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Daily MedNews

Babies Start Connecting Words Early On

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Babies apparently have a better understanding of adults' language than you might think. New research reveals that they can identify the meanings of some words and even recognize that some words are more connected to certain words than to others. The finding is based on an analysis that used eye-tracking software to see how approximately 40 babies reacted when certain words -- and word pairs -- were uttered in their presence. "Even though there aren't many overt signals...

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How to Spot an Eating Disorder

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Eating disorders are common in the United States. But they're hard to identify and tough to fix. "Eating disorders are serious conditions that ... negatively impact your health, emotions and ability to function in important areas of life," said Dr. Asim Shah. Moreover, "more people die of an eating disorder than of any other psychiatric disorder," Shah added. He is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. It's...

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Severe Psoriasis May Make Diabetes Increasingly Likely

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- People with the skin disease psoriasis are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, and the more severe the psoriasis, the greater their risk, a new study finds. Researchers examined data on nearly 85,000 adults in the United Kingdom, including 8,100 who had psoriasis. Compared with people who did not have psoriasis, the risk for diabetes was 21 percent higher among those with psoriasis on 2 percent or less of their body. It was 64 percent higher among those with...

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When Treating Infertility, Vitamin D Levels May Be Key

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Women with low vitamin D levels may be less likely to have a baby after assisted reproductive technology (ART) than those with normal vitamin D levels, a new study suggests. The finding stemmed from a review of 11 published studies that involved a total of 2,700 women who were undergoing ART, which includes in vitro fertilization and frozen embryo transfer to achieve pregnancy. The British researchers found that women with correct levels of vitamin D were 34 percent...

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Diabetes, High Blood Pressure While Pregnant Spells Trouble Later On

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- If you develop both diabetes and high blood pressure during pregnancy, you face a much higher risk of future trouble than women who only develop one of those conditions while pregnant, researchers report. And that future trouble can include heart disease, the Canadian researchers added. To reach that conclusion, the research team looked at 64,000 couples in the province of Quebec. Having either diabetes or high blood pressure during pregnancy increased a woman's...

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Quickly Treating Mini-Stroke Can Cut Risk for Future Stroke

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Prompt treatment of a mini-stroke could reduce the likelihood of having a full-blown stroke by roughly 80 percent, according to a new report. People who have a mini-stroke -- officially called a transient ischemic attack (TIA) -- typically recover from symptoms, such as trouble speaking or paralysis, within minutes. But a trio of neurologists from Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., warn that these seemingly fleeting events are often followed by a more...

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Cancer Survivors Can Develop PTSD, Too

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- People usually imagine post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as happening to war veterans or assault victims. But new research shows the trauma of a cancer scare often leaves survivors with the condition. Many may not want to admit how they feel, the study's lead author said. "Many cancer patients believe they need to adopt a 'warrior mentality,' and remain positive and optimistic from diagnosis through treatment to stand a better chance of beating their cancer,"...

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Family Vacations That Are Fun for All

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Taking a family vacation is a great way to have quality time, but going on a trip that each family member will enjoy takes some planning. Consider choices for an activity-oriented trip. Besides health benefits, vacations make great memories when everyone participates. Start by getting the whole family involved. Show photos of possible destinations to younger kids and let older ones offer their opinions on where to go. For a beach holiday, look for a resort that also...

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Teens' Painkiller Misuse Linked to Dating Violence

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Teens who abuse prescription drugs, like opioid painkillers, are prone to initiating or being victims of dating violence, a new study finds. In a nationwide survey of more than 10,000 teenagers who had dated in the past year, the researchers found that non-medical use of prescription drugs by boys was associated with sexual dating violence. And non-medical use of prescription drugs by girls was linked more often with physical dating violence, according to the study's...

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Motorcycle Crashes Far More Deadly Than Car Crashes

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Motorcycle crashes are far costlier than car accidents, both in lives lost and in medical expenses, a new study shows. Canadian researchers found that the death rate from motorcycle crashes was five times greater than from car crashes, and the rate of severe injury was 10 times greater. That came with a six times greater cost to the health care system. Though the findings stem from an analysis of traffic accidents in the Canadian province of Ontario, the researchers...

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Heavier Women May Need Mammograms More Often

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Women who are overweight or obese may need to be screened for breast cancer more frequently, new Swedish research suggests. The reason? Overweight or obese women are at greater risk of having breast cancer detected after the tumor has grown large -- over 2 centimeters -- than their slimmer counterparts, the study found. Heavier women also have a worse prognosis when their breast cancers are detected between regular cancer screenings (known as interval cancers) than...

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Most U.S. Parents Can't Find Good Childcare: Survey

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Two-thirds of U.S. parents with young children say it's difficult to find a childcare or preschool facility that meets their health and safety standards, new survey results show. Researchers questioned more than 300 parents nationwide who had at least one child aged 1 to 5 years. Sixty-two percent said they had trouble finding facilities that met all of their standards, according to the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's...

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Health Highlights: Nov. 20, 2017

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Opioid Epidemic Cost the U.S. Half a Trillion in 2015: Report The true cost of the U.S. opioid epidemic in 2015 was $504 billion, which is six times higher than the most recent estimate, according to the White House Council of Economic Advisers. A 2016 study found that prescription opioid overdoes, abuse and dependence in 2013 cost the nation $78.5 billion in areas such as health care,...

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Health Tip: How Much Exercise Do You Need?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- We all know that exercise is good for us, but how much do we need at each stage of life? The U.S. Library of Medicine suggests: Adults should get 30 minutes of aerobic activity each day -- in the form of walking, running, biking or swimming. Additionally, they should practice strengthening exercises -- such as lifting weights or climbing stairs -- twice weekly. Children and teens should get 60 minutes of age-appropriate physical activity each day, such as playing at the playground or...

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Health Tip: Infant Medication Advice For New Moms

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- A new mom has enough stress on her hands without worrying about giving medication to her newborn. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests: Get your doctor's advice before giving medication to your baby. Store any medication out of your infant's reach. Use a dosage device such as an oral syringe to ensure that baby gets the correct dose. If you are nursing and take medication yourself, make sure it is ok to breast-feed.

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Shaming Overweight Kids Only Makes Things Worse

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 -- Overweight kids who are shamed or stigmatized are more likely to binge eat or isolate themselves than to make positive changes such as losing weight, a leading pediatricians' group says. In a new policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers guidance to help parents, teachers, school officials and pediatricians assist overweight and obese children without making them feel bad about themselves. "We see a growing problem regarding weight stigma. In a...

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How to Spot Respiratory Syncytial Virus That Puts Some Babies in the Hospital

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, Nov. 19, 2017 -- Is your baby's stuffy nose and cough just a cold or something more serious? It could be respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the leading cause of infant hospitalization in the United States, experts say. RSV causes symptoms similar to those of other viruses, including stuffy or runny nose, fever, coughing, sneezing, loss of appetite and irritability. For most little ones, RSV isn't serious. But it is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children...

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What It Takes to Get Teens Moving

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, Nov. 18, 2017 -- Teens with friends are active teens, a new study suggests. "You can build beautiful parks and facilities; but if children don't have friends to play with, these facilities won't be enough to increase their physical activity," said study lead author Sarah-Jeanne Salvy. "Peers and friends are the catalyst of the physical environment," Salvy added. She is an associate professor in the division of preventive medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. For the...

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More Patients Are Having a Say in Their Medical Care

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 -- U.S. doctors and patients are making more decisions together, which looks like a win-win for both, researchers say. A new analysis of national survey data found that shared decision-making between doctors and patients rose 14 percent between 2002 and 2014. Patients said doctors have become more likely to: ask them to help make medical decisions; listen to them carefully; show respect for what they said; spend enough time with them; and provide easy-to-understand...

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Gulf War Illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Are Distinct Disorders: Study

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 -- The diagnosis and treatment of two conditions -- chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War illness -- could improve thanks to the discovery of distinct brain chemistry signatures in people with these disorders, researchers say. The illnesses share symptoms such as pain, fatigue, thinking problems and exhaustion after exercise. They're often misdiagnosed as depression or other mental health problems, according to the study team from Georgetown University Medical Center in...

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