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Drug interactions between Benadryl and doxylamine

Results for the following 2 drugs:
Benadryl (diphenhydramine)
doxylamine

Interactions between your selected drugs

Moderate

diphenhydramine ↔ doxylamine

Applies to:Benadryl (diphenhydramine) and doxylamine

MONITOR: Agents with anticholinergic properties (e.g., sedating antihistamines; antispasmodics; neuroleptics; phenothiazines; skeletal muscle relaxants; tricyclic antidepressants; disopyramide) may have additive effects when used in combination. Excessive parasympatholytic effects may result in paralytic ileus, hyperthermia, heat stroke, and the anticholinergic intoxication syndrome. Peripheral symptoms of intoxication commonly include mydriasis, blurred vision, flushed face, fever, dry skin and mucous membranes, tachycardia, urinary retention, and constipation. Central symptoms may include memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, hallucinations, psychosis, delirium, hyperactivity, twitching or jerking movements, stereotypy, and seizures. Central nervous system-depressant effects may also be additively or synergistically increased when these agents are combined, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. Use of neuroleptics in combination with other neuroleptics or anticholinergic agents may increase the risk of tardive dyskinesia. In addition, some neuroleptics and tricyclic antidepressants may cause prolongation of the QT interval and theoretically, concurrent use of two or more drugs that can cause QT interval prolongation may result in additive effects and increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias including torsade de pointes and sudden death.

MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised when agents with anticholinergic properties are combined, particularly in the elderly and those with underlying organic brain disease, who tend to be more sensitive to the central anticholinergic effects of these drugs and in whom toxicity symptoms may be easily overlooked. Patients should be advised to notify their physician promptly if they experience potential symptoms of anticholinergic intoxication such as abdominal pain, fever, heat intolerance, blurred vision, confusion, and/or hallucinations. Ambulatory patients should be counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. A reduction in anticholinergic dosages may be necessary if excessive adverse effects develop.

References

  1. Kulik AV, Wilbur R "Delirium and stereotypy from anticholinergic antiparkinson drugs." Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 6 (1982): 75-82
  2. Hvizdos AJ, Bennett JA, Wells BG, Rappaport KB, Mendel SA "Anticholinergic psychosis in a patient receiving usual doses of haloperidol." Clin Pharm 2 (1983): 174-8
  3. Mann SC, Boger WP "Psychotropic drugs, summer heat and humidity, and hyperplexia: a danger restated." Am J Psychiatry 135 (1978): 1097-100
View all 15 references

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Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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