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Daily MedNews

All That Social Media May Boost Loneliness, Not Banish It

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- For the billions of young people who seek community and connection on social media, new research warns their search may be in vain. Instead, spending too much time on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram may actually increase the risk of depression and loneliness. So concludes a small analysis that tracked the impact such sites had on the mental health of 143 users between... Read more

Tracking Preemies' Head Size May Yield IQ Clues

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- Head-size measurements can help screen for long-term IQ problems in very premature or very low birth weight babies, researchers say. "Measuring head circumference and thus head growth in early childhood is a proxy measure of brain volume growth in early childhood," said study senior author Dieter Wolke, of the University of Warwick in England. It's "simple and cheap to... Read more

Must Blood Pressure Rise Wth Age? Remote Tribes Hold Clues

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- Contrary to common belief, blood pressure doesn't have to rise as you age, a study of two remote South American tribes suggests. Looking at the isolated Yanomami tribe in the Venezuelan rainforest, researchers found their blood pressure remained low from youth to age 60. That's probably because as hunter-gatherer-gardeners, they don't eat the processed and salted foods... Read more

Teenage Obesity May Raise Pancreatic Cancer Risk Years Later

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- Obesity in the teen years may increase the risk of developing deadly pancreatic cancer in adulthood, researchers report. The odds for this rare cancer can quadruple due to obesity, the Israeli research team found. Moreover, the risk rises as weight increases, even affecting men in the high normal weight range. "It's been known for some time that obesity can increase... Read more

Selecting the Right Style of Yoga for You

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- Yoga has many benefits, from increasing flexibility to reducing stress. The practice offers so much because of its multi-dimensional nature. In addition to its fluid exercises, called asanas or poses, it focuses on correct breathing, posture and meditation with a philosophy that strives for a balance of body, mind and spirit. There are many styles of yoga offered in... Read more

Health Highlights: Nov. 14, 2018

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Primary Care Doctors Should Screen Adult Patients for Unhealthy Drinking: Task Force Primary care doctors should screen all adult patients for unhealthy drinking habits, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says in new statement. It also said doctors should provide brief counseling for... Read more

America Is Worried About Antibiotic Resistance

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- A majority of Americans believe the health threat posed by antibiotic resistance is real and pressing, a new survey shows. The survey of more than 1,000 adults found that 65 percent believe antibiotic resistance is a public health problem, and 81 percent are worried that antibiotic resistance will make more infections difficult to treat or even deadly. The survey was... Read more

Kids Get Caught in Deadly Cross-Fire of Domestic Violence

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14, 2018 -- Twenty percent of homicides of U.S. children ages 2 to 14 years are related to intimate partner violence, a new study indicates. That's double the rate in the National Violent Death Reporting System, according to Harvard School of Public Health researchers. For the study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 1,400 children in 16 states who were homicide victims... Read more

Health Tip: Long-Term Anxiety Can Affect Learning

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- A young child who has chronic anxiety may have trouble learning, Harvard University researchers say. Fears of the dark, monsters or strangers are common and are considered normal and usually temporary. But when fears extend to physical, sexual or emotional abuse, they can affect a child's developing brain, the researchers noted. The school's Center on the Developing Child examined animal... Read more

Health Tip: Manage Morning Sickness

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Many women have nausea during the first trimester of pregnancy, sometimes called morning sickness. Symptoms tend to ease as the pregnancy progresses. The American Pregnancy Association suggests how to help manage morning sickness: Eat non-spicy foods rich in vitamin B6, including wholegrain wheat and other cereals, seeds and nuts, fruits such as bananas or papayas, fish and lean meats. In... Read more

Two Factors at Birth Can Boost a Child's Obesity Risk

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Kids who were born large and whose mothers developed a form of diabetes during pregnancy have nearly triple the odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood, new research shows. "Just like smoking, alcohol consumption and other lifestyle choices, [women's] weight prior to getting pregnant, and weight gain and blood sugar control during pregnancy may have a... Read more

Under Pressure, Juul Withdraws Most Flavored E-Cigs From Market

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Juul Labs, which commands 70 percent of the U.S. e-cigarette market, announced Tuesday that it would cease selling most flavored versions of its popular vaping pods in retail stores. The company said it would also terminate its social media productions related to the flavored products. The announcement comes after increasing pressure from the U.S. Food and Drug... Read more

Red Cross Issues Urgent Call for Blood Ahead of the Holidays

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- There's an urgent need for blood and platelet donations in the United States because donations during September and October fell 21,000 units short of hospital needs, the American Red Cross says. That means blood products are being distributed to hospitals faster than donations are being made. "Today, the Red Cross asks the American public for help. As we head into the... Read more

CDC Probe Continues as Cases of Polio-Like Illness Rise in Kids

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Cases of a mysterious polio-like illness continue to mount in the United States, and health officials are scrambling to figure out the cause. There are now 252 patients under investigation for acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), an increase of 33 patients since last week, said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at... Read more

Baby Boom or Baby Bust? What Nation-by-Nation Population Trends Reveal

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Birth rates are booming in 104 countries, but declining in 91 others, a new research reveals. The world's population has risen 197 percent since 1950, from 2.6 billion to 7.6 billion in 2017. Between 2007 and 2017, it grew by 87.2 million people a year, compared with 81.5 million a year from 1997 to 2007. In 1950, wealthy countries accounted for 24 percent of the... Read more

How Your Mother's Love Life May Affect Your Own

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Like mother, like child? Your mother's romantic history may influence how many partners you have, a new study claims. "Our results suggest that mothers may have certain characteristics that make them more or less desirable on the marriage market, and better or worse at relationships," said study lead author Claire Kamp Dush, an associate professor of human sciences and... Read more

AHA: PTSD Common Among Those Who Suffer Tear in the Aorta's Wall

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The sharp and sudden pain from an aortic dissection, along with the emergency treatment that follows, can lead to post-traumatic stress disorder years later, a new study finds. An aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition in which a tear in the wall of the aorta -- the major artery carrying blood out of the heart -- allows blood to... Read more

Murder of Family, Friends Takes Highest Toll on Black Teens

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Teens who lose a family member or friend to murder have an increased risk of suicide, and black teens are most likely to face this kind of heartbreak, a new study finds. University of Pittsburgh researchers analyzed the results of a 2014 survey of just over 1,600 teens, aged 14 to 19, in Allegheny County and found that 13 percent said a friend or family member had been... Read more

Exercise Makes Even the 'Still Overweight' Healthier: Study

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- Heavyset folks who exercise regularly shouldn't get discouraged if they can't seem to shed more weight, no matter how hard they try. A new study suggests that their regular workouts are still contributing to better overall heart health, making them "fat but fit" and helping them live longer. People who are obese-but-fit have lower resting pulse rates, less body fat,... Read more

Heart Failure Patients Shouldn't Stop Meds Even if Condition Improves: Study

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, Nov. 13, 2018 -- There's bad news for heart failure patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who'd like to stop taking their meds. Any progress they've seen on medication is likely to fade once they stop taking their heart drugs, new clinical trial results show. About 40 percent of a small group of patients wound up back on their medications after their heart function faltered, said lead... Read more

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