Ranitidine Dosage

This dosage information may not include all the information needed to use Ranitidine safely and effectively. See additional information for Ranitidine.

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer

Oral: 150 mg 2 times a day, or 300 mg once a day after the evening meal or at bedtime.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 6.25 mg/hour over 24 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Dyspepsia

75 mg orally once daily (Over-the-counter) 30 to 60 minutes before meal. Dose may be increased to 75 mg twice daily. Maximum duration of therapy if self-medicating is 14 days.

Usual Adult Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis

150 mg orally once a day at bedtime.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer Maintenance

150 mg orally once a day at bedtime.

Usual Adult Dose for Erosive Esophagitis

Oral:
Initial: 150 mg 4 times a day.
Maintenance: 150 mg twice daily.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 6.25 mg/hour over 24 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 6.25 mg/hour over 24 hours. Titrate to maintain gastric pH >=4.0.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

Parenteral: 50 mg IV loading dose, followed by 6.25 mg/hr continuous IV infusion titrated to gastric pH >7.0 for treatment.

Usual Adult Dose for Surgical Prophylaxis

Study (n=80) - Premedication in Thoracotomy to reduce GER:
150 mg orally 2 hours before surgery.

Usual Adult Dose for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Oral: 150 mg 2 times a day initially. Adjust dose to control gastric acid secretion. Doses up to 6 g per day have been used.

Parenteral: 1 mg/kg/hour administered as a continuous IV infusion to a maximum of 2.5 mg/kg/hour (infusion rates up to 220 mg/hour have been used).

Usual Adult Dose for Pathological Hypersecretory Conditions

Oral: 150 mg 2 times a day initially. Adjust dose to control gastric acid secretion. Doses up to 6 g per day have been used.

Parenteral: 1 mg/kg/hour administered as a continuous IV infusion to a maximum of 2.5 mg/kg/hour (infusion rates up to 220 mg/hour have been used).

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Oral: 150 mg twice daily.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Gastric Ulcer

Benign Gastric Ulcer -
Oral: 150 mg twice a day.

Parenteral: 50 mg, IV or IM, every 6 to 8 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Duodenal Ulcer

1 month to 16 years:

IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day IV

Oral:
Treatment: 4 to 8 mg/kg twice daily, every 12 hours
Maximum: 300 mg/day orally
Maintenance: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day orally once daily
Maximum: 150 mg/day orally

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastric Ulcer

1 month to 16 years:

IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day IV

Oral:
Treatment: 4 to 8 mg/kg twice daily, every 12 hours
Maximum: 300 mg/day orally
Maintenance: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day orally once daily
Maximum: 150 mg/day orally

Usual Pediatric Dose for Duodenal Ulcer Prophylaxis

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day

Oral: 2 to 4 mg/kg once daily, not to exceed 150 mg/24 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastric Ulcer Maintenance

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day

Oral: 2 to 4 mg/kg once daily, not to exceed 150 mg/24 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

Neonatal:
IV: 1.5 mg/kg IV as a loading dose followed 12 hours later with 1.5 to 2 mg/kg/day IV divided every 12 hours. Alternatively, a continuous IV infusion may be administered at a rate of 0.04 to 0.08 mg/kg/hour (1 to 2 mg/kg/day) after a loading dose of 1.5 mg/kg has been given.
Continuous IV infusion: Loading dose: 1.5 mg/kg/dose, followed by 0.04 to 0.08 mg/kg/hour infusion (or 1 to 2 mg/kg/day).
Oral: 2 mg/kg/day divided into 2 doses, administered every 12 hours.

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day. Alternatively, an initial IV bolus dose of 1 mg/kg given once, followed by a constant IV infusion at a rate of 0.08 to 0.17 mg/kg/hour (2 to 4 mg/kg/day) may be administered.

Oral: 4 to 10 mg/kg/day administered in 2 divided doses, every 12 hours.
Maximum: 300 mg orally day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Erosive Esophagitis

1 month to 16 years:
IV: 2 to 4 mg/kg/day divided every 6 to 8 hours
Maximum: 200 mg/day. Alternatively, an initial IV bolus dose of 1 mg/kg given once, followed by a constant IV infusion at a rate of 0.08 to 0.17 mg/kg/hour (2 to 4 mg/kg/day) may be administered.

Oral: 4 to 10 mg/kg/day administered in 2 divided doses, every 12 hours.
Maximum: 300 mg orally day

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dyspepsia

Children greater than or equal to 12 years:
75 mg orally once 30 to 60 minutes before eating food or drinking beverages which cause heartburn.
Maximum: 150 mg/24 hours
Duration of therapy: Do not use for more than 14 days

Renal Dose Adjustments

CrCl less than 50 mL/min:
Oral: 150 mg every 24 hours. Dosing may be increased further with caution.

IV: 50 mg every 18 to 24 hours IV or by continuous IV infusion. Dosing may be increased further with caution.

Monitoring of renal function is recommended.

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

Ranitidine injection may be used in some hospitalized patients with pathological hypersecretory conditions or intractable duodenal ulcers, or as an alternative to the oral dosage form for short-term use in patients who are unable to take oral medication. Generally, the dosage should not exceed 400 mg/day.

Short-term treatment of active duodenal ulcer: most patients heal within 4 weeks. There are no data on the use of ranitidine in uncomplicated duodenal ulcer for periods longer than 8 weeks.

Short-term treatment of active, benign gastric ulcer: most patients heal within 6 weeks. There are no data on the use of ranitidine in uncomplicated benign gastric ulcer for periods longer than 6 weeks.

Maintenance therapy for gastric and duodenal ulcer at reduced dosage after healing of acute ulcers: There are no data on the use of ranitidine for longer than 1 year.

Maintenance of healing of erosive esophagitis: There are no data for the use of ranitidine beyond 48 weeks.

Precautions

Symptomatic response to ranitidine does not rule out the possibility of gastrointestinal malignancy.

Dosage adjustments are recommended in patients with creatinine clearance less than 50 mL/min, and periodic monitoring of renal function is recommended.

Caution should be exercised when administering ranitidine to patients with hepatic dysfunction since ranitidine is metabolized in the liver.

Ranitidine should be avoided in patients with a history of acute porphyria because of rare reports that suggest that ranitidine may precipitate acute porphyric attacks in patients with acute porphyria.

Caution should be exercised when administering ranitidine intravenously to patients with contributing factors predisposing them to cardiac rhythm disturbances. Bradycardia has been reported in association with rapid intravenous administration of ranitidine.

Elevations in SGPT have been reported with the administration of intravenous H2 antagonists, for 5 days or longer, at doses larger than recommended.

Ranitidine may produce false-positive tests results for urine protein with Multistix (R). Testing with sulfosalicylic acid is recommended.

The efferdose tablets should not be chewed, swallowed whole, or dissolved on the tongue. These tablets contain phenylalanine.

Agents in this class of drugs (H2 antagonists) have not demonstrated unequivocal efficacy in the treatment of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, nor are they approved by the FDA for use in this setting. However, some clinicians use intravenous H2 antagonists as part of the therapeutic approach to treating upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

Safety and efficacy in pediatric patients for the treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions or the maintenance of healing of erosive esophagitis have not been established. Safety and efficacy in neonates (less than 1 month of age) have not been determined.

Dialysis

Hemodialysis reduces the level of ranitidine. Doses should be administered at the end of hemodialysis session.

Other Comments

Agents in this class of drugs (H2 antagonists) have not demonstrated unequivocal efficacy in the treatment of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, nor are they approved by the FDA for use in this setting. However, some clinicians use intravenous H2 antagonists as part of the therapeutic approach to treating upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

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