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Meth Addicts' Hearts May Improve If They Quit

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 29, 2017 -- Methamphetamine users who quit the drug may get a break: New research suggests it's possible to reverse heart damage with proper medical treatment. Research has previously linked meth use to heart problems that can contribute to death. But it hadn't been clear if stopping the drug use resulted in better heart health. The small study found that after discontinuing methamphetamine use, participants were less likely to die, or suffer a nonfatal stroke or have to be...

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Brush Up on Swim Safety for Summer

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 29, 2017 -- Before your family pulls out their swimsuits this Memorial Day, brush up on water safety, for your kids' sake. Here are some tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics on how to make sure children are protected while they spend their summers in or around pools, lakes and oceans: Don't leave kids alone in the water, and make sure a responsible adult is watching them closely. "Touch supervision" -- being within an arm's length of a child in the water -- is...

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To Lose Weight, Start With Dairy Swaps

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 29, 2017 -- Losing weight comes down to simple arithmetic: Eat fewer calories than you burn off. Here's a good way you can accomplish this without going hungry. Switch out high-calorie foods for low-calorie options to cut calories without cutting portion sizes. Dairy food is a good place to start, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. If you're still using whole milk and cream, make gradual changes to lower-fat versions. Start by switching from whole milk to 2 percent...

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Lawn Mowers Are Risky Business for Kids

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 29, 2017 -- Though mowing lawns has long been a source of income for young people, experts warn that lawn mowers pose a major safety risk to children. "We need to remind people that these are dangerous machines, and the consequences are devastating," Mariano Garay, a fourth year medical student at Penn State College of Medicine, said in a school news release. Garay has studied lawn mower injuries in children. About 13,000 children were treated for lawn mower injuries in U.S....

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Health Tip: Don't Fear Strength Training

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Strength training helps you build more muscle and burn more fat, but women shouldn't avoid it out of fear of getting bulky. The American Council on Exercise recommends: If you want to increase strength, opt for heavier weights and fewer repetitions. To build endurance, opt for more repetitions with lighter weights. Keep at it. After a few months, women and men will both see about a 20 percent to 40 percent improvement in strength. Determine your body type, and set your goals...

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Health Tip: Dealing With a Dog Bite

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Dog bites happen, even if parents are careful. Knowing the steps to take quickly can help keep your child safe. Here's advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics: Ask the dog's owners for their contact information, proof of rabies vaccination and contact information for the dog's veterinarian. As soon as possible, use soap and water to wash the wound. Call your child's pediatrician to ask if the bite needs treatment. The doctor may notify police of the bite. Carry out your...

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5 Essential Tips for Hospital Patients and Their Visitors

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, May 28, 2017 -- Infections picked up in the hospital can be serious, even life-threatening. But patients and their visitors can help prevent the spread of dangerous germs by keeping their hands clean, health care professionals say. The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists recommends the following five tips for all hospital patients and their visitors: Don't touch your face, eyes, nose, mouth or any open cuts or wounds after touching anything in the hospital room, such as bed...

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Fire Up the Grill Safely This Holiday Weekend

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, May 27, 2017 -- Safety should be on the front burner when you fire up the barbecue this Memorial Day, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) says. Propane used in gas grills is highly flammable and about 30 people in the United States are injured each year due to gas grill fires and explosions. Many of these incidents occur when someone lights a grill that hasn't been used in a while, or just after refilling and reattaching the gas container. The CPSC said people should...

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Diesel Pollution May Damage the Heart

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- Pollution from diesel engines may cause heart damage, a British study suggests. "There is strong evidence that particulate matter emitted mainly from diesel road vehicles is associated with increased risk of heart attack, heart failure and death," said lead author Dr. Nay Aung, a cardiologist and research fellow at Queen Mary University of London. Aung's team reviewed data from more than 4,200 people in the United Kingdom. The study participants had undergone magnetic...

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Bystander CPR Helps Save Brain Function After Near-Drowning

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- Near-drowning victims are more likely to recover with good brain function if bystanders immediately begin chest compressions rather than wait for emergency personnel to arrive, researchers report. "What we found is that when bystanders begin CPR [cardiopulmonary resuscitation] before emergency personnel arrive, the person has a higher chance of leaving the hospital and leading a life reasonably close to the one they had before the drowning," said study leader Dr. Joshua...

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Warming Climate, More Sleepless Nights?

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- The rising nighttime temperatures that come with climate change could mean poorer sleep for millions, a new study suggests. Americans' reported nights of insufficient sleep more than double as nighttime temperatures rise during summer months, an analysis of federal health data and weather records concludes. And people will have even more trouble getting rest in years to come due to climate change, predicts study lead author Nick Obradovich. He's a postdoctoral fellow...

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Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- Depression appears to raise the risk of falls in elderly people, but the proper dose of psychiatric medication may eliminate that risk, a new study suggests. "Many interventions to prevent falls are expensive and time-intensive, but this is a simple and inexpensive matter of encouraging continued use of psychiatric medication while improving monitoring of fall risk and adjusting medication appropriately," said lead researcher Geoffrey Hoffman. He is a research fellow...

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Could a Century-Old Drug Help Ease Autism Symptoms?

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- A drug first used in the early 1900s to treat sleeping sickness has shown promise in an early trial as a potential treatment for autism. The study involved just 10 boys, aged 5 to 14, with autism. This was the first human trial to attempt to replicate encouraging results seen in work with mice, the researchers noted. The drug is called suramin. "The main finding was that a single dose of suramin was safe and produced improvements in language, social interaction and...

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Promising Results for Ixekizumab Against Psoriatic Arthritis

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- A new drug might help ease the pain and disability of a form of arthritis often linked to psoriasis. According to Stanford University researchers, psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory joint disorder tied to an out-of-control immune response. The disease affects about one in every 200 people and is often accompanied by the autoimmune skin disorder psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis typically arises after the age of 30 and can bring stiffness, pain and swelling of the...

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One Man's Trash Is Another's Fiber

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- Wasted food results in a huge loss of important nutrients for Americans, new research contends. "Huge quantities of nutritious foods end up in landfills instead of meeting Americans' dietary needs," said study lead author Marie Spiker, a fellow at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future in Baltimore. "Our findings illustrate how food waste exists alongside inadequate intake of many nutrients," Spiker said in a Hopkins news release. For the study, researchers...

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Gut Bacteria Changes After Some Weight-Loss Surgeries

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- A type of weight-loss surgery -- called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass -- triggers major changes in the microbial population of the digestive tract, a new study finds. Specifically, the procedure leads to increased diversity of bacteria in the gut, and a microbial population distinct from obese and normal-weight people, researchers found. "Diversity is good," said study co-author Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown of Arizona State University. She and her colleagues said the findings may...

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5 Food Groups to Jump-Start Nutrition

Posted 4 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- Most Americans still don't eat enough nutrient-rich foods from key groups including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and low-fat dairy, according to federal health statistics. And they take in too many refined grains, saturated fats, added sugars and salt. What to do? Here are 5 types of foods you can add today to give your diet a boost. Dark green vegetables top the list. Make a point of eating choices like spinach and other greens, broccoli and Brussels...

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Health Highlights: May 26, 2017

Posted 4 days ago in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: German Parents Who Don't Have Children Vaccinated Will Face Fines Parents who don't have their children vaccinated will face fines, the German health minister says. The fines of up to $2,806 are necessary because of a measles epidemic, Hermann Grohe told the daily Bild, BBC News reported. "Continuing deaths from measles cannot leave anyone indifferent," he said. Kindergartens will be...

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Scientists Report Progress on Genetic Test for Anal Cancer

Posted 4 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- A new genetic test may detect anal cancer, a disease that's become more common in women, gay and bisexual men, and people with HIV. "If other studies confirm and build upon these findings, this promising research could be used to develop a less invasive method to help doctors identify people who are at a higher risk of anal cancer and avoid unnecessary procedures for those who are at a lower risk," said Dr. Rachel Orritt, Cancer Research U.K.'s health information...

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Adults Who Love Exercise May Gain 9 'Biological' Years

Posted 4 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 -- Could regular, strenuous exercise be a "fountain of youth"? New research suggests it could be -- for your cells, at least. "Just because you're 40 doesn't mean you're 40 years old biologically," said Larry Tucker, a professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University in Utah. "We all know people that seem younger than their actual age. The more physically active we are, the less biological aging takes place in our bodies," Tucker said in a university news...

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