachycardia." Am Heart J 105 (1983): 6-12
  27. Wesley RC Jr, Turnquest P "Torsades de pointe after intravenous adenosine in the presence of prolonged QT syndrome." Am Heart J 123 (1992): 794-6
  28. Hohnloser SH, Vandeloo A, Baedeker F "Efficacy and proarrhythmic hazards of pharmacologic cardioversion of atrial fibrillation: prospective comparison of sotalol versus quinidine." J Am Coll Cardiol 26 (1995): 852-8
  29. "Product Information. Xylocaine (lidocaine)." Astra USA, Westborough, MA.
  30. Au PK, Bhandari AK, Bream R, et al "Proarrhythmic effects of antiarrhythmic drugs during programmed ventricular stimulation in patients without ventricular tachycardia." J Am Coll Cardiol 9 (1987): 389-97
  31. Stavens CS, McGovern B, Garan H, Ruskin JN "Aggravation of electrically provoked ventricular tachycardia during treatment with propafenone." Am Heart J 110 (1985): 24-9
  32. Reed R, Falk JL, O'Brien J "Untoward reaction to adenosine therapy for supraventricular tachycardia." Am J Emerg Med 9 (1991): 566-70
  33. Williamson BD, Hummel J, Niebauer M, Man C, Strickberger SA, Daoud E, Morady F "Bradycardia-facilitated polymorphic ventricular tachycardia caused by amiodarone after radiofrequency modification of atrioventricular conduction." Am Heart J 130 (1995): 399-401
  34. Engler RL, LeWinter M "Tocainide-induced ventricular fibrillation." Am Heart J 101 (1981): 494-6
  35. Anderson JL, Popat KD "Paradoxical ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation after intravenous bretylium therapy." Arch Intern Med 141 (1981): 801-2
  36. Morganroth J, Pratt CM "Prevalence and characteristics of proarrhythmia from moricizine (themozine)." Am J Cardiol 63 (1989): 172-6
  37. Orebaugh SL, Handy M "Intravenous adenosine therapy accelerating rate of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia." Am J Emerg Med 10 (1992): 326-30
  38. Hii JT, Wyse DG, Gillis AM, et al "Propafenone-induced torsade de pointes: cross-reactivity with quinidine." Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 14 (1991): 1568-70
  39. Makkar RR, Fromm BS, Steinman RT, Meissner MD, Lehmann MH "Female gender as a risk factor for torsades de pointes associated with cardiovascular drugs." JAMA 270 (1993): 2590-7
  40. Hohnloser SH, Klingenheben T, Singh BN "Amiodarone-associated proarrhythmic effects - a review with special reference to torsade de pointes tachycardia." Ann Intern Med 121 (1994): 529-35
  41. Chia BL "Disopyramide induced atypical ventricular tachycardia." Aust N Z J Med 10 (1980): 665-8
  42. Riccioni N, Castiglioni M, Bartolomei C "Disopyramide-induced QT prolongation and ventricular tachyarrhythmias." Am Heart J 105 (1983): 870-1
  43. "Product Information. Cordarone (amiodarone)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  44. "Product Information. Ethmozine (moricizine)." DuPont Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE.
  45. Kinney EL, Field EH, Salmon MP, Zelis R "Cardiac arrhythmias associated with disopyramide." N Engl J Med May (1990): 1146
  46. "Product Information. Mexitil (mexiletine)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
  47. "Product Information. Tonocard (tocainide)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  48. "Product Information. Norpace (disopyramide)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
  49. Celiker A, Tokel K, Cil E, Ozkutlu S, Ozme S "Adenosine induced torsades de pointes in a child with congenital long QT syndrome." Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 17 (1994): 1814-7
  50. Schweitzer P, Mark H "Torsade de pointes caused by disopyramide and hypokalemia." Mt Sinai J Med 49 (1982): 110-4
  51. Strickberger SA, Man KC, Daoud EG, et al. "Adenosine-induced atrial arrhythmia: a prospective analysis." Ann Intern Med 127 (1997): 417-22
  52. Silverman AJ, Machado C, Baga JJ, Meissner MD, Lehmann MH, Steinman RT "Adenosine-induced atrial fibrillation." Am J Emerg Med 14 (1996): 300-1
  53. Stratmann H, Walter K, Kennedy H "Torsade de pointes associated with elevated N-acetylprocainamide levels." Am Heart J 109 (1985): 375-6
  54. Buss J, Neuss H, Bilgin Y, Schlepper M "Malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias in association with propafenone treatment." Eur Heart J 6 (1985): 424-8
  55. Nathan AW, Hellestrand KJ, Bexton RS, Camm AJ "Fatal ventricular tachycardia in association with propafenone, a new class IC antiarrhythmic agent." Postgrad Med J 60 (1984): 155-6
  56. Dhein S, Schott M, Gottwald E, Klaus W "Electrocardiological profile and proarrhythmic effects of quinidine, verapamil and their combination: a mapping study." Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol 352 (1995): 94-101
  57. Bauman JL, Bauernfeind RA, Hoff JV, et al "Torsade de pointes due to quinidine: observations in 31 patients." Am Heart J 107 (1984): 425-30
  58. Heisler BE, Ferrier GR "Proarrhythmic actions of flecainide in an isolated tissue model of ischemia and reperfusion." J Pharmacol Exp Ther 279 (1996): 317-24
  59. Strasberg B, Sclarovsky S, Erdberg A, et al "Procainamide-induced polymorphous ventricular tachycardia." Am J Cardiol 47 (1981): 1309-14
  60. Koenig W, Schinz AM "Spontaneous ventricular flutter and fibrillation during quinidine medication." Am Heart J 105 (1983): 863-5
  61. Oberg KC, Otoole MF, Gallastegui JL, Bauman JL "''late'' proarrhythmia due to quinidine." Am J Cardiol 74 (1994): 192-4
  62. Dougherty AH, Gilman JK, Wiggins S, Jalal S, Naccarelli GV "Provocation of atrioventricular reentry tachycardia: a paradoxical effect of adenosine." Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 16 (1993): 8-12
View all 62 references
Major

Lidocaine (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Hepatic Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Lidocaine is rapidly and extensively metabolized by the liver. Less than 10% is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Several inactive and two active forms (MEGX and GX) have been identified. MEGX and GX exhibit antiarrhythmic and convulsant properties. GX accumulates during prolonged intravenous lidocaine infusion. The pharmacokinetic disposition of lidocaine is altered by changes in hepatic function, including hepatic blood flow. Therapy with lidocaine should be administered cautiously and dosing modifications for repeated or loading and maintenance doses may be necessary. Clinical monitoring of cardiac (continuous ECG) is required and serum metabolite concentrations and monitoring hepatic function are recommended.

References

  1. Thomson AH, Elliott HL, Kelman AW, et al "The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lignocaine and MEGX in healthy subjects." J Pharmacokinet Biopharm 15 (1987): 101-15
  2. Huang YS, Lee SD, Deng JF, Wu JC, Lu RH, Lin YF, Wang YJ, Lo KJ "Measuring lidocaine metabolite - monoethylglycinexylidide as a quantitative index of hepatic function in adults with chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis." J Hepatol 19 (1993): 140-7
  3. Barry M, Keeling PW, Weir D, Feely J "Severity of cirrhosis and the relationship of a1-acid glycoprotein concentration to plasma protein binding of lidocaine." Clin Pharmacol Ther 47 (1990): 366-70
  4. Huet P-M, LeLorier J "Effects of smoking and chronic hepatitis B on lidocaine and indocyanine green kinetics." Clin Pharmacol Ther 28 (1980): 208-15
  5. Thomson P, Melmon K, Richardson J, Cohn K Steinbrunn W, Cudihee R, Rowland M "Lidocaine pharmacokinetics in advanced heart failure, liver disease, and renal failure in humans." Ann Intern Med 78 (1973): 499-508
  6. Bauer LA, Brown T, Gibaldi M, et al "Influence of long-term infusions on lidocaine kinetics." Clin Pharmacol Ther 31 (1982): 433-7
  7. Villeneuve JP, Thibeault MJ, Ampelas M, et al "Drug disposition in patients with HBsAg-positive chronic liver disease." Dig Dis Sci 32 (1987): 710-4
  8. Huet PM, Villeneuve JP "Determinants of drug disposition in patients with cirrhosis." Hepatology 3 (1983): 913-8
  9. "Product Information. Xylocaine (lidocaine)." Astra USA, Westborough, MA.
  10. Forrest JA, Finlayson ND, Adjepon-Yamoah KK, Prescott LF "Antipyrine, paracetamol, and lignocaine elimination in chronic liver disease." Br Med J 1 (1977): 1384-7
  11. Colli A, Buccino G, Cocciolo M, et al "Disposition of a flow-limited drug (lidocaine) and a metabolic capacity-limited drug (theophylline) in liver cirrhosis." Clin Pharmacol Ther 44 (1988): 642-9
  12. Shiffman ML, Luketic VA, Sanyal AJ, Duckworth PF, Purdum PP, Contos MJ, Mills AS, Edinboro LE, Poklis A "Hepatic lidocaine metabolism and liver histology in patients with chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis." Hepatology 19 (1994): 933-40
  13. Williams RL, Blaschke TF, Meffin PJ, et al "Influence of viral hepatitis on the disposition of two compounds with high hepatic clearance: lidocaine and indocyanine green." Clin Pharmacol Ther 20 (1976): 290-9
View all 13 references
Major

Lidocaine (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Renal Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction

Lidocaine is primarily eliminated by the kidney. Less than 10% is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Two active metabolites (MEGX and GX) have been identified that exhibit antiarrhythmic and convulsant properties. GX accumulates during prolonged intravenous lidocaine infusion. Serum concentrations of lidocaine and the active metabolites are increased and the half-life prolonged in patients with renal impairment. Therapy with lidocaine should be administered cautiously and dosing modified for repeated or maintenance doses in patients with compromised renal function. Clinical monitoring of cardiac function (continual ECG) is required and serum metabolite concentrations and monitoring renal function are recommended.

References

  1. Collinsworth KA, Strong JM, Atkinson AJ Jr, et al "Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of lidocaine in patients with renal failure." Clin Pharmacol Ther 18 (1975): 59-64
  2. Jacobi J, McGory RW, McCoy H, Matzke GR "Hemodialysis clearance of total and unbound lidocaine." Clin Pharm 2 (1983): 54-7
  3. Thomson PD, Rowland M, Melmon KL "The influence of heart failure, liver disease, and renal failure on the disposition of lidocaine in man." Am Heart J 82 (1971): 417-21
  4. Grossman S, Davis D, Kitchell B, Shand D, Routledge P "Diazepam and lidocaine plasma protein binding in renal disease." Clin Pharmacol Ther 31 (1982): 350-7
  5. Vaziri ND, Saiki JK, Hughes W "Clearance of lidocaine by hemodialysis." South Med J 72 (1979): 1567-8
  6. Eriksson E, Granberg P-O, Ortengren B "Study of renal excretion of prilocaine and lidocaine." Acta Chem Scand 358 (1966): 55-69
  7. Thomson P, Melmon K, Richardson J, Cohn K Steinbrunn W, Cudihee R, Rowland M "Lidocaine pharmacokinetics in advanced heart failure, liver disease, and renal failure in humans." Ann Intern Med 78 (1973): 499-508
  8. "Product Information. Xylocaine (lidocaine)." Astra USA, Westborough, MA.
View all 8 references
Major

Lidocaine (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Seizures

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Seizures

Seizures have occurred during lidocaine therapy and have been associated with the rapid administration of a large intravenous doses or accumulation of active metabolites with maintenance therapy. Therapy with lidocaine should be administered cautiously to patients with or predisposed to seizure disorders. Clinical monitoring of cardiac (continuous ECG) is required, and serum metabolite concentrations are recommended.

References

  1. Wu FL, Razzaghi A, Souney PF "Seizure after lidocaine for bronchoscopy: case report and review of the use of lidocaine in airway anesthesia." Pharmacotherapy 13 (1993): 72-8
  2. Crampton RS, Oriscello RG "Petit and grand mal convulsions during lidocaine hydrochloride treatment of ventricular tachycardia." JAMA 204 (1968): 109-12
  3. Ryan CA, Robertson M, Coe JY "Seizures due to lidocaine toxicity in a child during cardiac catheterization." Pediatr Cardiol 14 (1993): 116-8
  4. "Product Information. Xylocaine (lidocaine)." Astra USA, Westborough, MA.
  5. Fortuna A, Fortuna AO "Convulsion during lignocaine infiltration." Anaesth Intensive Care 21 (1993): 483
  6. Sundaram MB "Seizures after intraurethral instillation of lidocaine." Can Med Assoc J 137 (1987): 219-20
  7. Pelter MA, Vollmer TA, Blum RL "Seizure-like reaction associated with subcutaneous lidocaine injection ." Clin Pharm 8 (1989): 767-8
View all 7 references
Major

Lidocaine (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Sinus/Av Node Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Heart Block

The use of lidocaine is contraindicated in patients with Stokes-Adam syndrome, Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome, or second- or third-degree AV block in the absence of a functional artificial pacemaker, or congenital QT prolongation.

References

  1. Tagliente TM, Jayagopal S "Transient left bundle branch block following lidocaine." Anesth Analg 69 (1989): 545-7
  2. Hilleman DE, Mohiuddin SM, Destache CJ "Lidocaine-induced second-degree mobitz type II heart block." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 19 (1985): 669-73
  3. Keidar S, Grenadier E, Palant A "Sinoatrial arrest due to lidocaine injection in sick sinus syndrome during amiodarone administration." Am Heart J 104 (1982): 1384-5
  4. "Product Information. Xylocaine (lidocaine)." Astra USA, Westborough, MA.
View all 4 references
Major

Sympathomimetics (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Cardiovascular Disease

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Hyperthyroidism, Cardiovascular Disease, Pheochromocytoma

Sympathomimetic agents may cause adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly when used in high dosages and/or in susceptible patients. In cardiac tissues, these agents may produce positive chronotropic and inotropic effects via stimulation of beta- 1 adrenergic receptors. Cardiac output, oxygen consumption, and the work of the heart may be increased. In the peripheral vasculature, vasoconstriction may occur via stimulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. Palpitations, tachycardia, arrhythmia, hypertension, reflex bradycardia, coronary occlusion, cerebral vasculitis, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, and death have been reported. Some of these agents, particularly ephedra alkaloids (ephedrine, ma huang, phenylpropanolamine), may also predispose patients to hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. Therapy with sympathomimetic agents should generally be avoided or administered cautiously in patients with sensitivity to sympathomimetic amines, hyperthyroidism, or underlying cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disorders. These agents should not be used in patients with severe coronary artery disease or severe/uncontrolled hypertension.

References

  1. Horowitz JD, Lang WJ, Howes LG, Fennessy MR, Christophidis N, Rand MJ, Louis WJ "Hypertensive responses induced by phenylpropanolamine in anorectic and decongestant preparations." Lancet 1 (1980): 60-1
  2. Covington TR, Lawson LC, Young LL, eds. "Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs. 10th ed." Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association (1993):
  3. Gordon RD, Ballantine DM, Bachmann AW "Effects of repeated doses of pseudoephedrine on blood pressure and plasma catecholamines in normal subjects and in patients with phaeochromocytoma." Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 19 (1992): 287-90
  4. Frewin DB "Phenylpropanolamine. How safe is it?" Med J Aust 2 (1983): 54-5
  5. Shapiro SR "Hypertension due to anorectic agent." N Engl J Med 280 (1969): 1363
  6. Leo PJ, Hollander JE, Shih RD, Marcus SM "Phenylpropanolamine and associated myocardial injury." Ann Emerg Med 28 (1996): 359-62
  7. American Medical Association, Division of Drugs and Toxicology "Drug evaluations annual 1994." Chicago, IL: American Medical Association; (1994):
  8. Kroenke K, Omori DM, Simmons JO, Wood DR, Meier NJ "The safety of phenylpropanolamine in patients with stable hypertension." Ann Intern Med 111 (1989): 1043-4
  9. Kase CS, Foster TE, Reed JE, Spatz EL, Girgis GN "Intracerebral hemorrhage and phenylpropanolamine use." Neurology 37 (1987): 399-404
  10. Frewin DB, Leonello PP, Frewin ME "Hypertension after ingestion of Trimolets." Med J Aust 2 (1978): 497-8
  11. Noble R "A controlled clinical trial of the cardiovascular and psychological effects of phenylpropanolamine and caffeine." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 22 (1988): 296-9
  12. Kikta DG, Devereaux MW, Chandar K "Intracranial hemorrhages due to phenylpropanolamine." Stroke 16 (1985): 510-2
  13. Lake CR, Zaloga G, Clymer R, Quirk RM, Chernow B "A double dose of phenylpropanolamine causes transient hypertension." Am J Med 85 (1988): 339-43
  14. Edwards M, Russo L, Harwood-Nuss A "Cerebral infarction with a single oral dose of phenylpropanolamine." Am J Emerg Med 5 (1987): 163-4
  15. Johnson DA, Etter HS, Reeves DM "Stroke and phenylpropanolamine use" Lancet 2 (1983): 970
  16. Mansoor GA "Herbs and alternative therapies in the hypertension clinic." Am J Hypertens 14(9 Pt 1) (2001): 971-5
  17. Elliott CF, Whyte JC "Phenylpropanolamine and hypertension." Med J Aust 1 (1981): 715
  18. Pentel PR, Aaron C, Paya C "Therapeutic doses of phenylpropanolamine increase supine systolic blood pressure." Int J Obes 9 (1985): 115-9
  19. Fallis RJ, Fisher M "Cerebral vasculitis and hemorrhage associated with phenylpropanolamine." Neurology 35 (1985): 405-7
  20. McDowell JR, LeBlanc HJ "Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage." West J Med 142 (1985): 688-91
  21. Howrie DL, Wolfson JH "Phenylpropanolamine-induced hypertensive seizures." J Pediatr 102 (1983): 143-5
  22. Williams DM "Phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride" Am Pharm NS30 (1990): 47-50
  23. Samenuk D, Link MS, Homoud MK, et al. "Adverse cardiovascular events temporally associated with ma huang, an herbal source of ephedrine." Mayo Clin Proc 77 (2002): 12-6
  24. Loizou LA, Hamilton JG, Tsementzis SA "Intracranial haemorrhage in association with pseudoephedrine overdose." J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 45 (1982): 471-2
  25. Bruno A, Nolte KB, Chapin J "Stroke associated with ephedrine use." Neurology 43 (1993): 1313-6
  26. Lee KY, Beilin LJ, Vandongen R "Severe hypertension after ingestion of an appetite suppressant (phenylpropanolamine) with indomethacin." Lancet 1 (1979): 1110-1
  27. Horowitz JD, McNeil JJ, Sweet B, Mendelsohn FA, Louis WJ "Hypertension and postural hypotension induced by phenylpropanolamine (Trimolets)." Med J Aust 1 (1979): 175-6
  28. Stoessl AJ, Young GB, Feasby TE "Intracerebral haemorrhage and angiographic beading following ingestion of catecholaminergics." Stroke 16 (1985): 734-6
  29. Lee KY, Beilin LJ, Vandongen R "Severe hypertension after administration of phenylpropanolamine" Med J Aust 1 (1979): 525-6
  30. O'Connell MB, Gross CR "The effect of multiple doses of phenylpropanolamine on the blood pressure of patients whose hypertension was controlled with beta blockers." Pharmacotherapy 11 (1991): 376-81
  31. McEwen J "Phenylpropanolamine-associated hypertension after the use of "over- the-counter" appetite-suppressant products." Med J Aust 2 (1983): 71-3
  32. Wiener I, Tilkian AG, Palazzolo M "Coronary artery spasm and myocardial infarction in a patient with normal coronary arteries: temporal relationship to pseudoephedrine ingestion." Cathet Cardiovasc Diagn 20 (1990): 51-3
  33. O'Connell MB, Gross CR "The effect of single-dose phenylpropanolamine on blood pressure in patients with hypertension controlled by beta blockers." Pharmacotherapy 10 (1990): 85-91
  34. Dickerson J, Perrier D, Mayersohn M, Bressler R "Dose tolerance and pharmacokinetic studies of L (+) pseudoephedrine capsules in man." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 14 (1978): 253-9
  35. Bernstein E, Diskant BM "Phenylpropanolamine: a potentially hazardous drug." Ann Emerg Med 11 (1982): 311-5
  36. To LB, Sangster JF, Rampling D, Cammens I "Ephedrine-induced cardiomyopathy." Med J Aust 2 (1980): 35-6
  37. Maher LM, Peterson PL, Dela-Cruz C "Postpartum intracranial hemorrhage and phenylpropanolamine use." Neurology 37 (1987): 1886,1890
  38. Caperton E "Raynaud's phenomenon. Role of diet pills and cold remedies." Postgrad Med 73 (1983): 291-2
  39. Gill ND, Shield A, Blazevich AJ, Zhou S, Weatherby RP "Muscular and cardiorespiratory effects of pseudoephedrine in human athletes." Br J Clin Pharmacol 50 (2000): 205-13
  40. Mariani PJ "Pseudoephedrine-induced hypertensive emergency: treatment with labetalol." Am J Emerg Med 4 (1986): 141-2
  41. Teh AY "Phenylpropanolamine and hypertension" Med J Aust 2 (1979): 425-6
  42. Pentel PR, Mikell FL, Zavoral JH "Myocardial injury after phenylpropanolamine ingestion." Br Heart J 47 (1982): 51-4
  43. Rosen RA "Angina associated with pseudoephedrine ." Ann Emerg Med 10 (1981): 230-1
  44. Lake CR, Gallant S, Masson E, Miller P "Adverse drug effects attributed to phenylpropanolamine: a review of 142 case reports." Am J Med 89 (1990): 195-208
  45. Humberstone PM "Hypertension from cold remedies." Br Med J 1 (1969): 846
  46. Maher LM, Peterson PL, Dela-Cruz C "Postpartum intracranial hemorrhage and phenylpropanolamine use" Neurology 37 (1987): 1686
  47. Haller CA, Benowitz NL "Adverse cardiovascular and central nervous system events associated with dietary supplements containing ephedra alkaloids." N Engl J Med 343 (2000): 1833-8
  48. Dowse R, Scherzinger SS, Kanfer I "Serum concentrations of phenylpropanolamine and associated effects on blood pressure in normotensive subjects: a pilot-study." Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther Toxicol 28 (1990): 205-10
  49. Gibson GJ, Warrell DA "Hypertensive crises and phenylpropanolamine." Lancet 2 (1972): 492-3
  50. "Product Information. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  51. Lake CR, Zaloga G, Bray J, Rosenberg D, Chernow B "Transient hypertension after two phenylpropanolamine diet aids and the effects of caffeine: a placebo-controlled follow-up study." Am J Med 86 (1989): 427-32
  52. Finton CK, Barton M, Chernow B "Possible adverse effects of phenylpropanolamine (diet pills) on sympathetic nervous system function--caveat emptor!" Mil Med 147 (1982): 1072
  53. Kizer KW "Intracranial hemorrhage associated with overdose of decongestant containing phenylpropanolamine" Am J Emerg Med 2 (1984): 180-1
  54. Clark JE, Simon WA "Cardiac arrhythmias after phenylpropanolamine ingestion." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 17 (1983): 737-8
  55. Wooten MR, Khangure MS, Murphy MJ "Intracerebral hemorrhage and vasculitis related to ephedrine abuse." Ann Neurol 13 (1983): 337-40
  56. Chin C, Choy M "Cardiomyopathy induced by phenylpropanolamine." J Pediatr 123 (1993): 825-7
View all 56 references
Moderate

Antiarrhythmics (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Electrolyte Imbalance

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Hypokalemia, Hyperkalemia, Magnesium Imbalance

Electrolyte imbalance can alter the therapeutic effectiveness of antiarrhythmic agents. Hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia can reduce the effectiveness of antiarrhythmic agents. In some cases, these disorders can exaggerate the degree of QTc prolongation and increase the potential for torsades de pointes. Hyperkalemia can potentiate the toxic effects of antiarrhythmic agents. Electrolyte imbalance should be corrected prior to initiating antiarrhythmic therapy. Clinical monitoring of cardiac function and electrolyte concentrations is recommended.

References

  1. "Product Information. Tonocard (tocainide)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Norpace (disopyramide)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
  3. "Product Information. Quinidex (quinidine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  4. "Product Information. Mexitil (mexiletine)." Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
  5. "Product Information. Pronestyl (procainamide)." Apothecon Inc, Plainsboro, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Xylocaine (lidocaine)." Astra USA, Westborough, MA.
  7. "Product Information. Corvert (ibutilide)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  8. "Product Information. Ethmozine (moricizine)." DuPont Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE.
  9. "Product Information. Tambocor (flecainide)." 3M Pharmaceuticals, St. Paul, MN.
  10. "Product Information. Cordarone Intravenous (amiodarone)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  11. "Product Information. Rhythmol (propafenone)." Knoll Pharmaceutical Company, Whippany, NJ.
  12. "Product Information. Procan SR (procainamide)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  13. "Product Information. Cordarone (amiodarone)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
View all 13 references
Moderate

Epinephrine (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Parkinson's Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Parkinsonism, Neurologic Disorder

Epinephrine should be administered with caution to patients with Parkinson's disease as these patients may experience psychomotor agitation or notice a temporary worsening of symptoms.

Moderate

Sympathomimetics (Includes Lignospan) ↔ Diabetes

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Diabetes Mellitus

Sympathomimetic agents may cause increases in blood glucose concentrations. These effects are usually transient and slight but may be significant with dosages higher than those normally recommended. Therapy with sympathomimetic agents should be administered cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus. Closer monitoring of blood glucose concentrations may be appropriate.

References

  1. "Product Information. Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  2. American Medical Association, Division of Drugs and Toxicology "Drug evaluations annual 1994." Chicago, IL: American Medical Association; (1994):
  3. Covington TR, Lawson LC, Young LL, eds. "Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs. 10th ed." Washington, DC: American Pharmaceutical Association (1993):
  4. Williams DM "Phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride" Am Pharm NS30 (1990): 47-50
View all 4 references

Lignospan (epinephrine / lidocaine) drug Interactions

There are 532 drug interactions with Lignospan (epinephrine / lidocaine)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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