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Daily MedNews

A Wilderness Expert's Keys to Safety in the Great Outdoors

Posted today in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, Aug. 18, 2018 -- Some simple steps can reduce danger when you venture into the great outdoors, an expert says. "Knowing your limits, not trying to do too much, knowing where you're going and what you might encounter there and being aware of the environment you're in are the best ways to avoid problems outdoors," said Dr. Henderson McGinnis, an expert in wilderness medicine in... Read more

Is a Haywire Body Clock Tied to Mood Disorders?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- There may be a genetic link between mood disorders and the body's internal clock, a new study suggests. Research published earlier this year linked disruptions in the body clock (circadian rhythms) with an increased risk of mood issues such as depression and bipolar disorders. In this new study, researchers analyzed data from 71,500 people in the United Kingdom and... Read more

Magnetic Stimulation Device Approved to Treat Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- The Brainsway Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation System has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). OCD is a chronic condition characterized by uncontrollable, recurring thoughts and actions that a person feels the need to continually repeat. Government statistics show about 1 percent of people in the United... Read more

Genetic Testing for Cancer Lacking for Women on Medicare: Study

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- Testing for gene mutations linked to breast and ovarian cancer is rare among some Medicare patients who have the cancers and qualify for such tests, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from 12 southeastern states between 2000 and 2014. Only 8 percent of 92 women who met Medicare criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing received it within five years of their... Read more

More Opioid Users Getting Treatment Since Medicaid Expansion

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- The expansion of Medicaid that came along with the Affordable Care Act has made it easier for some opioid users to get treatment, new research suggests. In a study of nearly 12 million Medicaid patients, researchers found that while the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers decreased slightly, prescriptions for buprenorphine (Buprenex), a drug to treat... Read more

FDA Approves Brain Stimulation Device for OCD

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- A brain stimulation device to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has received approval for marketing Friday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Transcranial magnetic stimulation uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. The FDA approved it as a treatment for major depression in 2008 and for treating pain associated with certain migraines in... Read more

Eating Before Early Workout Helps Burn Carbs

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- If you exercise in the morning, it may be a good idea to eat breakfast first. A small British study finds that having breakfast before a morning workout triggers the body to burn more carbohydrates during exercise and also speeds digestion afterward. The study included 12 healthy men who did an hour of cycling in the morning. They either had a breakfast of porridge made... Read more

Generic EpiPen Gains Doctors' Approval

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval Thursday of the first generic versions of the EpiPen and EpiPen Jr. has pleased medical experts, who hope it will make the lifesaving medication more affordable and available. "It's exciting for lots of reasons," said Dr. Michael Blaiss, executive medical director of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and... Read more

Clinical Trials Balance Out Urban, Rural Cancer Survival Rates

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- Differences in survival rates between rural and urban cancer patients may be due to the kind of care they receive, a review of cancer clinical trials contends. Research has shown that cancer patients in rural areas have lower survival rates than those in urban areas. For example, cancer death rates between 2011 and 2015 were 180 per 100,000 people in rural areas and 158... Read more

AHA: Gout Could Increase Heart Disease Risk

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- Having a type of inflammatory arthritis called gout may worsen heart-related outcomes for people being treated for coronary artery disease, according to new research. The study, published Aug. 17 in The Journal of the American Heart Association, sought to clarify older research on the link between cardiovascular disease and gout, which occurs... Read more

A Little 'Horseplay' Eases Veterans' Mind, Body & Soul

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- U.S. Navy veteran Lisa Conway was having trouble coping with mobility issues related to two newly diagnosed autoimmune diseases when her therapist suggested equine-assisted therapy. "I rode horses mainly as a youngster and a couple of times as an adult. When my therapist suggested equine therapy, I thought, 'Are you kidding me? How am I going to get on a horse?' " she... Read more

Maybe It's Time to Get in the Game

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- Team sports aren't just for kids. They offer adults a wealth of benefits, including a greater feeling of well-being, reduced stress and a strong sense of community. You have many options for finding an adult club or team-based sport in your area. Your local park and rec department or "Y" might sponsor such activities. The World Adult Kickball Association has expanded to... Read more

AHA: Personalized Guidelines for Treating Adults With Congenital Heart Disease

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The growing population of adults with congenital heart disease could soon begin to see more personalized care, according to new guidelines released Thursday. Diagnosis and follow-up care for people over 17 will be based on more than their heart anatomy. It will expand to include how the condition is playing out in their own body. The guide... Read more

The 'Right' Amount of Carbs May Help You Live Longer

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 -- You've probably heard about the high-carb diet and the low-carb diet, but a new study suggests a moderate-carb diet could be the key to longevity. Researchers followed more than 15,000 people in the United States for a median of 25 years and found that low-carb diets (fewer than 40 percent of calories from carbohydrates) and high-carb diets (more than 70 percent of... Read more

Health Tip: Achieve Healthier Hair

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Want your hair to look healthier? The American Academy of Dermatology suggests how to achieve healthier locks: Wash oily hair more frequently. Wash chemically treated hair less often. As you age, your scalp should make less oil, so you may not need to shampoo as often. Watch for flakes -- which may indicate dandruff or another scalp condition. Concentrate shampoo on the scalp instead... Read more

Health Tip: Tongue Scrapers Won't Prevent Bad Breath: Experts

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- There is no scientific evidence that tongue scraping will prevent bad breath, the American Dental Association says. Such devices may clean the tongue, but the bacteria that cause bad breath can grow back very quickly, the ADA says. Here's what it recommends to keep your breath fresher: Brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste. Floss between teeth daily. Eat a healthy diet... Read more

Health Highlights: Aug. 17, 2018

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: U.S. Measles Outbreak Hits 107 Cases in 21 States, D.C. A measles outbreak that's so far affected 21 states and the District of Columbia is being investigated by U.S. health officials. As of July 14, there had been 107 cases reported since the start of the year, according to the U.S. Centers... Read more

New Blood Test Spots Parasitic Infection in Pregnant Women

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 -- A low-cost blood test can identify pregnant women with the parasitic infection toxoplasmosis, researchers report. People typically acquire the Toxoplasma gondii parasite by eating undercooked contaminated meat or through exposure to infected cat feces. And an infected pregnant woman can pass it to her fetus. The transmission of the parasite puts the fetus at risk for... Read more

FDA Approves 1st Generic EpiPen

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 -- The first generic version of the EpiPen was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday, paving the way for more affordable versions of the lifesaving allergy emergency medication. Though other injectors are available, this drug, made by Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, is the first the FDA has said is the equivalent of the EpiPen. It can be automatically... Read more

Blood Test in Early Pregnancy May Predict Mom's Diabetes Risk

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, Aug. 16, 2018 -- A blood test seems to detect signs of gestational diabetes as early as the 10th week of pregnancy, a new U.S. government study says. Gestational diabetes occurs only in pregnancy and can pose a serious health threat to mothers and babies. It increases the mother's risk of pregnancy-related high blood pressure disorders, cesarean delivery, as well as heart disease and... Read more

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