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I have a yeast infection and I want to take diflucan can I safely take trazadone for my sleep probs?

3 Answers

mludwig54 12 Apr 2014

I honestly don't see any reason why you couldn't. It doesn't show any adverse effects between the 2. I am also on Trazadone as part of my Narcolepsy treatment, and Difflucan is for yeast infections. I've taken that before as well. I found no contraindications for taking both the 'Difflucan and Trazadone' together. ♥

Votes: +0
mludwig54 12 Apr 2014

I checked on this wonderful website,

https://www.drugs.com/drug-interactions/diflucan-with-trazodone-1096-630-2228-0.html?professional=1

and from what I read, Trazadone itself is not considered a 'safe' drug to combine with anything, but if used properly under Physicians instructions I saw no conflict, just the usual 'safety' remarks when a drug like Trazadone is part of the subject. The info below is about Trazadone, I saw nothing regarding Difflucan interaction, only that the recommendation is to not combine Trazadone with anything else. If anyone has other info posted somewhere that is reliable, please comment. I got my information here:
fluconazole ↔ trazodone

Drug Interaction Classification

Expand...

** The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Applies to:Diflucan (fluconazole) and trazodone
GENERALLY AVOID: Trazodone may cause prolongation of the QT interval. Theoretically, coadministration with other agents that can prolong the QT interval may result in additive effects and increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias including torsade de pointes and sudden death. In experimental models, trazodone has been found to inhibit hERG-encoded cardiac potassium channels responsible for the rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr)--an action that is considered a predictor of drug-induced QT prolongation. However, the extent to which trazodone may affect cardiac repolarization in clinical use has not been adequately studied. There have been postmarketing reports of torsade de pointes associated with immediate-release trazodone following overdose and in the presence of multiple confounding factors, even at dosages of 100 mg/day or less. In general, the risk of an individual agent or a combination of agents causing ventricular arrhythmia in association with QT prolongation is largely unpredictable but may be increased by certain underlying risk factors such as congenital long QT syndrome, cardiac disease, and electrolyte disturbances (e.g., hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia). In addition, the extent of drug-induced QT prolongation is dependent on the particular drug(s) involved and dosage(s) of the drug(s).

MANAGEMENT: Coadministration of trazodone with other drugs that can prolong the QT interval should generally be avoided. Caution and clinical monitoring are recommended if concomitant use is required. Trazodone should also not be used in patients with risk factors for QT prolongation. Hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia should be corrected prior to initiation of trazodone treatment and periodically monitored. Patients should be advised to seek prompt medical attention if they experience symptoms that could indicate the occurrence of torsade de pointes such as dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, palpitation, irregular heart rhythm, shortness of breath, or syncope.

References

"Product Information. Oleptro (traZODone)." Labopharm Inc, Laval, AL.
Mazur A, Strasberg B, Kusniec J, Sclarovsky S "QT prolongation and polymorphous ventricular tachycardia associated with trasodone-amiodarone combination." Int J Cardiol 52 (1995): 27-9
Antonelli D, Atar S, Freedberg NA, Rosenfeld T "Torsade de pointes in patients on chronic amiodarone treatment: contributing factors and drug interactions." Isr Med Assoc J 7 (2005): 163-5
Levenson JL "Prolonged QT interval after trazodone overdose." Am J Psychiatry 156 (1999): 969-70
Dattilo PB, Nordin C "Prolonged QT associated with an overdose of trazodone." J Clin Psychiatry 68 (2007): 1309-10
Goodnick PJ, Jerry J, Parra F "Psychotropic drugs and the ECG: focus on the QTc interval." Expert Opin Pharmacother 3 (2002): 479-98
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See also...

Diflucan Drug Interactions
Diflucan General Consumer Information
Trazodone Drug Interactions
trazodone extended-release tablets General Consumer Information
Drug Interactions Checker
Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2014 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Tina57 12 Apr 2014

fluconazole ↔ trazodone

Applies to: Diflucan (fluconazole), trazodone

Talk to your doctor before using traZODone together with fluconazole. Combining these medications can increase the risk of an irregular heart rhythm that may be serious. Your doctor may be able to prescribe alternatives that do not interact, or you may need a dose adjustment or special monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. You should seek immediate medical attention if you develop sudden dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, shortness of breath, or fast or pounding heartbeats during treatment with these medications, whether together or alone. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Votes: +0
smileyhappy 12 Apr 2014

Hi there,
Yes I have before and it is fine.

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