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Typhoid Vaccine

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

What is the typhoid vaccine?

The typhoid vaccine is given to prevent typhoid infection. Typhoid (also called typhoid fever) is a disease caused by bacteria. It is usually spread through food or water contaminated with bowel movement from an infected person. It can also spread through close contact with an infected person. The typhoid vaccine is not given routinely. It is given to people who are traveling to a country where typhoid is active. Your healthcare provider can tell you if you will be at risk for typhoid where you are traveling.

Who should get the typhoid vaccine?

  • Anyone traveling to a country where typhoid is active
  • Anyone who has close contact with a person who has typhoid
  • Lab workers who handle the bacteria that cause typhoid

When is the vaccine given?

The vaccine comes in 2 forms. The first contains inactivated (killed) cells and is given as an injection. The other contains live, weakened bacteria cells and is given as a liquid you swallow.

  • The inactivated vaccine is given in 1 injection. Get the vaccine at least 2 weeks before you travel. This will give the vaccine time to work. You may need booster shots every 2 years if you are still at high risk for typhoid.
  • The live vaccine is given in 4 doses. You will drink 1 dose every other day. Take the last dose at least 1 week before you travel. This will give the vaccine time to work. You may need booster doses every 5 years if you are still at high risk for typhoid.

Who should not get the injection?

  • Children younger than 2 years
  • Anyone who has had a severe reaction to a previous dose should not get another dose
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine

Who should not get the oral vaccine?

  • Children younger than 6 years
  • Anyone who has had a severe reaction to a previous dose should not get another dose
  • Anyone who has a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine
  • Anyone with a weak immune system, such as from HIV/AIDS, steroids, or cancer

Who should wait to get the vaccine?

If you are sick, wait to get the vaccine until you feel better. Tell your healthcare provider if you are vomiting or have diarrhea. Tell your healthcare provider if you are taking antibiotics. You may need to wait to get the vaccine until at least 3 days after you stop taking the antibiotics.

What are the risks of the typhoid vaccine?

If you got the injection, the area where the vaccine was given may be red, tender, or swollen. You may still get typhoid, even after a typhoid vaccine. You may have an allergic reaction to the vaccine. This can be life-threatening. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.

Call 911 for any of the following:

  • Your mouth and throat are swollen.
  • You are wheezing or have trouble breathing.
  • You have chest pain or your heart is beating faster than usual.
  • You feel like you are going to faint.

When should I seek immediate care?

  • Your face is red or swollen.
  • You have hives that spread over your body.
  • You feel weak or dizzy.

When should I contact my healthcare provider?

  • You have increased pain, redness, or swelling around the area where the shot was given.
  • You have questions or concerns about the typhoid vaccine.

Care Agreement

You have the right to help plan your care. Learn about your health condition and how it may be treated. Discuss treatment options with your caregivers to decide what care you want to receive. You always have the right to refuse treatment. The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

© 2015 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

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