Skip to Content

Lodosyn

Generic Name: Levodopa/Carbidopa
Class: Dopamine Precursors
VA Class: CN500
CAS Number: 59-92-7
Brands: Lodosyn

Levodopa/Carbidopa is also contained as an ingredient in the following combinations:
Carbidopa and Levodopa

Medically reviewed on May 7, 2018

Introduction

Antiparkinsonian; levodopa is the levorotatory isomer of dihydroxyphenylalanine and the metabolic precursor of dopamine, and carbidopa is a decarboxylase inhibitor that inhibits the peripheral decarboxylation of levodopa to dopamine.104 105 106 107 108 d

Uses for Lodosyn

Parkinsonian Syndrome

Levodopa is used for symptomatic treatment of parkinsonian syndrome (e.g., parkinsonism, idiopathic Parkinson disease [paralysis agitans]); also used for postencephalitic parkinsonism and symptomatic parkinsonian syndrome resulting from carbon monoxide intoxication or manganese intoxication.104 105 106 107 108 117 d

Carbidopa is used in conjunction with levodopa to inhibit decarboxylation of peripheral levodopa and increase the amount of levodopa available for transport to the brain.107

Levodopa (in combination with carbidopa) is the most effective drug for relieving motor symptoms of parkinsonian syndrome and is considered the drug of choice for this use.d

Levodopa provides symptomatic relief (e.g., akinesia, rigidity, tremor) and improves functional ability;d however, effectiveness decreases over time and most patients develop motor fluctuations and dyskinesias (drug-induced involuntary movements) with long-term use.101 103 105 157 160

Strategies for reducing the risk of motor complications associated with long-term levodopa therapy include adjusting dosage of levodopa, adding adjunctive antiparkinsonian agents (e.g., dopamine agonist [e.g., pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine], selective monoamine oxidase [MAO]-B inhibitor [e.g., rasagiline, safinamide, selegiline], catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT] inhibitor [entacapone, tolcapone], amantadine), or initiating therapy with other antiparkinsonian agents first to delay use of levodopa.101 115 157 160 Delayed approach is often used in younger patients who have a higher risk of developing motor complications.101 116 157 160 Levodopa generally is used for initial therapy in patients >70 years of age, those with cognitive impairment, and those with severe disease.101

Drug-induced Extrapyramidal Effects

Not effective in the management of extrapyramidal effects induced by antipsychotic agents (e.g., phenothiazines).d

Lodosyn Dosage and Administration

Administration

Oral Administration

Administer orally as conventional tablets, extended-release tablets, orally disintegrating tablets, or extended-release capsules.104 105 107 117

Extended-release tablets: Administer as whole or half tablets; do not chew or crush.105

Extended-release capsules: Swallow whole without regard to food; do not chew, divide or crush.117 In patients with difficulty swallowing, may open capsules and sprinkle entire contents on a small amount (e.g., 1–2 tablespoons) of applesauce; administer mixture immediately and do not store for later use.117

Orally disintegrating capsules: Just prior to administration, gently remove tablet from the bottle with dry hands.104 Place tablet on tongue to dissolve (usually within seconds) and swallow with saliva.104 Administration with water is not necessary.104

Fixed combination levodopa, carbidopa, and entacapone tablets (Stalevo): Do not divide tablets; administer only one tablet per dosing interval.106

Dosage

Dosage expressed in terms of levodopa and carbidopa.104 105 106 107 108

Available in combination products containing a 1:4 or 1:10 ratio of carbidopa to levodopa.104 105 106 107 Additional carbidopa can be administered separately if a higher carbidopa dosage than is available in the combination preparations is needed.108 The treatment regimen can include levodopa-carbidopa extended-release tablets, extended-release capsules, conventional tablets, or orally disintegrating tablets and carbidopa tablets based on individual requirements.104 105 107 108 117 Levodopa no longer is commercially available in the US as a single-entity preparation.d

Also available as a fixed-combination preparation containing levodopa, carbidopa, and entacapone (Stalevo); available in a 1:4 ratio of carbidopa to levodopa.106 Used if optimum maintenance dosage of the 3 drugs corresponds to the dosage in the combination preparation.106 No experience transferring patients receiving levodopa-carbidopa extended-release tablets or levodopa-carbidopa preparations containing the 1:10 ratio.106

For some patients (maintenance levodopa dosage ≤600 mg daily, no dyskinesias), the fixed combination containing levodopa, carbidopa, and entacapone (Stalevo) can be used when initiating entacapone therapy if optimum maintenance dosage of levodopa-carbidopa corresponds to dosage in the combination preparation.106

Adjust levodopa-carbidopa dosage carefully according to individual requirements, response, and tolerance.104 105 106 107 108

Dosage adjustment may be needed when other antiparkinsonian drugs are added to or discontinued from the regimen.104 105 106 107 108

Daily dosage of carbidopa should be at least 70–100 mg daily; patients receiving <70–100 mg daily are likely to experience nausea and vomiting.104 105 107 108 d

Observe patient closely if dosage is reduced abruptly or the drug is discontinued; risk of precipitating a symptom complex resembling neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS).104 105 106 107 (See Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome under Cautions.)

If general anesthesia required, continue therapy as long as patient permitted to take oral medications.104 105 106 107 If therapy interrupted, observe for NMS; resume as soon as patient is able to take oral medications.104 105 106 107 (See Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome under Cautions.)

Adults

Parkinsonian Syndrome
Levodopa-Carbidopa Conventional Tablets or Orally Disintegrating Tablets
Oral

Initially, levodopa 100 mg/carbidopa 25 mg (as 1 tablet) 3 times daily.104 107 109

Increase dosage by levodopa 100 mg/carbidopa 25 mg (1 tablet) daily or every other day until a daily dosage of levodopa 800 mg/carbidopa 200 mg is reached or adverse effects prevent further increases or necessitate discontinuance.104 107 109 d

Alternatively, initiate with levodopa 100 mg/carbidopa 10 mg (as 1 tablet) 3 or 4 times daily; this dosage will not provide an adequate dose of carbidopa for most patients.104 107 109 Increase dosage by levodopa 100 mg/carbidopa 10 mg (1 tablet) daily or every other day until a daily dosage of levodopa 800 mg/carbidopa 80 mg is reached.104 107 109

Levodopa-Carbidopa Extended-release Tablets
Oral

Initially, levodopa 200 mg/carbidopa 50 mg (as 1 extended-release tablet) twice daily; initial dosage should not be given at intervals <6 hours.105 Adjust dosage based on response and tolerance at intervals ≥3 days.105 Most patients are treated adequately with levodopa 400 mg to 1.6 g daily and carbidopa 100–400 mg daily, administered in divided doses at intervals ranging from 4–8 hours while awake.105 Higher dosages (levodopa 2.4 g/carbidopa 600 mg) and shorter intervals (<4 hours) have been used but usually are not recommended.105 If the dosing interval is <4 hours and/or the divided doses are not equal, the smaller doses can be given at the end of the day.105

Dosage may be initiated, titrated, and stabilized initially with conventional (immediate-release) tablets.105 107

Transfer to extended-release tablets: initial dosage should provide 10% more levodopa daily than dosage previously received as conventional tablets; levodopa dosage may need to be increased up to 30% more daily, depending on response.105 (See Bioavailability under Pharmacokinetics.)

Levodopa-Carbidopa Extended-release Capsules
Oral

Extended-release capsules are not bioequivalent with immediate-release preparations (i.e., conventional tablets, orally disintegrating tablets).117 Dosages using the extended-release capsule formulation are not directly interchangeable with dosages of other levodopa-carbidopa preparations.117

Patients transferring from immediate-release preparations: Consult manufacturer's prescribing information for recommended dosage conversions.117 Following conversion, increase or decrease dose and/or dosing interval as necessary based on patient tolerance and clinical response.117

Treatment-naive patients: Initially, levodopa 95 mg/carbidopa 23.75 mg (as extended-release capsules) 3 times daily for the first 3 days.117 May increase to levodopa 145 mg/carbidopa 36.25 mg 3 times daily on the fourth day of treatment.117 Thereafter, may increase dosage based on patient tolerance and clinical response up to a maximum of levodopa 390 mg/carbidopa 97.5 mg 3 times daily; if needed, dosing frequency may be increased to a maximum of 5 times daily.117 Maintain patients on the lowest possible dosage necessary to achieve adequate symptom control while minimizing adverse effects.117

Carbidopa
Oral

Carbidopa: 25 mg with first dose of levodopa/carbidopa each day for patients who need additional carbidopa; additional 12.5- or 25-mg doses may given during the day with each dose of levodopa/carbidopa.108

Prescribing Limits

Adults

Parkinsonian Syndrome
Oral

Experience with carbidopa dosages >200 mg daily limited.104 105 107 108

Manufacturer recommends a maximum daily dose of levodopa 2.45 g and carbidopa 612.5 mg when using the extended-release capsules.117

If fixed-combination preparations containing levodopa 50–150 mg, carbidopa 12.5–37.5 mg, and entacapone 200 mg (Stalevo 50, 75, 100, 125, and 150) are used, maximum of 8 tablets daily.106

If fixed-combination preparation containing levodopa 200 mg, carbidopa 50 mg, and entacapone 200 mg (Stalevo 200) is used, maximum of 6 tablets daily.106

Cautions for Lodosyn

Contraindications

  • Concomitant use with a nonselective MAO inhibitor.104 105 106 107 (See Specific Drugs and Foods under Interactions.)

  • Angle-closure glaucoma.104 105 106 107 d

  • Known hypersensitivity to levodopa, carbidopa, or any ingredient in the formulation.104 105 106 107

Warnings/Precautions

Warnings

Motor Complications

Therapy associated with dyskinesias; dosage reduction may be needed.104 105 106 107 d

Motor fluctuations also may occur with long-term use.d May manifest as “end-of-dose” effect, sudden loss of effectiveness with abrupt onset of akinesia followed by sudden return of effectiveness (“on-off” phenomenon), or sudden hypotonic freezing (patient falls frequently while attempting to walk).d

Psychiatric Effects

Mental disturbances reported.104 105 106 107 d Observe patients for depression with concomitant suicidal tendencies.104 105 106 107 d

Hallucinations and abnormal thoughts or behavior (e.g., paranoia, confusion, psychotic disorder, agitation, delusions, delirium, psychotic-like behavior, disorientation, aggressive behavior) reported in some patients receiving dopaminergic drugs.107 Hallucinations generally present soon after initiation of levodopa therapy and may be alleviated by reducing dosage of the drug.107

Generally avoid use in patients with major psychotic disorders.107

Cardiovascular Effects

Risk of orthostatic hypotension; usually asymptomatic and tolerance usually develops within a few months.d

Cardiac ischemic events reported with use of some preparations.117

Use with caution in patients with a history of MI who have residual atrial, nodal, or ventricular arrhythmias; monitor cardiac function in a facility with intensive cardiac care immediately available during the initial dosage adjustment.104 105 106 107 d

Use with caution in patients with severe cardiovascular disease.104 105 106 107 d

Respiratory Effects

Use with caution in patients with severe pulmonary disease (e.g., bronchial asthma).104 105 106 107 d

GI Effects

Use with caution in patients with a history of peptic ulcers; possibility of upper GI hemorrhage in these patients.d 104 105 106 107

Sudden Sleep Episodes

Episodes of falling asleep while engaged in activities of daily living (e.g., driving) reported, sometimes resulting in accidents.105 107

Some patients perceived no warning signs (e.g., excessive drowsiness) and believed they were alert immediately prior to the event.105 107

Monitor patients for drowsiness or sleepiness.105 107 Patients may not acknowledge drowsiness or sleepiness until directly questioned about such adverse effects during specific activities.105 107 Ask patients about any factors that may increase the risk of somnolence (e.g., concomitant sedating drugs, presence of sleep disorders).105 107

Consider discontinuing therapy if a patient develops daytime sleepiness or episodes of falling asleep during activities that require active participation (e.g., conversations, eating).105 107 If the drug is continued, advise patients not to drive and to avoid other potentially dangerous activities.105 107

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)

Symptom complex resembling NMS reported following dosage reduction or abrupt withdrawal of levodopa.104 105 106 107 d

Observe closely when dosage is reduced or the drug discontinued; especially important in patients receiving concomitant therapy with an antipsychotic agent.d 104 105 106 107

General Precautions

Evaluate hepatic, hematopoietic, cardiovascular, and renal function periodically.d 104 105 106 107

Use of Fixed Combinations

When the fixed-combination preparation containing levodopa, carbidopa, and entacapone (Stalevo) is used, observe the usual precautions and contraindications associated with all drugs in the preparation.106

Glaucoma

Can be used with caution in patients with well-controlled open-angle glaucoma; monitor IOP.104 105 106 107 d (See Contraindications under Cautions.)

Endocrine Disorders

Use with caution.104 105 106 107

Closely monitor diabetic patients; levodopa may affect glycemic control.d

Melanoma

Epidemiologic studies indicate patients with parkinsonian syndrome have a twofold to approximately sixfold higher risk of developing melanoma than the general population.105 106 107 Unclear whether increased risk is due to parkinsonian syndrome or other factors (e.g., drugs used to treat the disease).105 106 107

Monitor for melanoma on a frequent and regular basis.105 106 107 Manufacturer recommends periodic skin examinations performed by appropriately qualified individuals (e.g., dermatologists).105 106 107

Intense Urges

Intense urges (e.g., urge to gamble, increased sexual urges, other intense urges) and inability to control these urges reported in some patients receiving antiparkinsonian agents that increase central dopaminergic tone (including levodopa-carbidopa).105 106 107 Although causal relationship not established, urges stopped in some cases when dosage was reduced or drug was discontinued.105 106 107

Consider reducing dosage or discontinuing levodopa-carbidopa if a patient develops such urges.105 106 107

Phenylketonuria

Levodopa-carbidopa orally disintegrating tablets contain aspartame (NutraSweet), which is metabolized in the GI tract to phenylalanine.104 110 111 112 113 114

Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Category C.104 105 106 107

Lactation

Levodopa is distributed into human milk; caution advised.104 105 106 107 Carbidopa is distributed into milk in rats;106 not known whether carbidopa is distributed into human milk.108

Pediatric Use

Safety and efficacy not established in children <18 years of age.104 105 106 107

Geriatric Use

No overall differences in safety or efficacy relative to younger adults.107

Hepatic Impairment

Use with caution.107

Renal Impairment

Use with caution.107

Common Adverse Effects

Dyskinesias (choreiform, dystonic, other adventitious movements), nausea.104 105 106 107

Interactions for Lodosyn

Specific Drugs and Foods

Drug or Food

Interaction

Comments

Anticholinergic agents

Potential for decreased tremor and/or exacerbation of abnormal involuntary movements104 105 106 107 d

Possible delay in levodopa absorption and increase in gastric metabolism of levodopad

Antidepressants, tricyclic

Potential for hypertension and dyskinesia104 105 106 107

Use concomitantly with cautiond

Antipsychotic agents (phenothiazines, butyrophenones, risperidone)

Possible reduction in the therapeutic effects of levodopa104 105 106 107

Possible increased risk of NMS104 105 106 107 (see Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome under Cautions)

Observe patient for loss of therapeutic effect104 105 106 107

Benzodiazepines

Possible reduction in the therapeutic effects of levodopa with chlordiazepoxide or diazepamd

Use concomitantly with cautiond

Dopamine-depleting agents (e.g., reserpine, tetrabenazine)

Concomitant use not recommended107

Hypotensive agents

Potential for symptomatic postural hypotension104 105 106 107

Potential for toxic CNS effects such as psychosis with methyldopad

Dosage adjustment of the hypotensive agent may be needed104 105 106 107

Iron preparations

Decreased bioavailability of levodopa and carbidopa104 105 106 107

Administer concomitantly with caution104 105

Isoniazid

Possible reduction in the therapeutic effects of levodopa104 105 106 107

Observe patient for loss of therapeutic effect104 105 106 107

MAO inhibitors

Potential for hypertension, headache, hyperexcitability with nonselective MAO inhibitorse

Possible severe orthostatic hypotension with selegiline104 105 106 107

Contraindicated with nonselective MAO inhibitors;104 105 106 107 discontinue nonselective MAO inhibitor at least 2 weeks prior to initiation of levodopa104 105 106 107

May be administered concomitantly with a selective MAO inhibitor (e.g., selegiline) with caution104 105 106 107

Metoclopramide

Possible increase in bioavailability of levodopa104 105 106 107

Possible reduction in the therapeutic effects of levodopa104 105 106 107

Papaverine

Possible reduction in the therapeutic effects of levodopa104 105 106 107

Observe patient for loss of therapeutic effect104 105 106 107

Phenytoin

Possible reduction in the therapeutic effects of levodopa104 105 106 107

Observe patient for loss of therapeutic effect104 105 106 107

Protein

High protein diet may impair absorption104 105 106 107

Lodosyn Pharmacokinetics

Absorption

Bioavailability

Well absorbed from the GI tract; peak plasma levodopa concentrations achieved within 0.5 or 2 hours following administration of conventional tablets or extended-release tablets, respectively.105

Bioavailability of levodopa from extended-release tablets 70–75% of that from conventional tablets.105

Extended-release tablets result in less fluctuation in plasma concentrations between doses than conventional tablets.105

Levodopa-carbidopa conventional tablets and orally disintegrating tablets begin to release the drugs within 30 minutes of administration.104 107 109 Pharmacokinetic values for orally disintegrating tablet are similar to those for the conventional tablet.109

Levodopa-carbidopa extended-release capsules contain both immediate-release and extended-release components.117 119 Following oral administration, plasma levodopa concentrations initially increase rapidly, followed by sustained plasma concentrations for about 4–5 hours; minimal peak to trough fluctuation.117 119 Bioavailability of levodopa from extended-release capsules approximately 70% relative to immediate-release preparations.117 Peak levodopa concentration is 30% of that achieved with immediate-release preparations at comparable doses.117

Food

Effects of food on levodopa pharmacokinetics are variable due to differences in formulations, dosages, and study designs.119

High protein diet may interfere with absorption of levodopa from conventional preparations.104 106 107 d

Extended-release tablets: Food increases bioavailability and peak plasma concentrations of levodopa.105

Extended-release capsules: Food decreased peak plasma concentration by 21% and increased AUC of levodopa by 13%; absorption delayed by approximately 2 hours.117 119

Distribution

Extent

Widely distributed.d

<1% of levodopa penetrates the CNS;d carbidopa does not cross the blood-brain barrier.104 105 106 107

Plasma Protein Binding

Levodopa: 10–30%.106

Carbidopa: About 36%.106 d

Elimination

Metabolism

Levodopa is metabolized in the stomach and intestine and on first pass through the liver; absorbed levodopa decarboxylated to dopamine.d

Carbidopa inhibits peripheral decarboxylation of levodopa, thus increasing availability of levodopa for distribution into the CNS.104 105 106 107

Elimination Route

Levodopa is excreted in urine as metabolites.d

Half-life

Levodopa: 1.5 hours when administered with carbidopa.104 105

Stability

Storage

Oral

Conventional Levodopa-Carbidopa Tablets

Tightly closed container at 25°C (may be exposed to 15–30°C).107 Protect from light and moisture.107

Extended-release Levodopa-Carbidopa Tablets

Tightly closed container at 25°C (may be exposed to 15–30°C); protect from light and moisture.105

Orally Disintegrating Levodopa-Carbidopa Tablets

Tightly closed container at 20–25°C; protect from light and moisture.104

Extended-release Levodopa-Carbidopa Capsules

Tightly closed container at 25°C (may be exposed to 15–30°C); protect from light and moisture.117

Actions

  • Manifestations of parkinsonian syndrome related to depletion of dopamine in the corpus striatum.104 105 106 107

  • Levodopa relieves symptoms of parkinsonism presumably by increasing dopamine concentrations in the brain.104 105 106 107

Advice to Patients

  • Importance of taking levodopa/carbidopa as directed.104 105 106 107 Importance of not altering the prescribed dosage regimen or adding other antiparkinsonian drugs.104 105 106 107

  • Importance of informing patients with phenylketonuria that the orally disintegrating tablets contain aspartame.104

  • Advise patient to notify clinician if abnormal involuntary movements appear or get worse; dosage adjustment may be needed.104 105 106 107

  • Advise patient of expected onset and duration of effect.104 105 106 107

  • Possibility that dark color (red, brown, black) may appear in saliva, urine, or sweat; garments may be discolored.104 105 106 107

  • Advise patient that a change in diet to food high in protein may delay absorption of levodopa and reduce systemic availability.104 105 106 107 Excess acidity may delay absorption.104 105 106 107

  • Importance of informing clinician of existing or contemplated concomitant therapy, including prescription and OTC drugs and dietary or herbal products.104 105 106 107

  • Risk of somnolence and episodes of sudden sleep onset; importance of exercising caution when driving or operating machinery and of refraining from such activities if somnolence and/or an episode of sudden sleep onset occurs.105 107

  • Importance of asking patients whether they have developed any new or increased gambling urges, sexual urges, or other urges while receiving levodopa-carbidopa and of advising them of the importance of reporting such urges.105 106 107

  • Importance of frequent monitoring for melanoma and periodic dermatologic examinations by a dermatologist.105 106 107

  • Importance of women informing clinician if they are or plan to become pregnant or plan to breast-feed.104 105 106 107

  • Importance of advising patients of other important precautionary information.104 105 106 107 (See Cautions.)

Preparations

Excipients in commercially available drug preparations may have clinically important effects in some individuals; consult specific product labeling for details.

Please refer to the ASHP Drug Shortages Resource Center for information on shortages of one or more of these preparations.

* available from one or more manufacturer, distributor, and/or repackager by generic (nonproprietary) name

Carbidopa

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Oral

Tablets

25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa)*

Carbidopa Tablets

Lodosyn (scored)

Valeant

* available from one or more manufacturer, distributor, and/or repackager by generic (nonproprietary) name

Carbidopa-Levodopa (Co-careldopa)

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Oral

Capsules, extended-release

Carbidopa 23.75 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 95 mg

Rytary

Impax

Carbidopa 36.25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 145 mg

Rytary

Impax

Carbidopa 48.75 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 195 mg

Rytary

Impax

Carbidopa 61.25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 245 mg

Rytary

Impax

Tablets

Carbidopa 10 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 100 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Tablets

Sinemet (scored)

Merck

Carbidopa 25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 100 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Tablets

Sinemet (scored)

Merck

Carbidopa 25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 250 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Tablets

Sinemet (scored)

Merck

Tablets, extended-release

Carbidopa 50 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 200 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Extended-release Tablets

Sinemet CR

Merck

Carbidopa 25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 100 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Extended-release Tablets

Sinemet CR

Merck

Tablets, orally disintegrating

Carbidopa 10 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 100 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Orally-disintegrating Tablets

Carbidopa 25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 100 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Orally-disintegrating Tablets

Carbidopa 25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) and Levodopa 250 mg*

Carbidopa and Levodopa Orally-disintegrating Tablets

Other Carbidopa Combinations

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Oral

Tablets, film-coated

Carbidopa 12.5 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) with Entacapone 200 mg and Levodopa 50 mg

Stalevo

Novartis

Carbidopa 18.75 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) Entacapone 200 mg and Levodopa 75 mg

Stalevo

Novartis

Carbidopa 25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) with Entacapone 200 mg and Levodopa 100 mg

Stalevo

Novartis

Carbidopa 31.25 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) Entacapone 200 mg and Levodopa 125 mg

Stalevo

Novartis

Carbidopa 37.5 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) with Entacapone 200 mg and Levodopa 150 mg

Stalevo

Novartis

Carbidopa 50 mg (of anhydrous carbidopa) Entacapone 200 mg and Levodopa 200 mg

Stalevo

Novartis

AHFS DI Essentials. © Copyright 2018, Selected Revisions May 7, 2018. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 4500 East-West Highway, Suite 900, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

† Use is not currently included in the labeling approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

References

Only references cited for selected revisions after 1984 are available electronically.

101. Olanow CW, Watts RL, Koller WC. An algorithm (decision tree) for the management of Parkinson’s disease (2001): treatment guidelines. Neurology. 2001; 56:S1-S88.

102. Chong BS, Mersfelder TL. Entacapone. Ann Pharmacother. 2000; 34:1056-65. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10981253?dopt=AbstractPlus

103. Anon. Initial treatment of Parkinson’s disease: wait just a minute. Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2001; 43:59-60. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11445778?dopt=AbstractPlus

104. Mylan Pharmaceuticals. Carbidopa and levodopa orally disintegrating tablets. Morgantown, WV; 2016 Sept.

105. Merck. Sinemet CR (carbidopa-levodopa) sustained-release tablets prescribing information. Whitehouse Station, NJ; 2014 Jul.

106. Novartis. Stalevo 50, Stalevo 75, Stalevo 100, Stalevo 125, Stalevo 150, Stalevo 200 (carbidopa, levodopa and entacapone) tablets prescribing information. East Hanover, NJ; 2009 Mar.

107. Merck. Sinemet (carbidopa-levodopa) tablets prescribing information. Whitehouse Station, NJ; 2014 Juln.

108. Valeant. Lodosyn (carbidopa) tablets prescribing information. Bridgewater, NJ; 2017 Feb.

109. Anon. Parcopa: a rapidly dissolving formulation of carbidopa/levodopa. Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005; 47:12.

110. American Medical Association Council on Scientific Affairs. Aspartame: review of safety issues. JAMA. 1985; 254:400 2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2861297?dopt=AbstractPlus

111. Gossel TA. A review of aspartame: characteristics, safety and uses. US Pharm. 1984; 9:26,28 30.

112. Food and Drug Administration. Aspartame as an inactive ingredient in human drug products; labeling requirements. Proposed rule. [21 CFR Part 201] Fed Regist. 1983; 48:54993 5. (lDIS 178728)

113. Food and Drug Administration. Food additives permitted for direct addition to food for human consumption; aspartame. Final rule. [21 CFR Part 172] Fed Regist. 1983; 48:31376 82. (IDIS 172957)

114. Anon. Aspartame and other sweeteners. Med Lett Drugs Ther. 1982; 24:1 2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7054648?dopt=AbstractPlus

115. Lewitt PA. Levodopa for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. N Engl J Med. 2008; 359:2468-76. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19052127?dopt=AbstractPlus

116. PD Med Collaborative Group, Gray R, Ives N et al. Long-term effectiveness of dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase B inhibitors compared with levodopa as initial treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD MED): a large, open-label, pragmatic randomised trial. Lancet. 2014; 384:1196-205. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24928805?dopt=AbstractPlus

117. Impax. Rytary (carbidopa-levodopa) extended-release capsules prescribing information. Hayward, CA; 2016 Oct.

119. Mittur A, Gupta S, Modi NB. Pharmacokinetics of Rytary, An Extended-Release Capsule Formulation of Carbidopa-Levodopa. Clin Pharmacokinet. 2017; 56:999-1014. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28236251?dopt=AbstractPlus

157. . Drugs for Parkinson's disease. Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017; 59:187-194. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29136401?dopt=AbstractPlus

160. Pahwa R, Factor SA, Lyons KE et al. Practice Parameter: treatment of Parkinson disease with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology. 2006; 66:983-95. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16606909?dopt=AbstractPlus

d. AHFS Drug Information. McEvoy GK, ed. Levodopa/carbidopa. Bethesda, MD: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

e. AHFS Drug Information. McEvoy GK, ed. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors General Statement. Bethesda, MD: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Hide