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Laparoscopic Cystectomy With Ileal Conduit

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

What is a laparoscopic cystectomy with ileal conduit?

Laparoscopic cystectomy with ileal conduit is surgery to remove your bladder. Your surgeon will use a scope inserted through small incisions on your abdomen to do the surgery. He will use a small section of your intestines to create a urostomy (ileal conduit). This will allow urine to drain from your kidneys through an opening on your abdomen and out of your body. The opening, called a stoma, will be connected to a bag that collects urine.

How do I prepare for surgery?

Your healthcare provider will talk to you about how to prepare for surgery. He may tell you not to eat or drink anything after midnight on the day of your surgery. He will tell you what medicines to take or not take on the day of your surgery.

What will happen during surgery?

  • Your surgeon will insert a scope through small incisions in your abdomen. He will insert tools through the scope to perform your surgery. He will remove your bladder and may remove nearby tissue or organs. In men, the organs include the prostate and seminal vesicles (glands near the prostate). In women, the organs include the uterus, cervix, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. Your surgeon may also remove part of the urethra and lymph nodes near your bladder.
  • Your surgeon will then remove part of your intestine. He will use this to connect your ureters to an opening in your abdomen. Two small stents (tubes) will be placed inside the ureters to help urine drain while you heal. Your surgeon will close your incision with stitches or staples.

What are the risks of surgery?

Your surgeon may need to switch to an open surgery and make a larger incision on your abdomen. Surgery may increase your risk for bleeding or infection. The stoma may become swollen or painful. Part of your intestine may bulge into the area around the stoma. Urine may leak where the ureters are connected to the section of intestine. You may get a kidney stone. Your ureters may become blocked and not empty urine. Your intestines may also stop working, and it may become difficult to have a bowel movement. You may get a blood clot in your leg or arm. The above conditions may become life-threatening.

Care Agreement

You have the right to help plan your care. Learn about your health condition and how it may be treated. Discuss treatment options with your caregivers to decide what care you want to receive. You always have the right to refuse treatment. The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

© 2015 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

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