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Cancer Surgeons Advise Against Removal of Healthy Breast

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FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- Only certain women with cancer in one breast should have their healthy breast removed in an attempt to prevent cancer, a leading group of breast surgeons maintains. The new position statement from the American Society of Breast Surgeons comes at a time when more breast cancer patients are asking doctors to remove the unaffected breast -- a procedure known as contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. "Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy is a growing trend that has...

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Fentanyl-Laced 'Norco' Is Lethal, Report Warns

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FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- A street drug sold illegally as the prescription painkiller Norco is much stronger and more dangerous than the real medication, researchers warn. "Street Norco is almost indistinguishable from brand-name Norco in appearance, but can be lethal," said Dr. Patil Armenian of the University of California, San Francisco. She is the lead author of a new case study involving the drug. The street drug combines fentanyl -- the synthetic opioid painkiller linked to the death of...

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Florida Reports 1st Locally Transmitted Zika Infections in U.S.

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FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- The United States is apparently experiencing its first local outbreak of the Zika virus, with four human infections reported in South Florida very likely caused by mosquito bites, federal health officials announced Friday. One woman and three men in Miami-Dade and Broward counties have tested positive for Zika, and appear to have contracted the virus via mosquito bites, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Friday during a media briefing. In a statement, the federal Centers for...

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Humans Can Pass Staph Germs to Monkeys

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FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- A new study finds that monkeys can acquire Staphylococcus aureus bacteria from people. Many deadly diseases in people originally came from animals, but this study shows that dangerous pathogens can also move from people to animals, the researchers said. The investigators discovered that certain strains of S. aureus in green monkeys in The Gambia were acquired from humans. Most of the human-to-monkey transmission likely occurred 2,700 years ago. But two of the S....

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Treating Psoriasis May Reduce Risk for Other Ills

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FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- Treating the skin disease psoriasis might reduce your risk for other health problems as well, a dermatology expert says. About 7.5 million people in the United States have the chronic skin disease. The inflammatory effects of psoriasis can affect the entire body, said Dr. Jashin Wu, director of dermatology research at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles Medical Center. "People with psoriasis, particularly those with more severe disease, have an increased risk for a variety...

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Florida Reports 1st Locally Transmitted Zika Infections in U.S.

Posted today in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- The United States is apparently experiencing its first local outbreak of the Zika virus, with four human infections reported in South Florida very likely caused by mosquito bites, federal health officials announced Friday. One woman and three men in Miami-Dade and Broward counties have tested positive for Zika, and appear to have contracted the virus via mosquito bites, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Friday during a media briefing. In a statement, the federal Centers for...

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Archeological Finds Push First Known Cancer Back 2 Million Years

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- Researchers report that they have unearthed the earliest evidence of bone tumors and cancers, dating back almost 2 million years. The discoveries challenge the belief that cancer is a disease of modern life, the study authors said. "Modern medicine tends to assume that cancers and tumors in humans are diseases caused by modern lifestyles and environments. Our studies show the origins of these diseases occurred in our ancient relatives millions of years before modern...

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Florida Reports First Locally Transmitted Zika Infections in U.S.

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- The United States is apparently experiencing its first local outbreak of the Zika virus, with four human infections reported in south Florida very likely caused by mosquito bites, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Friday. "All the evidence we have seen indicates that this is mosquito-borne transmission that occurred several weeks ago in several blocks in Miami," said CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden. "We continue to recommend that everyone in...

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Pregnancy Problems More Likely With Baby Boys, Study Suggests

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- Serious pregnancy complications are more likely when women are carrying baby boys, new research suggests. After analyzing more than half a million births in Australia, researchers said the baby's gender could be linked to the health of both mother and child. "The sex of the baby has a direct association with pregnancy complications," said study first author Dr. Petra Verburg, of the Robinson Research Institute at the University of Adelaide in Australia. Boy babies...

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Weight-Loss Surgery Doesn't Boost Bone Health: Study

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- Weight-loss surgery helps severely obese patients shed pounds and can even reverse diabetes, but a new Canadian study suggests it can't erase an existing higher risk of broken bones. Researchers found that compared to other people, weight-loss surgery patients were in greater jeopardy of fractures both before and after they underwent their procedure. According to the study authors, the findings suggest that being obese doesn't provide as much protection against broken...

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Almost 3 in 10 Women Get Pregnant Naturally After Fertility Treatments

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FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- Nearly one-third of women who have infertility treatments get pregnant naturally within a few years of stopping treatment, a new study suggests. Researchers conducted an online survey of 403 women who had infertility treatments called assisted reproductive technologies (ART), such as in-vitro fertilization. Ninety-six women didn't get pregnant during treatment. But, 34 of the women later got pregnant naturally. Three hundred and seven women conceived while receiving...

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New Antibiotic Discovered in the Nose

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

A new antibiotic has been discovered in people's noses. German researchers analyzed germs that inhabit the human body and found that about 30 percent of people had Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in their noses, but 70 percent did not, the Associated Press reported. Those without S. aureus have another type of bacteria -- Staphyloccus lugdunensis -- in the nose that produces an antibiotic that keeps S. aureus in check, according to the study published online in the journal Nature. The...

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Is Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Real?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016, -- Gluten sensitivity appears to be a real medical problem, and not a figment of the popular imagination conjured up by the gluten-free craze, a new study contends. Some people suffer changes within their bodies after eating gluten that are separate and distinct from those that accompany either celiac disease or wheat allergy, researchers report. "We don't know what is triggering this response, but this study is the first to show that there are clear biological changes...

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Eczema's Effects More Than Skin Deep

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- People dealing with the itchy skin condition known as eczema may have other medical conditions to cope with as well, including heart disease, a dermatologist says. Eczema, which causes dry, red patches of skin and intense itchiness, affects an estimated one-quarter of children in the United States. And, as many as seven million adults also have eczema, Dr. Jonathan Silverberg said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "Although it affects the skin,...

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New Guidelines Issued for Cancer Patients' Post-Treatment Pain

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- More people are surviving cancer, but many are left with persistent pain after treatment. New guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recommend that doctors routinely screen for such pain. The guidelines also advise doctors to consider the use of non-traditional treatments for pain. These include hypnosis, meditation and medical marijuana where it's legal. ASCO also cautioned doctors to assess patients' risk for overuse of opioid...

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The English Bulldog's Health Has Gone to the Dogs

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 -- They may be adorable, but English bulldogs are sicker than almost any other breed of dog. And, a new study says their genes don't offer much opportunity to boost their health. The English bulldog's genetic makeup has a lot of changes linked to attempts to adjust its appearance as a breed. These changes disrupted the immune system of the English bulldog, making it harder for the breed to fight off illness, the researchers said. Their genes have also become too similar...

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Health Highlights: July 29, 2016

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: New Antibiotic Discovered in the Nose A new antibiotic has been discovered in people's noses. German researchers analyzed germs that inhabit the human body and found that about 30 percent of people had Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in their noses, but 70 percent did not, the Associated Press reported. Those without S. aureus have another type of bacteria -- Staphyloccus lugdunensis -- in the...

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Health Tip: Get More Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Omega-3 fatty acids may improve your heart health and help you ward off heart disease. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests these sources: Oils from soybeans, flaxseed and canola. Walnuts or walnut oil. Fatty fish, including salmon, mackerel, lake trout, sardines and albacore tuna (choose varieties packed in water). Eggs labeled as containing omega-3 fatty acids.

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Health Tip: If You Have a Lot of Moles

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Having lots of moles may mean you're worried about skin cancer. Checking your skin often for changes and certain warning signs can help alleviate those fears. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends: Regularly inspect your skin, evaluating all of your moles. Look for any changes or unusual looking moles. See your dermatologist if any of your moles bleed, itch or change. Don't lie in the sun or use a tanning bed. Use sunscreen whenever outdoors to help prevent sunburn. See a...

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'Active Surveillance' of Prostate Cancer Doesn't Dampen Quality of Life

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 -- Men with low-risk prostate cancer report a good quality of life after choosing active surveillance as a treatment for their disease, a new study finds. Active surveillance for prostate cancer means a man chooses not to have surgery, radiation or chemotherapy, but instead follows a regular schedule of tests and exams to make sure the cancer isn't growing rapidly, the U.S. National Cancer Institute says. The new study included 89 American men with low-risk prostate...

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