Skip to main content

Hepatitis A Virus Vaccine Inactivated

Class: Vaccines
ATC Class: J07BC02
VA Class: IM100
Brands: Havrix, Vaqta

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Dec 22, 2021. Written by ASHP.

Introduction

Inactivated virus vaccine. Hepatitis A virus vaccine inactivated contains cell culture-adapted, attenuated hepatitis A virus (HAV) and is used to stimulate active immunity to HAV infection. Commercially available in the US as monovalent vaccines (HepA; Havrix, Vaqta) and in a fixed-combination vaccine with hepatitis B vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix).

Uses for Hepatitis A Virus Vaccine Inactivated

Prevention of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Infection

Prevention of HAV infection in adults, adolescents, and children ≥1 year of age.

Although HAV infection may be asymptomatic or relatively mild in many patients, it can result in substantial morbidity and associated health-care costs and work loss (11–22% of patients require hospitalization) and may be associated with fulminant hepatitis and hepatic failure. Overall HAV case-fatality rate in the US is 0.3–0.6%, but increases to about 2% in those ≥40 years of age. HAV is highly contagious (especially during the 2 weeks before onset of symptoms). The virus is transmitted person-to-person, principally through the fecal-oral route. HAV infection remains one of the most commonly reported vaccine-preventable diseases in travelers.

USPHS Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), AAP, and American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recommend that all children be vaccinated against HAV infection at 1 year of age (i.e., 12 through 23 months of age), unless contraindicated. (See Contraindications under Cautions.)

ACIP, AAP, AAFP, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and American College of Physicians (ACP) also recommend vaccination against HAV for all previously unvaccinated children, adolescents, and adults at high risk of exposure to HAV (see Preexposure Vaccination Against HAV Infection in High-risk Groups under Uses) and for any other unvaccinated individual desiring protection from HAV infection.

For internationally adopted children whose immune status is uncertain, vaccinations can be repeated or serologic tests performed to confirm immunity. For HepA vaccine, ACIP states that the simplest approach is to revaccinate according to the US recommended immunization schedule if child is ≥12 months of age. (See Dosage and Administration.) Alternatively, test for serologic evidence of susceptibility to HAV. (See Pre-and Postvaccination Serologic Testing under Cautions.) When a child is being adopted from a country with high or intermediate HAV endemicity, ACIP states that all previously unvaccinated individuals who anticipate close personal contact with the adoptee during the child’s initial 60 days in the US (e.g., household members, regular babysitters) should receive routine vaccination with HepA vaccine, with the first dose given as soon as adoption is planned (ideally ≥2 weeks before the child’s arrival). CDC website ([Web]) has information regarding which countries have high or intermediate levels of HAV endemicity.

HepA vaccine will not prevent hepatitis caused by other infectious agents (e.g., hepatitis B virus [HBV], hepatitis C virus [HCV], hepatitis E virus [HEV]).

When vaccination against both HAV and HBV infection is indicated in adults ≥18 years of age, the commercially available fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) can be used. ACIP, AAP, and AAFP state that use of a combination vaccine generally is preferred over separate injections of the equivalent component vaccines; considerations should include provider assessment (e.g., number of injections, vaccine availability, likelihood of improved coverage, likelihood of patient return, storage and cost considerations), patient preference, and potential for adverse effects. However, the HepA-HepB (Twinrix) fixed-combination vaccine should not be used for HAV postexposure prophylaxis. (See Use of Fixed Combinations under Cautions.)

Preexposure Vaccination Against HAV Infection in High-risk Groups

Preexposure vaccination in previously unvaccinated children, adolescents, or adults who are or will be at high risk of exposure to HAV or are at high risk of developing fulminant hepatitis and hepatic failure if they become infected with HAV.

ACIP, AAP, AAFP, and others recommend preexposure vaccination in previously unvaccinated children ≥12 months of age who reside in states, counties, or communities where the rate of HAV infection is high and in unvaccinated travelers, unvaccinated household or sexual contacts of an individual with confirmed HAV infection, and unvaccinated individuals at risk because of their occupation or high-risk behavior.

If HepA vaccine cannot be used because it is contraindicated or unavailable and short-term protection against HAV is needed, preexposure passive immunization with IGIM is recommended.

In states, counties, or communities where the rate of HAV infection is high, ACIP recommends that existing selective preexposure HepA vaccination programs for children 2 through 18 years of age be maintained. In such areas, new efforts focused on routine vaccination of all children at 1 year of age should enhance, not replace, ongoing programs directed at a broader population of children. In areas without existing selective vaccination programs, catch-up vaccination of unvaccinated children 2 through 18 years of age may be considered. Such catch-up vaccination programs may be especially warranted because of rising incidence or ongoing outbreaks of HAV among children or adolescents.

HIV-infected individuals, especially those with chronic liver disease (including those coinfected with HBV or HCV), should be vaccinated against HAV. ACIP, AAP, CDC, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and others recommend that HAV-susceptible, HIV-infected adults, adolescents, and children receive HepA vaccine. Consider that the vaccine may be less immunogenic in immunocompromised individuals. (See Individuals with Altered Immunocompetence under Cautions.)

Travelers to areas with intermediate to high levels of endemic HAV are at risk of exposure to the disease, and ACIP, CDC, WHO, and others recommend preexposure vaccination against HAV for such individuals. CDC states vaccination against HAV can be considered in individuals traveling to any destination. CDC website ([Web]) has information regarding which countries have high or intermediate levels of HAV endemicity. Risk of acquiring HAV while traveling varies with living conditions, length of stay, and incidence of HAV infection in the area visited. Consider that many cases of HAV occur in travelers to developing countries with standard tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors. Ideally, the first dose of HepA vaccine should be administered as soon as travel to countries with high or intermediate HAV endemicity is considered. (See Preexposure Vaccination Against HAV Infection in High-risk Groups under Pediatric Patients and also Adults, in Dosage and Administration.) Alternatively, if the vaccine is contraindicated or cannot be used, passive immunization with a single dose of IGIM may provide protection for up to 3 months. For optimal protection in travelers at greatest risk for HAV (older adults or individuals with altered immunocompetence, chronic liver disease, or other chronic medical condition) who plan to depart in <2 weeks, a dose of IGIM should be given concomitantly with the initial dose of HepA vaccine (at a different site). ACIP states that the fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) should not be used for preexposure vaccination in travelers who will depart within 2 weeks. (See Use of Fixed Combinations under Cautions.)

Household and sexual contacts of individuals with confirmed HAV infection are at increased risk of exposure to HAV. Sexually active male adolescents and adults who have sex with men (homosexual, bisexual) should be vaccinated against HAV. Primary-care clinicians and those in specialty medical settings should offer the vaccine to such individuals; strategies to increase coverage (e.g., use of standing orders) should be considered.

Individuals who illicitly use injectable or noninjectable drugs may be at increased risk of exposure to HAV infection and should be vaccinated against HAV. Clinicians should obtain a complete history to identify individuals who might benefit from HepA vaccination (e.g., those who use illicit drugs or who are at increased risk for such drug use). Clinicians should consider implementing strategies to increase vaccine coverage in these patients (e.g., use of standing orders).

Individuals with hemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders who are HAV-seronegative should be vaccinated against HAV. Improved donor screening, more effective viral-inactivation procedures, and/or purification or filtration procedures have reduced, but not completely eliminated, the risk of pathogen transmission from plasma-derived clotting factors. Therefore, recipients of blood products (e.g., whole blood, packed RBCs, plasma) and plasma-derived preparations (e.g., albumin human, antihemophilic factor [human], anti-inhibitor coagulant complex, factor IX [human], factor IX complex) may be at increased risk of HAV infection.

Workers handling HAV-infected nonhuman primates and workers in contact with live HAV in a research laboratory setting should be vaccinated against HAV. Routine vaccination against HAV is not currently recommended for other occupational groups in the US.

Individuals with chronic liver disease and those who are awaiting or have undergone liver transplantation should be vaccinated against HAV. Although individuals with chronic liver disease are not at increased risk of acquiring HAV infection, such individuals are at increased risk of severe consequences of HAV infection, including fatal fulminant hepatitis and hepatic failure.

Some clinicians recommend that individuals with HBV or HCV infection, autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis be vaccinated against HAV. ACIP states that current data do not support routine vaccination of individuals who have chronic HBV or HCV infection but do not have evidence of chronic liver disease.

Food handlers and restaurant employees may be vaccinated against HAV. Vaccination may be considered in restaurant employees in areas where state and local health authorities or private employers have determined that such vaccination is indicated to decrease the frequency of HAV evaluations of food handlers and decrease the need for HAV postexposure prophylaxis in restaurant patrons. Under these circumstances, a record of HepA vaccination should be provided to vaccinated food handlers, those not vaccinated should be informed of the signs and symptoms of HAV infection, and all food handlers should be instructed on food preparation practices that reduce risk of fecal contamination. Routine use of HepA vaccine in all food handlers is not economically feasible from a societal or food industry perspective. Occasionally, vaccination of food handlers may be considered during a community outbreak.

Incarcerated adolescents in correctional facilities located in states with existing HepA vaccination programs for adolescents should receive HepA vaccine. Because of the likelihood that adolescents in juvenile correctional systems have indications for the vaccine, other correctional facilities also should consider routine HepA vaccination of all adolescents under their care. Test those with signs or symptoms of hepatitis for acute HAV, HBV, and HCV infection. Report those with HAV to the local health department and give appropriate postexposure prophylaxis with HepA vaccine to susceptible exposed residents.

If a community-wide outbreak of HAV occurs, accelerated HepA vaccination programs should be considered. A decision to initiate an outbreak-control vaccination program should take into account the feasibility of rapidly vaccinating the target population of children, adolescents, or young adults, and the costs associated with such a program. Routine vaccination of children in affected communities should continue in order to maintain high levels of immunity and prevent future epidemics.

HAV outbreaks in child-care centers have decreased considerably since the implementation of routine childhood immunization against HAV and further decreases are expected. ACIP does not recommend routine preexposure vaccination with HepA vaccine for personnel in child-care centers. However, HAV postexposure prophylaxis may be indicated if HAV is reported in attendees or staff. (See Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection under Uses.)

ACIP does not recommend routine preexposure vaccination with HepA vaccine in hospitals or schools and institutions for the developmentally disabled because the frequency of outbreaks in these institutions is not high enough to warrant such recommendations. Outbreaks involving student-to-student transmission in primary and secondary schools are rare in developed countries, but outbreaks have been documented; in developing countries, outbreaks among children in primary schools are more common. If an epidemiologic investigation indicates HAV transmission has occurred among students in a school or among patients or between patients and staff in a hospital, HAV postexposure prophylaxis should be administered to individuals who have close contact with index patients. (See Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection under Uses.)

ACIP and Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) state that routine preexposure vaccination with HepA vaccine or routine use of HAV postexposure prophylaxis in health-care personnel providing care to patients with HAV infection is not indicated. Instead, hygienic practices should be emphasized and health-care personnel should be made aware of the risk of exposure to HAV and precautions regarding direct contact with potentially infective materials. In documented outbreaks of HAV infection, HAV postexposure prophylaxis may be indicated in health-care workers and others who have close contact with the infected individuals. (See Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection under Uses.) The usefulness of HepA vaccine in controlling outbreaks in health-care settings has not been investigated.

Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection

Postexposure prophylaxis of HAV in susceptible individuals with recent (within 2 weeks) exposure to HAV.

The choice of active immunization with HepA vaccine and/or passive immunization with IGIM for postexposure prophylaxis should take into account the magnitude of risk associated with the exposure and characteristics of the patient that may be associated with more severe manifestations of HAV (e.g., older age, chronic liver disease).

Although IGIM was traditionally the recommended regimen for HAV postexposure prophylaxis since it is 80–90% effective if administered within 2 weeks of exposure, there is some evidence that monovalent HepA vaccine administered within 2 weeks of exposure may be as effective as IGIM in healthy individuals 1–40 years of age. The vaccine also offers certain advantages over IGIM (e.g., induces active immunity and longer protection, more readily available, easier to administer, greater patient acceptance).

For HAV postexposure prophylaxis in healthy individuals 12 months to 40 years of age, ACIP prefers use of monovalent HepA vaccine. In adults >40 years of age, ACIP prefers use of IGIM since data not available to date regarding efficacy of the vaccine for postexposure prophylaxis in this age group and these individuals are at risk of more severe manifestations of HAV; the vaccine can be used if IGIM cannot be obtained. IGIM should be used for HAV postexposure prophylaxis in children <12 months of age, immunocompromised individuals, individuals with chronic liver disease, and whenever the vaccine is contraindicated.

In those individuals in whom IGIM is preferred for HAV postexposure prophylaxis, a dose of HepA vaccine should be given simultaneously (using different syringes and different injection sites) if the vaccine is indicated for other reasons (e.g., catch-up vaccination, preexposure vaccination in high-risk groups) and is not contraindicated. If a dose of HepA vaccine is used with or without IGIM for HAV postexposure prophylaxis, a second (booster) dose of the vaccine should be administered according to the usually recommended schedule to ensure long-term protection. (See Dosage under Dosage and Administration.)

Monovalent HepA vaccine (Havrix, Vaqta) should be used when active immunization is indicated for HAV postexposure prophylaxis. Data not available to date regarding efficacy of the fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) for postexposure prophylaxis. (See Use of Fixed Combinations under Cautions.)

If HAV postexposure prophylaxis is indicated, administer as soon as possible (within 2 weeks of exposure). Data not available regarding efficacy of HAV postexposure prophylaxis administered >2 weeks after exposure.

HAV postexposure prophylaxis is indicated in all previously unvaccinated individuals who have had household or sexual contact (within the last 2 weeks) with an individual with serologically confirmed HAV. Also consider HAV postexposure prophylaxis for individuals exposed (within the last 2 weeks) through other types of ongoing, close personal contact (e.g., regular babysitting).

Contacts who have shared illicit drugs (within the last 2 weeks) with an individual with serologically confirmed HAV should receive HAV postexposure prophylaxis.

Administer HAV postexposure prophylaxis to all previously unvaccinated staff and attendees of child-care centers or homes if ≥1 case of HAV is recognized in children or employees or if HAV is recognized in ≥2 households of center attendees (within the last 2 weeks). In centers that do not provide care to children who wear diapers, HAV postexposure prophylaxis is indicated only in classroom contacts of the index patient. If an outbreak occurs (i.e., HAV in ≥3 families), HAV postexposure prophylaxis should also be considered for members of households that have diapered children attending the center.

If HAV is diagnosed in a food handler, ACIP recommends HAV postexposure prophylaxis (within 2 weeks) for other food handlers at the same establishment. Because common-source transmission to patrons is unlikely, HAV postexposure prophylaxis is not usually indicated for restaurant patrons, but may be considered if the food handler directly handled uncooked or cooked food and had diarrhea or poor hygienic practices and if patrons can be identified and treated within 2 weeks of exposure. Settings where repeated HAV exposure might have occurred (e.g., institutional cafeterias) warrant stronger consideration of postexposure prophylaxis for patrons.

When an individual with HAV is admitted to a hospital, health-care personnel do not need to receive routine HAV postexposure prophylaxis; careful hygienic practices should be emphasized in such situations.

If an epidemiologic investigation indicates that HAV transmission has occurred among students in a school or among hospital patients and/or hospital staff, ACIP recommends HAV postexposure prophylaxis in individuals who have close contact with index patients.

Routine HAV postexposure prophylaxis is not indicated when a single HAV case occurs in an elementary or secondary school or an office or other work setting and the source case is outside the school or work setting.

HAV postexposure prophylaxis is not usually indicated after a common-source HAV outbreak if cases have begun to occur because the 2-week period when such prophylaxis is known to be effective will have been exceeded.

Hepatitis A Virus Vaccine Inactivated Dosage and Administration

Administration

IM Injection

Administer monovalent HepA vaccine (Havrix, Vaqta) by IM injection.

Administer fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) by IM injection.

Do not administer IV, intradermally, or sub-Q.

Shake vaccine well immediately prior to administration to provide a uniform, slightly turbid, white, suspension. Discard vaccine if there are cracks in the vial or syringe or if it contains particulates, appears discolored, or cannot be resuspended with thorough agitation.

Do not dilute. Do not mix with any other vaccine or solution.

To ensure delivery into muscle, IM injections should be made at a 90° angle to the skin using a needle length appropriate for the individual’s age and body mass, thickness of adipose tissue and muscle at the injection site, and injection technique. Consider anatomic variability, especially in the deltoid; use clinical judgment to avoid inadvertent underpenetration or overpenetration of muscle.

For adults, administer IM into the deltoid muscle. For children 1–2 years of age, IM injections should preferably be administered into the anterolateral thigh; deltoid muscle is an alternative if muscle mass is adequate. For children and adolescents 3–18 years of age, deltoid muscle is preferred, although anterolateral thigh is an alternative.

Generally do not administer vaccines into buttock muscle in children because of potential for injection-associated injury to sciatic nerve. In addition, studies in adults indicate suboptimal immunologic response may occur if HepA vaccine is injected into gluteal muscle.

Although some experts state that aspiration (i.e., pulling back on the syringe plunger after needle insertion and before injection) can be performed to ensure that a blood vessel has not been entered, ACIP and AAP state this procedure is not required because large blood vessels are not present at recommended IM injection sites.

Since syncope may occur following vaccination, observe vaccinees for approximately 15 minutes after the dose. Syncope occurs most frequently in adolescents and young adults. If syncope occurs, observe patient until symptoms resolve.

May be given simultaneously with IGIM (using different syringes and different injection sites) when passive immunization is considered necessary in addition to active immunization with the vaccine (e.g., in travelers who will depart within 2 weeks). (See Interactions.)

May be given simultaneously with other age-appropriate vaccines during the same health-care visit (using different syringes and different injection sites). (See Interactions.)

When multiple vaccines are administered during a single health-care visit, each vaccine should be given with a different syringe and at different injection sites. Separate injection sites by at least 1 inch (if anatomically feasible) to allow appropriate attribution of any local adverse effects that may occur. If multiple vaccines must be given into a single limb, the deltoid may be used in older children and adults, but the thigh is preferred in younger children.

Dosage

Dose and dosing schedule vary according to the individual’s age and specific vaccine administered. Follow dosage recommendations for the specific preparation used.

Whenever possible, the HepA monovalent vaccine used for the initial dose should be used for subsequent doses in the same individual. However, ACIP and AAP state that the currently available monovalent formulations may be considered interchangeable.

For both monovalent vaccines, the minimum interval between the first and second dose is 6 months. Dosage for the second (booster) dose should be based on the individual’s age at the time the second dose is given. Although only limited data are available regarding the immune response to delayed administration of the second dose, some experts state it is not necessary to repeat the first dose if the interval between the first and second dose extends beyond 18 months.

When vaccination against both HAV and HBV infection is indicated in adults ≥18 years of age, the commercially available fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) can be used.

Pediatric Patients

Prevention of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Infection
Children and Adolescents 12 Months through 18 Years of Age (Havrix)
IM

Primary immunization consists of 2 doses given 6–12 months apart.

Give initial dose of 720 units. Give second (booster) dose of 720 units at 6–12 months after initial dose.

ACIP, AAP, and AAFP recommend that the initial dose be given routinely to all children at 1 year of age (i.e., 12 through 23 months of age) and that the second dose be given at least 6 months after the initial dose.

Children not fully vaccinated by 2 years of age can be vaccinated at subsequent health-care visits. ACIP recommends that catch-up vaccination be considered for children 2 through 18 years of age in areas without existing selective preexposure HepA vaccination programs.

If a different HepA vaccine (e.g., Vaqta) was used for the initial dose, a booster dose of Havrix may be given 6–18 months after the initial dose of the other vaccine. However, whenever possible, the formulation chosen for the initial dose should be used for the booster dose in the same individual.

Duration of immunity and need for subsequent doses after the initial dose and additional (booster) dose not fully determined. (See Duration of Immunity under Cautions.) Subsequent booster doses not recommended.

Children and Adolescents 12 Months through 18 Years of Age (Vaqta)
IM

Primary immunization consists of 2 doses given 6–18 months apart. Use pediatric/adolescent formulation containing 25 units/0.5 mL.

Give initial dose of 25 units. Give second (booster) dose of 25 units 6–18 months after initial dose.

ACIP, AAP, and AAFP recommend that the initial dose be given routinely to all children at 1 year of age (i.e., 12 through 23 months of age) and that the second dose be given at least 6 months after the initial dose.

Children not fully vaccinated by 2 years of age can be vaccinated at subsequent health-care visits. ACIP recommends that catch-up vaccination be considered for children 2 through 18 years of age in areas without existing selective preexposure HepA vaccination programs.

If a different HepA vaccine (e.g., Havrix) was used for the initial dose, a booster dose of Vaqta may be given 6–12 months after the initial dose of the other vaccine. However, whenever possible, the formulation chosen for the initial dose should be used for the booster dose in the same individual.

Duration of protection and need for subsequent doses after the initial dose and second (booster) dose not fully determined. (See Duration of Immunity under Cautions.) Subsequent booster doses not recommended.

Preexposure Vaccination Against HAV Infection in High-risk Groups
Children and Adolescents 12 Months through 18 Years of Age (Havrix or Vaqta)
IM

Primary immunization with the usually recommended age-appropriate initial and second (booster) doses before an expected exposure to HAV ensures the highest level of protection. (See Prevention of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Infection under Dosage and Administration.) Those who have received at least 1 dose given 1 month prior to an exposure probably will be protected.

For individuals who plan to travel or work in areas with intermediate to high levels of endemic HAV (see Preexposure Vaccination Against HAV Infection in High-risk Groups under Uses), give first vaccine dose as soon as travel is considered. For most healthy children, a single dose will provide adequate protection regardless of the scheduled departure date. To ensure protection in immunocompromised individuals or those with chronic liver disease or other chronic medical conditions who plan to depart within 2 weeks, give initial vaccine dose and simultaneously (using a different syringe and different injection site) give a single dose of IGIM (0.02 mL/kg).

Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection†
Children and Adolescents 12 Months through 18 Years of Age (Havrix or Vaqta)
IM

Give an age-appropriate dose of vaccine alone or in conjunction with a dose of IGIM (0.02 mL/kg) as soon as possible. Efficacy of HAV postexposure prophylaxis not established if given >2 weeks after exposure. (See Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection under Uses.)

In previously unvaccinated individuals, give primary immunization with the usually recommended age-appropriate initial and second (booster) doses of the vaccine. (See Prevention of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Infection under Dosage and Administration.) The first vaccine dose can be administered simultaneously with IGIM (using different syringes and different injection sites).

Individuals who have received at least 1 vaccine dose at least 1 month prior to the current HAV exposure do not need to receive postexposure prophylaxis with IGIM.

Adults

Prevention of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Infection
Adults ≥19 Years of Age (Havrix)
IM

Primary immunization consists of 2 doses given 6–12 months apart.

Give initial dose of 1440 units. Give second (booster) dose of 1440 units 6–12 months after initial dose.

If a different HepA vaccine (e.g., Vaqta) was used for the initial dose, a booster dose of Havrix may be given 6–12 months after the initial dose of the other vaccine. However, whenever possible, the formulation chosen for the initial dose should be used for the booster dose in the same individual.

Duration of protection and need for subsequent doses after the initial dose and second (booster) dose not fully determined. (See Duration of Immunity under Cautions.) Subsequent booster doses not recommended.

Adults ≥19 Years of Age (Vaqta)
IM

Primary immunization consists of 2 doses given 6–18 months apart. Use adult formulation containing 50 units per mL.

Give initial dose of 50 units. Give second (booster) dose of 50 units 6–18 months after initial dose.

If a different HepA vaccine (e.g., Havrix) was used for the initial dose, a booster dose of Vaqta may be given 6–12 months after the initial dose of the other vaccine. However, whenever possible, the formulation chosen for the initial dose should be used for subsequent doses in the same individual.

Duration of protection and need for subsequent doses after the initial primary dose and second (booster) dose not fully determined. (See Duration of Immunity under Cautions.) Subsequent booster doses not recommended.

Adults ≥18 Years of Age (HepA-HepB; Twinrix)
IM

Primary immunization consists of a series of 3 doses. Each 1-mL dose contains at least 720 units of HAV antigen and 20 mcg of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg).

For primary immunization in most patients, give initial dose on a selected date and give second and third doses at 1 and 6 months, respectively, after initial dose.

Alternatively, if an accelerated dosing schedule is needed, give initial dose on a selected date and give second and third doses at 7 and 21–30 days, respectively, after initial dose; also give a fourth (booster) dose at 12 months after initial dose.

Duration of immunity and need for subsequent doses after the recommended vaccine series not fully determined. (See Duration of Immunity under Cautions.) Booster dose is indicated if an accelerated dosing schedule is used, but booster doses not recommended following the usually recommended 3-dose regimen.

Preexposure Vaccination Against HAV Infection in High-risk Groups
Adults≥19 Years of Age (Havrix or Vaqta)
IM

Primary immunization with the usually recommended initial and second (booster) doses before an expected exposure to HAV ensures the highest level of protection. (See Prevention of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Infection under Dosage and Administration.) Those who have received at least 1 dose given 1 month prior to an exposure probably will be protected.

For individuals who plan to travel or work in areas with intermediate to high levels of endemic HAV (see Preexposure Vaccination Against HAV Infection in High-risk Groups under Uses), give first vaccine dose as soon as travel is considered. For most healthy adults ≤40 years of age, a single vaccine dose will provide adequate protection regardless of the scheduled departure date. To ensure protection in adults >40 years of age, immunocompromised individuals, or those with chronic liver disease or other chronic medical conditions who plan to depart within 2 weeks, give initial vaccine dose and simultaneously (using a different syringe and different injection site) give a single dose of IGIM (0.02 mL/kg).

Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection†
Adults ≥19 Years of Age (Havrix or Vaqta)
IM

Adults ≤40 years of age: Give an age-appropriate dose of vaccine alone or in conjunction with IGIM (0.02 mL/kg) as soon as possible. Efficacy of HAV postexposure prophylaxis not established if given >2 weeks after exposure. (See Postexposure Prophylaxis of HAV Infection under Uses.)

Adults >40 years of age: An age-appropriate dose of vaccine can be given, but individuals in this age group should receive IGIM for postexposure prophylaxis.

In previously unvaccinated individuals, give primary immunization with the usually recommended age-appropriate initial and second (booster) doses of the vaccine. (See Prevention of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Infection under Dosage and Administration.) The first vaccine dose can be administered simultaneously with IGIM (using different syringes and different injection sites).

Individuals who have received at least 1 vaccine dose at least 1 month prior to the current HAV exposure do not need to receive postexposure prophylaxis with IGIM.

Special Populations

Hepatic Impairment

No specific dosage recommendations.

Renal Impairment

No specific dosage recommendations.

Geriatric Patients

No specific dosage recommendations.

Cautions for Hepatitis A Virus Vaccine Inactivated

Contraindications

    Monovalent HepA Vaccine (Havrix, Vaqta)
  • Previous severe or allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) to any HepA vaccine.

  • Hypersensitivity to any ingredient in the formulation, including neomycin.

    Fixed-combination Vaccine Containing HepA Vaccine and HepB Vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix)
  • Hypersensitivity to any ingredient in the formulation, including the HepA vaccine component (Havrix), the HepB vaccine component (Engerix-B), yeast, or neomycin.

  • Previous hypersensitivity reaction to Twinrix or monovalent HepA or HepB vaccines.

Warnings/Precautions

Sensitivity Reactions

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Although risk of sensitivity reactions appears to be low, anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid manifestations have been reported rarely. Bronchoconstriction, asthma, wheezing, and serum sickness-like syndrome also reported rarely.

Take all known precautions to prevent adverse reactions, including a review of the patient’s history with respect to possible hypersensitivity to the vaccine or similar vaccines.

Epinephrine and other appropriate agents should be readily available in case anaphylaxis or an anaphylactoid reaction occurs. If a hypersensitivity reaction occurs, immediately institute appropriate therapy as indicated.

Do not administer additional vaccine doses to individuals who had a hypersensitivity reaction to a previous dose.

Neomycin Allergy

Havrix and Twinrix contains trace amounts of neomycin sulfate. Manufacturers state these vaccines contraindicated in individuals hypersensitive to neomycin.

Neomycin allergy usually results in delayed-type (cell-mediated) hypersensitivity reactions manifested as contact dermatitis. ACIP and AAP state that vaccines containing trace amounts of neomycin should not be used in individuals with a history of anaphylactic reaction to neomycin, but use of such vaccines may be considered in those with a history of delayed-type neomycin hypersensitivity if benefits of vaccination outweigh risks.

Latex Sensitivity

Some packaging components (e.g., needle cover, syringe plunger) of the single-dose prefilled syringes of Havrix and some packaging components (e.g., vial stopper, syringe plunger) of Vaqta contain dry natural latex.

Some individuals may be hypersensitive to natural latex proteins. Take appropriate precautions if these preparations are administered to individuals with a history of latex sensitivity.

General Precautions

Limitations of Vaccine Effectiveness

May not protect all vaccine recipients against HAV infection.

Individuals who have received at least 1 dose of vaccine given 1 month prior to HAV exposure probably will be protected. Use of both an initial and second (booster) dose given ≥6 months later ensures the highest level of protection.

Consider possibility that unrecognized HAV infection may be present in some individuals at the time of vaccination (infection has an incubation period of 15–50 days) and that the vaccine may not prevent infection in such individuals.

May not prevent infection in individuals who do not achieve protective antibody titers; the minimum titer needed to confer HAV immunity has not been established. (See Actions.)

Monovalent HepA vaccine (Havrix or Vaqta) provides protection only against HAV. Fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA virus vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) provides protection only against HAV and HBV. These vaccines do not provide protection against other infectious agents (e.g., HCV, HEV).

Travelers to areas with intermediate to high levels of endemic HAV who are >40 years of age, immunocompromised, or have chronic liver disease or other chronic medical conditions who receive preexposure vaccination with a dose of monovalent HepA vaccine given within 2 weeks of departure should also receive passive immunization with a dose of IGIM to ensure optimal protection.

ACIP states that the fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) should not be used for preexposure vaccination in travelers who will depart within 2 weeks and should not be used for postexposure prophylaxis against HAV. (See Use of Fixed Combinations under Cautions.)

Duration of Immunity

Duration of protection and need for subsequent doses after the initial dose and second (booster) dose of HepA vaccine not fully determined.

HepA vaccine has only been available in the US since 1995–1996. Data to date indicate that vaccine-induced antibodies are detectable for at least 5–12 years, but decline over time. It has been estimated that protective levels of anti-HAV may persist for ≥20–25 years after vaccination. Additional study is necessary before recommendations can be made regarding the need, if any, for additional booster doses of the vaccine.

Individuals with Altered Immunocompetence

May be administered to individuals immunosuppressed as the result of disease or immunosuppressive therapy. Consider possibility that the immune response to the vaccine and efficacy may be reduced in these individuals.

Recommendations regarding use in HIV-infected adults, adolescents, and children are the same as those for individuals who are not infected with HIV. Because HIV-infected individuals with chronic liver disease (including those coinfected with HBV or HCV) are at risk of fulminant hepatic failure if they acquire HAV, ACIP, AAP, CDC, NIH, IDSA, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and others recommend that such individuals receive HepA vaccine. Response to the vaccine may be reduced in those with CD4+ T-cell counts <200 cells/mm3; some experts suggest delaying vaccination until patient is receiving antiretroviral therapy and CD4+ T-cell count is >200 cells/mm3. Assess antibody response 1 month after vaccination; revaccinate nonresponders.

Concomitant Illness

A decision to administer or delay vaccination in an individual with a current or recent febrile illness depends on the severity of symptoms and etiology of the illness.

Some manufacturers state the vaccine may be given to individuals with acute infection or febrile illness if withholding the vaccine poses greater risk to the patient.

ACIP states that minor acute illness, such as mild diarrhea or mild upper respiratory tract infection (with or without fever) generally does not preclude vaccination, but vaccination should be deferred in individuals with moderate or severe acute illness (with or without fever).

Individuals with Bleeding Disorders

Because bleeding may occur following IM administration in individuals with thrombocytopenia or a bleeding disorder (e.g., hemophilia) or in those receiving anticoagulant therapy, use caution in such individuals.

ACIP states that vaccines may be given IM to individuals who have bleeding disorders or are receiving anticoagulant therapy if a clinician familiar with the patient’s bleeding risk determines that the preparation can be administered with reasonable safety. In these cases, use a fine needle (23 gauge) to administer the vaccine and apply firm pressure to the injection site (without rubbing) for ≥2 minutes. If patient is receiving antihemophilia therapy, administer the IM vaccine shortly after a scheduled dose of such therapy.

Advise individual and/or their family about the risk of hematoma from IM injections.

Pre- and Postvaccination Serologic Testing

Prevaccination testing for susceptibility to HAV is not usually indicated unless such testing would be less costly than unnecessarily vaccinating an individual who is already immune. Natural HAV infection produces lifelong immunity and high rates of HAV seropositivity are present in some populations for whom HepA vaccination is recommended. However, vaccination of an individual with preexisting immunity is not associated with any unusual risk.

Prevaccination serologic testing is not indicated before routine or catch-up vaccination of children or most adolescents.

Prevaccination serologic testing can be considered for adults who were born in or resided for extensive periods in geographic areas with intermediate or high levels of endemic HAV (e.g., Central and South America, Africa, Asia), older adolescents and adults in populations or groups with a high prevalence of infection (e.g., Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Hispanics), adults >40 years of age, adult men who have sex with men, and adults who illicitly use injectable or noninjectable drugs.

If prevaccination testing is indicated, commercially available tests that measure total anti-HAV (i.e., both IgG and IgM anti-HAV) are used. A positive result indicates the individual is immune as the result of past infection or vaccination.

Routine screening of contacts for preexisting HAV immunity prior to administration of HAV postexposure prophylaxis is not recommended. However, because HAV infection cannot be diagnosed reliably by clinical presentation alone, serologic confirmation of HAV in the index case is recommended before HAV postexposure prophylaxis in contacts.

Postvaccination serologic testing to confirm HAV immunity is not necessary in most individuals because of the high rate of vaccine response among adults and children. When HepA vaccine is used in HIV-infected individuals, some experts recommend assessing antibody response 1 month after vaccination and revaccinating nonresponders. The National Hemophilia Foundation’s Medical and Scientific Advisory Council (MASAC) strongly recommends such testing following HepA vaccination in adults and children with hemophilia.

Use of Fixed Combinations

Whenever the fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) is used, consider the contraindications and precautions associated with both antigens.

Although an accelerated dosing schedule of the fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) can be used when necessary (e.g., for travelers), a booster dose is necessary 1 year later. (See Adults ≥18 Years of Age (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) under Dosage.) The ACIP states that HepA-HepB (Twinrix) should not be used for preexposure vaccination of travelers who will depart within 2 weeks after receipt of the vaccine; the vaccine contains less HAV antigen and data are not available regarding efficacy in this situation.

Fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (HepA-HepB; Twinrix) should not be used for HAV postexposure prophylaxis; the vaccine contains less HAV antigen and data are not available regarding efficacy in this situation.

Improper Storage and Handling

Improper storage or handling of vaccines may result in loss of vaccine potency and reduced immune response in vaccinees.

Inspect all vaccines upon delivery and monitor during storage to ensure that the appropriate temperature is maintained.

Do not administer HepA vaccine that has been mishandled or has not been stored at the recommended temperature. (See Storage under Stability.) If there are concerns about mishandling, contact the manufacturer or state or local health departments for guidance on whether the vaccine is usable.

Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Havrix or Vaqta: Category C.

Twinrix: Category C. Pregnancy registry at 888-452-9622. Clinicians or vaccinees should report any exposure to the vaccine that occurs during pregnancy.

Manufacturers state HepA vaccine may be used during pregnancy if clearly needed.

Because HepA vaccine is an inactivated vaccine, the theoretical risk to the fetus is expected to be low, ACIP, AAP, AAFP, ACOG, and ACP state the vaccine may be used in pregnant women when indicated for preexposure vaccination in high-risk groups (including travelers) or for postexposure prophylaxis.

If only short-term protection against HAV infection is needed during pregnancy, consider passive immunization with IGIM as an alternative to active immunization with HepA vaccine.

Lactation

Use with caution in nursing women.

Because inactivated vaccines do not multiply within the body, they should not pose any unusual problems for lactating women or their infants.

Pediatric Use

Havrix or Vaqta: Safety and efficacy not established in children <12 months of age. In young infants, passively acquired maternal anti-HAV antibody may interfere with the active immune response to HepA vaccine. Passively acquired antibody declines to undetectable levels in most infants by 1 year of age, and the vaccine is highly immunogenic in children who begin the vaccine series after 1 year of age (regardless of maternal anti-HAV status).

Twinrix: Safety and efficacy not established in children <18 years of age.

Geriatric Use

Havrix : Clinical studies did not include sufficient numbers of patients ≥65 years of age to determine whether geriatric patients respond differently from younger patients; other clinical experience has not revealed evidence of age-related differences.

Vaqta: Clinical studies and postmarketing safety studies included individuals ≥65 years of age. No overall differences in immunogenicity or safety were observed between geriatric and younger patients and there has been no evidence of age-related differences, but the possibility that some older patients may exhibit increased sensitivity to the vaccine cannot be ruled out.

Twinrix: Clinical studies did not include sufficient numbers of individuals ≥65 years of age to determine whether geriatric individuals respond differently than younger adults.

Hepatic Impairment

Individuals with chronic liver disease may have lower antibody responses to HepA vaccine than healthy individuals. (See Actions.)

Common Adverse Effects

Havrix and Vaqta: Injection site reactions (soreness, tenderness, pain, erythema, warmth, induration), headache, GI effects (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia), irritability, fatigue/asthenia, fever, rash.

Twinrix: Adverse effects similar to those reported when monovalent HepA vaccine and monovalent HepB vaccine are administered alone or concurrently at different sites.

Interactions for Hepatitis A Virus Vaccine Inactivated

Other Vaccines

Although specific studies may not be available evaluating concurrent administration with each antigen, simultaneous administration with other age-appropriate vaccines, including live virus vaccines, toxoids, or inactivated or recombinant vaccines, during the same health-care visit is not expected to affect immunologic responses or adverse reactions to any of the preparations. Immunization with HepA vaccine can be integrated with immunization against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), hepatitis B, influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, meningococcal disease, pneumococcal disease, poliomyelitis, and varicella. However, each vaccine should be administered using a different syringe and different injection site.

Specific Drugs and Laboratory Tests

Drug or Test

Interaction

Comments

Anti-infective agents

Concurrent use of anti-infectives generally does not affect the immune response to inactivated vaccines, including HepA vaccine or fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (Twinrix)

Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed (DTaP)

May be administered concurrently with DTaP (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Haemophilus b (Hib) vaccine

Concomitant administration of Havrix HepA vaccine with Hib polysaccharide conjugate (tetanus toxoid conjugate) vaccine (PRP-T; OmniHIB [not commercially available in the US]) and DTaP at different sites in children 15–18 months of age did not affect the immune response to Havrix or Hib vaccine; there was a higher incidence of some adverse effects (e.g., irritability, drowsiness, loss of appetite) in those who received Havrix concurrently with PRP-T and DTaP than in those who received Havrix alone

May be given concurrently (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine

Simultaneous administration of monovalent HepA vaccine and monovalent HepB vaccine does not interfere with the immune response or increase the frequency of adverse effects to either vaccine

A 3-dose series of the fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (Twinrix) results in immune responses and adverse effects similar to those reported when a 2-dose series of monovalent HepA vaccine (Havrix) and a 3-dose series of monovalent HepB vaccine (Engerix-B) is given concurrently in opposite arms

Monovalent HepA vaccine and monovalent HepB vaccine may be given simultaneously (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Alternatively, may be given simultaneously as the fixed-combination vaccine containing HepA vaccine and HepB vaccine (Twinrix)

Immune globulin (IGIM)

Anti-HAV passively acquired from IGIM may interfere with the active antibody response to HepA vaccine; although reduced titers of anti-HAV may occur in adults who receive IGIM and the vaccine concurrently, the seroconversion rate is not affected

It has been suggested that because vaccine-induced titers generally are higher than antibody levels considered protective, the reduced immunogenicity associated with passively acquired anti-HAV may not be clinically important

ACIP states that development of a protective antibody response should not be impaired if HepA vaccine is administered concurrently or at any interval before or after administration of an antibody-containing preparation

If combined active immunization with HepA vaccine and passive immunization with IGIM is used (e.g., for postexposure prophylaxis), the first dose of vaccine should be administered simultaneously with IGIM (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Immunosuppressive agents (e.g., alkylating agents, antimetabolites, corticosteroids, cytotoxic agents, radiation)

Potential for decreased antibody response to vaccines

Vaccines generally should be administered 2 weeks prior to initiation of immunosuppressive therapy or deferred until at least 3 months after such therapy is discontinued

Additional doses of HepA vaccine may be required to induce protective levels of HAV antibody

Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR)

Concomitant administration of HepA vaccine and MMR (at different sites) did not affect immune response to the measles, mumps, rubella, or hepA antigens

May be given simultaneously (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Pneumococcal vaccine

Pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7; Prevnar): Concomitant administration with Havrix in children 15 months of age did not affect the immune response to either vaccine

May be given simultaneously (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7; Prevnar): Manufacturer states Havrix may be administered simultaneously with the fourth dose of Prevnar (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Tests to diagnose HAV infection

Individuals who have received HepA vaccine and are being evaluated for suspected HAV infection using serologic tests that detect IgM anti-HAV may have a positive test result in the absence of infection, especially if the test is performed within 2–3 weeks after vaccine administration; only 1% of vaccinees had detectable IgM anti-HAV 1 month after vaccination

Typhoid vaccine

Parenteral inactivated typhoid vaccine (Typhim Vi): Concomitant administration with HepA vaccine does not appear to affect the immune response or adverse reactions to either vaccine

May be given simultaneously (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Varicella vaccine

Monovalent varicella vaccine (Varivax): Concomitant administration with HepA vaccine and with MMR at different sites did not affect antibody response to HepA vaccine; immunogenicity data insufficient to date to assess response to varicella vaccine

Yellow fever vaccine

HepA vaccine and yellow fever vaccine may be given concomitantly (using different syringes and different injection sites)

Stability

Storage

Parenteral

Injectable Suspension, for IM Use

Havrix and Vaqta: 2–8°C. Do not freeze; if freezing occurs, discard vaccine.

Twinrix: 2–8°C. Do not freeze; if freezing occurs, discard vaccine.

Havrix, Vaqta, and Twinrix do not contain thimerosal or any other preservatives.

Actions

  • HepA vaccine is a noninfectious, sterile suspension of cell culture-adapted, attenuated HAV. The vaccine virus is propagated in human MRC-5 diploid fibroblasts, purified, inactivated with formalin, and adsorbed onto an aluminum adjuvant.

  • HepA vaccine is commercially available as monovalent vaccine (Havrix, Vaqta) and as a fixed-combination vaccine containing both HAV and HBV antigens (HepA-HepB; Twinrix).

  • Havrix and Vaqta contain different HAV antigens, but are considered to have equivalent immunogenicity when administered in recommended dosages. Twinrix contains the same HAV antigen as Havrix (but in a lower concentration) and the same HBV antigen as Engerix-B HepB vaccine.

  • HepA vaccine stimulates active immunity to HAV infection by inducing production of HAV-specific IgG and IgM antibodies (anti-HAV).

  • HepA vaccine is highly immunogenic in most adults, adolescents, and children ≥1 year of age. Anti-HAV is detectable in most individuals within 2 weeks after a single dose of monovalent HepA vaccine; protection may not be complete until 4 weeks after the dose. At least 94% of adults, adolescents, and children develop protective antibody within 4 weeks after a single dose; almost 100% seroconvert after 2 vaccine doses.

  • A reduced immune response to HepA vaccine and lower antibody titers may occur in immunocompromised individuals (e.g., HIV-infected individuals), individuals with chronic liver disease, and liver or kidney transplant recipients.

  • In a study in adults with chronic liver disease (chronic HBV, chronic HCV, alcoholic cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, chronic hepatitis/cryptogenic cirrhosis, hemochromatosis primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis), seroconversion rates after first dose of HepA vaccine were lower than those in healthy adults; however, seroconversion rates 1 month after the second (booster) dose were similar in both groups.

  • Although vaccine-induced anti-HAV levels are lower than those induced by natural infection, protection against HAV is virtually complete in those who develop anti-HAV after immunization.

  • The principal mode of transmission of HAV is enteric (i.e., through fecal contamination and oral ingestion), most commonly from person to person, particularly from children to adults. HAV also can be spread by infected food handlers, sewage-contaminated drinking water, raw or undercooked shellfish (e.g., clams, mussels, oysters) from contaminated waters, uncooked contaminated foods (e.g. fruits, vegetables), poor hygienic conditions during travel to certain areas of the world, closed living conditions (e.g., among institutionalized children and adults), health-care settings, and parenteral transmission (e.g., transfusions of blood or plasma-derived preparations from HAV-infected individuals, sharing needles with infected individuals).

  • Natural HAV infection results in lifelong immunity. Because of HepA vaccination programs, the rate of HAV infection has declined sharply in the US during the last decade, especially among children. However, an increasingly larger proportion of older Americans are susceptible to the disease (i.e., at an age when the risk of fulminant hepatitis is increased).

  • The minimum titer of anti-HAV conferring protection against HAV has not been established. ACIP states that any level of anti-HAV detected by commercially available assays can be considered protective; however, individuals who are anti-HAV negative may still have protective levels of anti-HAV depending on the lower limits of detection of the assay.

Advice to Patients

  • Provide copy of manufacturer’s patient information to the patient and/or patient’s parent or guardian. Prior to administration of each vaccine dose, also provide a copy of the appropriate CDC Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) to the patient or patient’s legal representative as required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (VISs are available at [Web]).

  • Advise patient and/or patient’s parent or guardian of the risks and benefits of vaccination with HepA vaccine.

  • Importance of receiving both the initial dose and second (booster) dose to ensure the highest level of protection against HAV.

  • Importance of informing clinicians if any adverse reactions (e.g., hypersensitivity reactions) occur. Clinicians or individuals can report any adverse reactions that occur following vaccination to Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) at 800-822-7967 or [Web].

  • Importance of informing clinicians of existing or contemplated concomitant therapy, including prescription and OTC drugs, as well as any concomitant illnesses.

  • Importance of women informing clinicians if they are or plan to become pregnant or plan to breast-feed.

  • Importance of informing patients of other important precautionary information. (See Cautions.)

Preparations

Excipients in commercially available drug preparations may have clinically important effects in some individuals; consult specific product labeling for details.

Please refer to the ASHP Drug Shortages Resource Center for information on shortages of one or more of these preparations.

Hepatitis A Virus Vaccine Inactivated

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Parenteral

Injectable suspension, for IM use

25 units (of viral antigen) per 0.5 mL

Vaqta Pediatric/Adolescent

Merck

50 units (of viral antigen) per mL

Vaqta Adult

Merck

720 ELISA units (of viral antigen) per 0.5 mL

Havrix Pediatric

GlaxoSmithKline

1440 ELISA units (of viral antigen) per mL

Havrix Adult

GlaxoSmithKline

Hepatitis A Inactivated and Hepatitis B (Recombinant) Vaccine (HepA-HepB)

Routes

Dosage Forms

Strengths

Brand Names

Manufacturer

Parenteral

Injectable suspension, for IM use

Hepatitis A Virus Vaccine Inactivated 720 ELISA units (of viral antigen) and Hepatitis B Vaccine (Recombinant) 20 mcg (of hepatitis B surface antigen) per mL

Twinrix

GlaxoSmithKline

AHFS DI Essentials™. © Copyright 2022, Selected Revisions January 1, 2010. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 4500 East-West Highway, Suite 900, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

† Use is not currently included in the labeling approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Show article references