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Daily MedNews

Short Bout of Exercise Might Boost Your Memory

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- Just a little bit of light exercise can immediately improve a person's memory, new Japanese research suggests. How little? The small study involved 36 healthy college-aged men and women and found that just 10 minutes of relaxed cycling on a stationary bike was all it took to improve recall during memory testing conducted right afterwards. Why? Brain scans on 16 of the... Read more

Gun Victims More Likely to Die Than Other Trauma Patients

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- Gunshot wounds are far deadlier than other types of trauma, according to a new study. Gunshot victims are five times more likely to need a blood transfusion. They also require 10 times more blood units than people involved in falls, car accidents, stabbings or other assaults, according to researchers from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. And they are 14 times... Read more

Coffee Shop Workers on Front Lines of Opioid Crisis

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- New research suggests that employees in coffee shops and fast food places can be trained to respond to opioid overdoses at their places of business. "Because opioid overdoses may occur in public bathrooms, business managers and staff unwittingly become first responders. Providing training to service industry employees on how to respond to an overdose and administer... Read more

Gender 'Nonconformity' Takes Mental Toll on Teens

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- American teens whose behavior, appearance or lifestyle do not conform to widely held views on what it is to be a "normal" male or female face a high risk for mental distress and drug abuse, new research warns. The findings were culled from a national survey exploring the psychological risk profiles of teens who described themselves as "gender nonconforming." The poll... Read more

Spinal Implant Could Be Breakthrough for Paralyzed Patients

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- A paraplegic man has regained the ability to move his legs and walk with assistance, thanks to an implanted electrode stimulating his spinal cord, Mayo Clinic researchers say. Surgeons implanted the electrode below the level of 29-year-old Jered Chinnock's spinal cord injury. A 2013 snowmobile crash left Chinnock with complete loss of motor control and sensation below... Read more

Booster Shots Safe for Most Kids Who Have Vaccine Reaction: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- Most children who have mild to moderate reactions to a vaccine can safely receive booster shots, new research suggests. Canadian scientists found there is a low rate of recurring reactions following subsequent vaccinations. They said their findings should help inform doctors and parents about the safety of immunizations. "Most patients with a history of mild or... Read more

Shorter People May Duck Risk of Varicose Veins

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- How tall you are might play a part in whether you are unlucky enough to develop varicose veins, a new study suggests. Every additional 4 inches in height increases your risk of varicose veins by about 25 percent, said researcher Dr. Erik Ingelsson, a professor of cardiovascular medicine with Stanford University School of Medicine. "We have pretty robust evidence that... Read more

Thinking of Others Makes Healthy Choices Easier

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- Reminding people to eat less or exercise usually gets their back up. That's one reason why public health messages fall on deaf ears, researchers say. But investigators think they've found a better way. They suggest leaving your ego behind because it might open your mind to healthy activities that your natural defensiveness shuns. "One of the things that gets in the way... Read more

More Needs to be Done to Keep Teen Drivers Safe, Pediatricians Say

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- Following years of decline, fatal car accidents involving teen drivers have accelerated in the United States, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians warns. New research also reveals that teenage drivers are more likely to be involved in a serious or deadly crash than any other age group, notes the American Academy of Pediatrics. The group has updated its 2006 policy... Read more

If Mom Smokes Pot, Kids May Try It Sooner

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- If Mom partakes of pot, her kids may be more likely to try it themselves at an earlier age. That's the contention of a new study, though it doesn't prove that one causes the other. Still, "early initiation is one of the strongest predictors of the likelihood of experiencing health consequences from marijuana use," said lead investigator Natasha Sokol, who's with Brown... Read more

Bells, Whistles and Home Exercise Equipment

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- Exercising on a budget can be as simple as buying a good pair of walking shoes. But when you want to make an investment in fitness equipment, new options can make your workouts interactive as well as high-energy. Look for exercise bikes, treadmills and ellipticals that offer pre-set workouts, often with incline adjustments and/or increases in tension, to challenge... Read more

Milk Straight From Breast Best for Baby's Weight

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 -- Breast milk from the bottle may not have as many benefits for a baby's weight as feeding straight from the breast, a new study suggests. The researchers found what many others have: Overall, breastfed babies tended to have a healthier weight than those who were formula-fed. However, babies given pumped breast milk did not benefit as much as those who fed from the... Read more

Health Highlights: Sept. 24, 2018

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Device Might Be 'Game Changer' for Patients With Severe Heart Failure A tiny clip may be a big advance for millions of Americans battling severe heart failure, new research announced on Sunday suggests. Researchers say a device, called a mitral clip, inserted into the heart greatly lowered... Read more

Health Tip: Maintain Healthy Cholesterol

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- If you have high cholesterol, you are at greater risk of developing a number of health problems, such as heart disease and stroke, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. High cholesterol often lacks symptoms, so cholesterol should be checked early in life, between ages 9 and 12, between ages 17 and 19, and at least every five years in adulthood. The CDC suggests how to... Read more

Health Tip: Make the Right Breakfast Choices

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Skipping breakfast should not be an option for kids, no matter how tired they are, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Regular meals help growing bodies and developing brains. The ideal breakfast should be a healthy balance of fruits and vegetables, proteins, grains and dairy. The FDA suggests how to make the most of your breakfast: Don't limit yourself to traditional breakfast... Read more

Don't Pop That Pimple, Expert Says

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, Sept. 23, 2018 -- It may be tempting to squeeze a large pimple, but doing so could make the zit worse, skin doctors say. Up to 50 million Americans struggle with various forms of acne, particularly red, swollen, painful bumps that develop deep in the skin, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. There are better, more effective ways to manage acne, said board-certified... Read more

5 Tips to Manage Your Child's Asthma

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, Sept. 22, 2018 -- For many children with asthma, coughing is an early warning sign of a flare-up, an expert says. Understanding asthma and knowing what to expect can help parents prevent or lessen the severity of asthma attacks, said Dr. Ronald Ferdman, a pediatric allergist-immunologist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles. He provided the following tips to help parents protect their... Read more

New Compounds Might Help Stop Spread of Malaria

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 -- Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes carrying malaria parasites, but scientists report they have discovered compounds that might keep mosquitoes from spreading the sometimes deadly disease. "Current anti-malarial drugs can cure a person of the disease, but that person is still infectious to mosquitoes, and can therefore still cause someone else to become infected,"... Read more

Parents Fret Over Fussy Eaters - but What Works?

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 -- The nightly dinner battles many parents have with picky toddlers can be exhausting. Now, research suggests that either pressuring or rewarding kids to eat healthier may backfire. "These practices can reinforce fussy eating, increase preferences for unhealthy foods, and lead to excessive weight gain," study author Holly Harris, from the Centre for Children's Health... Read more

Can Mouth Swab at Age 2 Predict Obesity?

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 -- Bacteria in a toddler's mouth might help predict later obesity, new research suggests. Scientists at Penn State University found the composition of microorganisms in the mouths of 2-year-olds offers clues to the child's future weight. "One in three children in the United States is overweight or obese," said the study's senior author, Kateryna Makova, a biology... Read more

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