Skip to Content

Smallpox Vaccine Dosage

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Geriatric Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Smallpox Prophylaxis

1 drop applied by percutaneous multiple puncture technique (scarification).

Usual Geriatric Dose for Smallpox Prophylaxis

1 drop applied by percutaneous multiple puncture technique (scarification).

Routine nonemergency vaccination is not recommended for geriatric individuals. There are no absolute contraindications to vaccinations in persons with a high-risk exposure or during an outbreak emergency.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Smallpox Prophylaxis

1 drop applied by percutaneous multiple puncture technique (scarification).

less than 12 months: Routine nonemergency vaccination is contraindicated.
1 year to 18 years: Routine nonemergency vaccination is not recommended.

There are no absolute contraindications to vaccinations in persons with a high-risk exposure or during an outbreak emergency.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Routine nonemergency vaccination is contraindicated in individuals with eczema or a past history of eczema; individuals whose household contacts have eczema or other acute, chronic or exfoliative skin conditions; persons receiving immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids, radiation or immunosuppressive drugs; immunodeficient individuals (including HIV); immunosuppressed persons; and pregnant women. Vaccination is also contraindicated in household contacts of these individuals.

Routine nonemergency vaccination is contraindicated in infants less than 12 months, individuals with eczema or a past history of eczema; individuals whose household contacts have eczema or other acute, chronic or exfoliative skin conditions; persons receiving immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids, radiation or immunosuppressive drugs; immunodeficient individuals (including HIV); immunosuppressed persons; and pregnant women. Vaccination is also contraindicated in household contacts of these individuals.

Nonemergency vaccination is not recommended in children less than 18 years or in geriatric individuals.

Routine vaccination should be deferred in individuals with a history of heart disease (including prior myocardial infarction, angina, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, stroke, transient ischemic attack, chest pain or exercise induced shortness of breath).

Routine vaccination should also be deferred in individuals with at least three of the following risk factors: cigarette smoker, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and/or a first-degree relative with onset of heart disease before the age of 50.

There are no absolute contraindications to the vaccination of any individual with a high-risk exposure or during an outbreak emergency. If the person has a relative contraindication, the risk for serious vaccine complications should be weighed against the risk of a potentially fatal smallpox infection.

The natural rubber stopper in the vial may cause allergic reactions if handled by or administered to persons with a latex allergy.

After vaccination is completed, any vaccine remaining on the skin should be blotted off with clean, dry gauze or cotton.

The vial, stopper, needle to release the vacuum, diluent syringes, vented needle for reconstitution, bifurcated needle for administration, and any gauze or cotton coming into contact with the vaccine should be disposed of as biohazardous waste.

Susceptible individuals (with eczema, immunodeficiency or immunosuppression, including HIV) should be identified and measures taken to avoid contact with persons who have active vaccination lesions.

Contact spread of vaccinia from recently vaccinated persons has been reported. Vaccinia virus is present at the vaccination site from the time of papule development (2 to 5 days after vaccination) until scab separation from the skin lesion (14 to 21 days after vaccination). During this time, measures should be taken to prevent the spread of the virus to another person or another part of the body.

The vaccination site may be left uncovered or covered with a porous bandage such as gauze, until the scab has fallen off and the skin has healed. An occlusive bandage should not be used routinely. Bandages should be changed every 1 to 2 days to prevent maceration of the vaccination site due fluid accumulation. Topical creams or ointments should not be applied to the vaccination site. Contaminated bandages should be put in sealed plastic bags before disposal in the trash. Clothing or other cloth materials may be decontaminated by laundering in hot water with bleach. The vaccination site should be kept dry, although normal bathing may continue.

Recently vaccinated healthcare personnel should avoid contact with patients, especially immunodeficient patients, until the scab has fallen off. However, if contact is unavoidable, the vaccination site should be well covered and good handwashing technique should be practiced. A more occlusive dressing such as semipermeable polyurethane (e.g., Opsite(R)) is an effective barrier. Care should be taken to prevent viral contamination from the accumulated exudate when the dressing is removed. Fluid accumulation beneath the dressing may increase the maceration of the vaccination site. Accumulation may be decreased by covering the vaccination with dry gauze, than applying the dressing over the gauze. The dressing should be changed at least daily.

Thorough hand washing is vital to preventing inadvertent autoinoculation and contact transmission.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

If a major (primary) reaction is not observed within 6 to 8 days, the individual should be revaccinated with vaccine from a different vial or lot.

Hide