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Daily MedNews

Air Pollution at National Parks Keeps Visitors Away

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- Fresh air is in short supply at U.S. national parks, a new study shows. Researchers found that from 1990 to 2014, average concentrations of ozone air pollution in 33 of the nation's largest national parks were the same as in the 20 largest cities in the country. Despite improvements over the last two decades, the air quality in many national parks is unhealthy for... Read more

Where Are Opioid Painkillers Prescribed the Most?

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- A close look at U.S. congressional districts has yielded new information about the opioid crisis: The highest rates of prescriptions for opioid painkillers are in the Southeast, Appalachia and the rural West. Focusing on prescribing rates for opioids like Oxycontin in congressional districts could help improve efforts to fight the nation's opioid addiction crisis,... Read more

In the ICU, Patients' Relatives Often Mum About Care Concerns

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- Many family members of intensive care unit (ICU) patients are reluctant to tell medical staff of worries about their loved one's care, a new study finds. "Speaking up is a key component of safety culture, yet our study -- the first to our knowledge to address this issue -- revealed substantial challenges for patients and families speaking up during an ICU stay," said... Read more

Affected by the Valsartan Heart Drug Recall? Here's What to Do

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- After the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced last week that certain brands of blood pressure medicines contained a carcinogen and were being recalled, many patients may wonder what's next for their cardiovascular care. The FDA said it mandated the recall because valsartan medicines from a Chinese manufacturer, Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceuticals, were found to... Read more

AHA: Stroke Survivor's Tattoo Gets People Talking

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Scars are a natural sign of healing, but not every physical trauma leaves a visible reminder. The only outward sign that 27-year-old Skylar Doerwaldt is a stroke survivor is of her choosing: a tattoo on her left forearm. The dark, jagged lines represent the arteries in her neck. It's a copy of the magnetic resonance angiography scan taken... Read more

More U.S. Teens Shunning Drugs, Alcohol

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- Over the last four decades, more American teenagers have decided to say no to drugs and alcohol, a new report shows. "There has been a steady increase in the proportion of students graduating high school who report never having tried alcohol, marijuana, tobacco or any other drugs," said study author Dr. Sharon Levy. She directs the adolescent substance use and... Read more

Cancer Survival Drops With Complementary Therapy: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- People with curable cancers who try "complementary therapy" often refuse some part of standard care. And they may die as a result, researchers say. U.S. cancer patients increasingly use complementary medicine -- a combination of standard care along with therapies that fall outside of mainstream medicine (such as acupuncture or massage). But little is known about the... Read more

Your Earliest Memories May Be False

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- Can you trust your very first childhood memories? Maybe not, a new study suggests. People's earliest memories are typically formed around 3 to 3.5 years of age, past research has shown. But in a survey of more than 6,600 people, British scientists found that 39 percent of participants claimed to have memories from age 2 or younger, with some people claiming memories... Read more

Adrenaline Shot Can Save Lives After Heart Stops, But at a Heavy Price

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- An adrenaline shot can restart your heart if it suddenly stops beating, but a new trial shows that chances are you might not return to much of a life if you survive. People who suffered cardiac arrest and were resuscitated with adrenaline had an almost doubled risk of severe brain damage, researchers found. "We found adrenaline does not increase your chances of... Read more

Selecting a Personal Trainer

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- A personal trainer can design an exercise program to meet your fitness goals, keep you motivated and adapt your training as you progress. But your first step is finding a qualified professional. While there aren't any national standards or minimum requirements for someone to call themselves a personal trainer, asking the right questions will help you hire the right... Read more

Adding or Switching Diabetes Drugs Can Put Patients at Risk: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- Using sulfonylurea drugs with or instead of metformin to control blood sugar increases type 2 diabetics' risk of serious complications, a new study finds. Metformin is a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes, meaning it is the first drug that will be tried. But sulfonylureas are the most often-used second-line treatment, commonly along with metformin. But little is... Read more

E-Cigarettes, Nicotine Patch During Pregnancy May Hike SIDS Risk

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- Using any form of nicotine during pregnancy or while nursing may raise a baby's risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), new animal research suggests. The findings indicate that nicotine patches or electronic cigarettes may not be a safe alternative to cigarettes during pregnancy, the study authors said. The findings appear in the July 18 Journal of... Read more

U.S. Deaths From Liver Disease Rising Rapidly

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 19, 2018 -- The Great Recession continues to take a grim toll: Since 2009, a growing number of Americans have died from liver disease and liver cancer. The increase among 25- to 34-year-olds is especially troubling because the deaths are due to cirrhosis, a disease caused by excessive drinking, the authors of a new study said. The researchers suspect the economic downturn in 2008... Read more

Health Highlights: July 18, 2018

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Controversial New Arizona Law OKs Use of Frozen Embryos After Divorce A new law in Arizona allows divorced people to go against the wishes of their former spouse and use their frozen embryos to have a baby. Supporters of the law that took effect July 1 say it will protect a spouse's right to... Read more

Health Tip: Prevent Bed Bugs at Home

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Bed bugs are excellent at hiding in the seams of chairs, in and around the bed and in the folds of cushions, the U.S. National Library of Medicine says. The agency suggests how to prevent bed bug infestation at home: Check secondhand furniture for any signs of bed bugs before purchasing. Use protective covers to encase mattresses and box springs. Check these regularly for holes. Reduce... Read more

Health Tip: Treating Heat-Related Illness

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- High summer temperatures pose a particular risk for the elderly, the National Institute on Aging says. Because of poor circulation and other factors, older people typically are at greater risk of heat-related illnesses, such as heat stroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion. The agency offers this "to-do" list if you think someone might have a heat-related illness: Call 911 without delay. Get... Read more

Longest Study Yet Finds Adult Kids of Lesbian Moms Are Doing Fine

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 -- Young adults raised by lesbian moms show the same mental well-being as those who grew up with heterosexual parents, a new study suggests. The findings, published in the July 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, come from the largest, longest-running study to track development of kids in "planned lesbian families." The study has been following the same... Read more

Endari (L-Glutamine) Supplement May Ease the Pain of Sickle Cell Disease

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 -- An FDA-approved supplement reduces episodes of severe pain in people with sickle cell disease, a new clinical trial shows. Endari, a medicine-grade version of the dietary supplement L-glutamine, reduced sickle cell patients' number of acute pain crises by 25 percent compared with a placebo, the researchers found. In addition, the supplement reduced hospitalizations... Read more

Does a Woman's Childbearing History Affect Her Alzheimer's Risk?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 -- A woman's pregnancy history may predict her risk for developing Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. "We found that women who had given birth to five or more children were 70 percent more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than women who gave birth to fewer children," said study author Dr. Ki Woong Kim, director of South Korea's National Institute of... Read more

Top of Teachers' To-Do List: Focus on the Positives

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, July 18, 2018 -- Students gain when teachers focus on positive behavior. So say British researchers who examined the impact of a program designed to train teachers to build strong social relationships with their students. They're encouraged to ignore minor bad behavior, and acknowledge good behavior. The program resulted in improved student behavior, concentration and mental health,... Read more

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