ranitidine

Pronunciation

Generic Name: ranitidine (ra NI ti deen)
Brand Name: Taladine, Zantac, Zantac 150, Zantac 300, Zantac 75, Zantac EFFERdose, Zantac GELdose, Zantac 300 GELdose, Acid Control 75

What is ranitidine?

Ranitidine is in a group of drugs called histamine-2 blockers. Ranitidine works by reducing the amount of acid your stomach produces.

Ranitidine is used to treat and prevent ulcers in the stomach and intestines. It also treats conditions in which the stomach produces too much acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Ranitidine also treats gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions in which acid backs up from the stomach into the esophagus, causing heartburn.

Ranitidine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about ranitidine?

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ranitidine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have kidney disease, liver disease, or porphyria.

Slideshow: Is it Safe to Give Human Medicine to Pets?

Always get your pet's drug and dose recommendation from the veterinarian.

Using ranitidine may increase your risk of developing pneumonia. Symptoms of pneumonia include chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, and coughing up green or yellow mucus. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing pneumonia.

Ranitidine granules and effervescent tablets must be dissolved in water before you take them.

Your doctor may recommend an antacid to help relieve pain. Carefully follow your doctor's directions about the type of antacid to use, and when to use it.

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach.

It may take up to 8 weeks of using this medicine before your ulcer heals. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 weeks of treatment.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using ranitidine?

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to ranitidine.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

  • kidney disease;

  • liver disease; or

  • porphyria.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

Ranitidine passes into breast milk. Do not take ranitidine without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Using ranitidine may increase your risk of developing pneumonia. Symptoms of pneumonia include chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, and coughing up green or yellow mucus. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of developing pneumonia.

The ranitidine effervescent tablet may contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of ranitidine if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

How should I take ranitidine?

Take exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Your doctor may recommend an antacid to help relieve pain. Carefully follow your doctor's directions about the type of antacid to use, and when to use it.

Do not crush, chew, or break the ranitidine effervescent tablet, and do not allow it to dissolve on your tongue. The 25-milligram effervescent tablet must be dissolved in at least 1 teaspoon of water before swallowing. The150-milligram effervescent tablet should be dissolved in 6 to 8 ounces of water.

Allow the ranitidine effervescent tablet to dissolve completely in the water, and then drink the entire mixture. If you are giving this medicine to a child, you may draw the liquid mixture into a medicine dropper and empty the dropper into the child's mouth.

Ranitidine granules should be mixed with 6 to 8 ounces of water before drinking.

Measure ranitidine liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

It may take up to 8 weeks before your ulcer heals. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 6 weeks of treatment.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using ranitidine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include lack of coordination, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking ranitidine?

Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach.

Ranitidine side effects

Stop using ranitidine and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking ranitidine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • chest pain, fever, feeling short of breath, coughing up green or yellow mucus;

  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;

  • fast or slow heart rate;

  • problems with your vision;

  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • headache (may be severe);

  • drowsiness, dizziness;

  • sleep problems (insomnia);

  • decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm; or

  • swollen or tender breasts (in men);

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain; or

  • diarrhea or constipation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Ranitidine dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer:

Oral: 150 mg 2 times a day, or 300 mg once a day after the evening meal or at bedtime.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 6.25 mg/hour over 24 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Dyspepsia:

75 mg orally once daily (Over-the-counter) 30 to 60 minutes before meal. Dose may be increased to 75 mg twice daily. Maximum duration of therapy if self-medicating is 14 days.

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis:

150 mg orally once a day at bedtime.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer Maintenance:

150 mg orally once a day at bedtime.

Usual Adult Dose for Erosive Esophagitis:

Oral:
Initial: 150 mg 4 times a day.
Maintenance: 150 mg twice daily.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 6.25 mg/hour over 24 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis:

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 6.25 mg/hour over 24 hours. Titrate to maintain gastric pH >=4.0.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage:

Parenteral: 50 mg IV loading dose, followed by 6.25 mg/hr continuous IV infusion titrated to gastric pH >7.0 for treatment.

Usual Adult Dose for Surgical Prophylaxis:

Study (n=80) - Premedication in Thoracotomy to reduce GER:
150 mg orally 2 hours before surgery.

Usual Adult Dose for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome:

Oral: 150 mg 2 times a day initially. Adjust dose to control gastric acid secretion. Doses up to 6 g per day have been used.

Parenteral: 1 mg/kg/hour administered as a continuous IV infusion to a maximum of 2.5 mg/kg/hour (infusion rates up to 220 mg/hour have been used).

Usual Adult Dose for Pathological Hypersecretory Conditions:

Oral: 150 mg 2 times a day initially. Adjust dose to control gastric acid secretion. Doses up to 6 g per day have been used.

Parenteral: 1 mg/kg/hour administered as a continuous IV infusion to a maximum of 2.5 mg/kg/hour (infusion rates up to 220 mg/hour have been used).

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease:

Oral: 150 mg twice daily.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer:

Benign Gastric Ulcer -
Oral: 150 mg twice a day.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Duodenal Ulcer:

1 month to 16 years:

IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day IV

Oral:
Treatment: 4 to 8 mg/kg twice daily, every 12 hours
Maximum: 300 mg/day orally
Maintenance: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day orally once daily
Maximum: 150 mg/day orally

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastric Ulcer:

1 month to 16 years:

IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day IV

Oral:
Treatment: 4 to 8 mg/kg twice daily, every 12 hours
Maximum: 300 mg/day orally
Maintenance: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day orally once daily
Maximum: 150 mg/day orally

Usual Pediatric Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis:

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day

Oral: 2 to 4 mg/kg once daily, not to exceed 150 mg/24 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastric Ulcer Maintenance:

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day

Oral: 2 to 4 mg/kg once daily, not to exceed 150 mg/24 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease:

Neonatal:
IV: 1.5 mg/kg IV as a loading dose followed 12 hours later with 1.5 to 2 mg/kg/day IV divided every 12 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 0.04 to 0.08 mg/kg/hour (1 to 2 mg/kg/day) after a loading dose of 1.5 mg/kg has been given.
Continuous IV infusion: Loading dose: 1.5 mg/kg/dose, followed by 0.04 to 0.08 mg/kg/hour infusion (or 1 to 2 mg/kg/day).
Oral: 2 mg/kg/day divided into 2 doses, administered every 12 hours.

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day. Alternatively, an initial IV bolus dose of 1 mg/kg given once, followed by a constant IV infusion at a rate of 0.08 to 0.17 mg/kg/hour (2 to 4 mg/kg/day) may be administered.

Oral: 4 to 10 mg/kg/day administered in 2 divided doses, every 12 hours.
Maximum: 300 mg orally day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Erosive Esophagitis:

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day. Alternatively, an initial IV bolus dose of 1 mg/kg given once, followed by a constant IV infusion at a rate of 0.08 to 0.17 mg/kg/hour (2 to 4 mg/kg/day) may be administered.

Oral: 4 to 10 mg/kg/day administered in 2 divided doses, every 12 hours.
Maximum: 300 mg orally day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dyspepsia:

Children greater than or equal to 12 years:
75 mg orally once 30 to 60 minutes before eating food or drinking beverages which cause heartburn.
Maximum: 150 mg/24 hours
Duration of therapy: Do not use for more than 14 days

What other drugs will affect ranitidine?

Before taking ranitidine, tell your doctor if you are taking triazolam (Halcion). You may not be able to use ranitidine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs that can interact with ranitidine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about ranitidine.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 2010-12-15, 5:01:39 PM.

Hide
(web5)