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is a condition that causes you to have too little amniotic fluid during pregnancy. This fluid surrounds your unborn baby in the womb. Oligohydramnios can happen at any time during the pregnancy. It is most common in the third trimester.

Why amniotic fluid is important during pregnancy:

Amniotic fluid helps your baby grow and develop normally. The fluid does the following during pregnancy:

  • Protects your baby from injury
  • Protects the umbilical cord and keeps it from being pinched
  • Helps your baby's lungs develop, and helps him exercise his muscles and digestive system
  • Keeps your baby's temperature regular and protected from infection
  • Prevents contractions from starting early

Common signs and symptoms of oligohydramnios:

  • Less amniotic fluid than expected for the trimester
  • Smaller uterus size than expected for the trimester
  • Smaller abdomen size than expected for the trimester
  • Slow heartbeat of the baby
  • Baby is easy to feel when a healthcare provider touches the mother's abdomen
  • Fewer movements than usual from the baby
  • Amniotic fluid leaking from the mother's vagina

Seek care immediately if:

  • You have clear fluid leaking from your vagina.
  • You have heavy bleeding or any bleeding from your vagina for more than 24 hours.
  • You have vision changes or problems, such as blurred vision.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • Your baby is moving less than usual.
  • You have a fever or chills.
  • You have contractions before you are due.
  • You have cramps, pressure in your abdomen, or a low backache.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.


may include any of the following:

  • Delivery may be recommended if your baby is close to being full term.
  • An amnioinfusion is a procedure to inject fluid into the womb. The fluid may help take pressure off the umbilical cord. During labor, your healthcare provider puts a catheter (thin tube) through your cervix. Fluid is put through the catheter and into the womb.

Risks of oligohydramnios:

Your baby's lungs may not develop correctly. He may be born smaller than expected. The umbilical cord may be pinched. This may prevent oxygen from getting to his brain and can cause brain damage. Your baby may breathe in meconium (his first bowel movement) during delivery. This can be life-threatening. Meconium may stain the amniotic fluid. He may be born with clubfoot, or the bridge of his nose may be flattened. You may need to have a cesarean section (C-section). You may have a miscarriage or stillbirth.

Care for yourself until delivery:

  • Drink more water to stay hydrated. Ask your healthcare provider how much liquid to drink each day.
  • Bed rest may be needed if you are not ready to deliver. Your healthcare provider may recommend bed rest for several weeks of your pregnancy.

Lower your risk for oligohydramnios in a future pregnancy:

  • Do not smoke. Nicotine in cigarettes increases the risk for PROM or problems with the placenta. Nicotine also causes low birth weight and other medical problems for the baby. Do not use e-cigarettes or smokeless tobacco in place of cigarettes or to help you quit. They still contain nicotine. Ask your healthcare provider for information if you currently smoke and need help quitting.
  • Eat a variety of healthy foods. Healthy foods include fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, lean meats, and beans. Healthy foods can help you gain a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy, and prevent diabetes.
  • Take prenatal vitamins as directed. The vitamins should contain at least 4,000 micrograms of folic acid. Folic acid helps prevent birth defects such as spina bifida. Your healthcare provider can help you choose a prenatal vitamin that is right for you.
  • Drink liquids as directed. More liquid can help prevent dehydration and high blood pressure. Liquids can help prevent PROM. PROM can cause fluid to leak out of the amniotic sac.
  • Control diabetes or other medical conditions. Diabetes can cause problems for your baby, such as too much weight gain. If you have diabetes, work with your healthcare provider to manage your blood sugar levels before and during your next pregnancy.

Follow up with your healthcare provider as directed:

You may need tests every 1 to 3 weeks. Go to all follow-up visits. Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

© 2016 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.