Oxycodone Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Geriatric Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Pain

Initial:
Immediate Release (IR): 5 mg to 15 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours
Controlled Release (CR): 10 mg orally every 12 hours.

Maintenance:
IR: 10 mg to 30 mg orally every 4 hours. Doses greater than 30 mg are rarely needed and should be used with great caution.
CR: 20 mg to 640 mg per day in patients with cancer pain. The average total daily dose is approximately 105 mg per day. Cancer patients with severe pain may require "as needed" rescue doses of the immediate-release form of oxycodone to supplement the controlled-release form.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Pain

Initial:
Immediate Release (IR): 2.5 mg orally every 6 hours

Maintenance:
IR: Increase dose slowly as needed. Doses greater than 30 mg are rarely needed and should be used with great caution.
CR: 20 mg to 640 mg per day in patients with cancer pain. The average total daily dose is approximately 105 mg per day. Cancer patients with severe pain may require "as needed" rescue doses of the immediate-release form of oxycodone to supplement the controlled-release form.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pain

Greater than 1 year and less than 50 kg: 0.05 mg to 0.15 mg/kg/dose every 4 to 6 hours as needed.
Greater than 1 year and greater than or equal to 50 kg: Start at 5 mg orally every 6 hours as needed, then dose may be titrated up to 10 mg orally every 3 to 4 hours.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Creatinine Clearance less than 60 mL/minute: Start conservatively and titrate dosage carefully to desired effect.

Liver Dose Adjustments

Initial: Give one-third to one-half of the usual dose; titrate dosage carefully to desired effect.

Dose Adjustments

The dose should be adjusted according to severity of pain, patient response and patient size.

As needed "rescue doses" of immediate release oxycodone may be needed for patients with cancer pain. Rescue doses should be one-fourth to one-third of the 12-hour controlled release oxycodone dose.

Patients taking doses greater than 60 mg/day should be tapered off the medication over several days.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Oxycodone is not for use:
-As an as needed (prn) analgesic
-For pain that is mild or not expected to persist for an extended period of time
-For acute pain
-In the immediate postoperative period (the first 24 hours following surgery) for patients not
previously taking the drug, because its safety in this setting has not been established.
-For postoperative pain unless the patient is already receiving chronic opioid therapy prior to surgery, or if the postoperative pain is expected to be moderate to severe and persist for an extended period of time.

Oxycodone 60 and 80 mg tablets, a single dose greater than 40 mg, or a total daily dose greater than 80 mg are only for patients in whom tolerance to an opioid of comparable potency is established. Patients considered opioid tolerant are those who are taking at least 60 mg oral morphine daily, 25 mcg transdermal fentanyl per hour, 30 mg oral oxycodone daily, 8 mg oral hydromorphone daily, 25 mg oral oxymorphone daily, or an equianalgesic dose of another opioid for one week or longer.

Oxycodone tablets should be taken one tablet at a time with enough water to ensure complete swallowing immediately after placing in the mouth.

The controlled-release form of oxycodone should not be broken, chewed, or crushed as this could lead to a faster release and absorption of oxycodone, potentiating toxicity.

Avoid high fat meals at the start of treatment with 160 mg controlled-release tablets.

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