Skip to Content

Join the 'Seizure Prevention' group to help and get support from people like you.

Seizure Prevention News

Autism Greatly Boosts Kids' Injury Risk, Especially for Drowning

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – Children with autism are at extremely high risk of drowning compared to other kids, a new study reveals. Analysis of death records found that kids with an autism spectrum disorder are 160 times more likely to die from drowning compared with the general pediatric population, the researchers reported. Children diagnosed with autism – usually between 2 and 3 years of age – need swimming lessons as soon as possible, even before they start other therapies that will improve the long-term quality of their lives, said senior author Dr. Guohua Li. "Pediatricians and parents should immediately help enroll the child in swimming classes, before any behavioral therapy, speech therapy or occupational therapy," said Li. He is a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City. "Swimming ability for kids with autism is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Schizophrenia, Autism, Seizure Prevention, Asperger Syndrome, Seizure Prophylaxis

'Synthetic Pot' Tied to Risky Sex, Violence and Drug Abuse in Teens

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 – Marijuana is often seen as a relatively benign drug that produces a typically mellow high, but new U.S. government research shows that the drugs called synthetic pot appear to be much different. Teens who use synthetic pot are at a heightened risk for violent behavior, risky sex and abuse of other drugs, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study revealed. Synthetic pot – sometimes called fake weed – covers a variety of drugs sold under hundreds of brand names. Spice and K2 were common brands in the past. Some of the chemicals in fake weed are similar to those in marijuana. These drugs are often marketed as natural and safe. But, they have unpredictable, and in some cases, life-threatening effects, according to the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). And, they have become popular among teens because they are cheap and readily ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Contraception, Panic Disorder, Emergency Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Seizures, Opiate Dependence, Smoking, Paranoid Disorder, Drug Dependence, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Postcoital Contraception, Agitation, Seizure Prevention, Psychosis, Agitated State, Substance Abuse, Cannabis, Seizure Prophylaxis

Severe Low Blood Sugar Episode May Up Death Risk in Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 10, 2017 – Just one episode of dangerously low blood sugar might increase the risk of death, heart disease and stroke in people with type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. The low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) episode had to be so serious that it required a visit to the emergency room, according to researchers from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. "If you have a patient with a history of severe hypoglycemia, this could portend poorly for his or her future," said study co-author Alexandra Lee, a Ph.D. candidate in epidemiology. "Our thinking has been that you resolve a hypoglycemic episode and it's over. But what this tells us is that one episode may have long-lasting consequences," Lee said in a school news release. However, the researchers also noted that it's not clear from this study whether people who had a severe low blood sugar episode were ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Seizure Prevention, Hypoglycemia, Insulin Resistance, Transient Ischemic Attack, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Seizure Prophylaxis, Diabetic Coma (in DM Type II)

Can Brain Scans Help Doctors Navigate Epilepsy Surgery?

Posted 11 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – MRI scans might help doctors protect critical areas of the brain before surgery to treat epilepsy, new guidelines suggest. Scientists found the scans may be a safer and less invasive alternative to another more commonly used procedure, according to the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). When medication doesn't effectively control epilepsy, surgery may be recommended. Doctors can remove the part of the brain that triggers seizures or use certain procedures to control seizure activity. Before surgery, however, the brain must be "mapped" to ensure the regions responsible for language and memory aren't damaged during the procedure, the study authors explained. This can be done in one of the following ways, the AAN says: Functional MRI (fMRI): This brain imaging procedure measures blood flow, to detect brain activity. The Wada test: This invasive procedure, ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis, Neurosurgery, Head Imaging

US Families Spend 1.5 Billion Hours Yearly on Kids With Special Health Needs

Posted 27 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 – Families in the United States spend 1.5 billion hours each year providing home health care to their chronically ill or disabled children, a new study shows. The hours of health care these parents and other family members provide would cost $36 billion if performed by home health workers who received the going rate – or $12 billion if unskilled workers receiving minimum wage were hired, said senior researcher Dr. Mark Schuster. Parents of chronically ill children are asked these days to provide "the kind of care that, if they weren't there, the system would have to provide home health care or keep the children in the hospital longer," said Schuster, chief of general pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital. He's also a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. These time-consuming and sometimes technical health care tasks can include maintaining ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Head Injury, Seizure Prevention, Muscular Dystrophy, Cystic Fibrosis, Cerebral Palsy, Seizure Prophylaxis, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness, Cystic Fibrosis with Ileus, Myotonia Congenita

'Epilepsy Gene Network' Identified in Brain

Posted 14 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 – Scientists say they have identified a gene network in the brain that's associated with epilepsy. Although the research is in the early stages, the investigators hope their discovery can revive interest in finding new epilepsy treatments. "Identifying groups of genes that work together, and then targeting these networks of genes, may lead to more effective treatments," said study senior author Michael Johnson. He's a professor of medicine at Imperial College London in England. "Our proof-of-concept study suggests this network biology approach could help us identify new medications for epilepsy, and the methods can also be applied to other diseases," Johnson said in a college news release. The newly discovered "epilepsy network" includes 320 genes believed to be involved in how brain cells communicate with one another. When the network malfunctions, it triggers ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis, Diagnosis and Investigation, West Syndrome, Status Epilepticus, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, Head Imaging

Rare Infant Seizure Disorder Often Missed

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – Many infants with a rare form of epilepsy known as infantile spasms aren't promptly diagnosed, and that delay can lead to devastating health consequences, new research indicates. The peculiar clusters of seizures usually strike between 4 and 12 months of age, said study researcher Dr. Shaun Hussain. He is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Los Angeles. "It is completely different from other types of seizures," Hussain said. They last about a second. Typically, the child drops his head and jerks his arms up. Parents may not notice or might think it's nothing to worry about, the researcher said. But untreated, "infantile spasms lead to terrible outcomes," said Hussain, who's also director of the UCLA Infantile Spasms Project. These outcomes can include autism, lifelong epilepsy or mental retardation, he said. Even a delay of a ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis, Diagnosis and Investigation

Marijuana Derivative May Curb Tough-to-Treat Epilepsy

Posted 6 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 – A purified oral version of a marijuana compound may help with treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy, two new clinical trials show. The researchers found that the compound, cannabidiol (CBD), helped reduce seizure frequency in children and adults with two hard-to-treat forms of epilepsy: Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. The drug is still experimental, and doctors stressed that it did not help everyone and is not a "cure." On the other hand, they called the results "very encouraging," given how difficult it is to manage the seizure disorders. "It's always a good day when we have a potential new option to offer these patients," said Dr. Amy Brooks-Kayal, a pediatric neurologist at Children's Hospital Colorado who was not involved in the research. She had another caveat, however: The CBD used in the trials is a "purified, pharmaceutical-grade" pill. ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Cannabis, Seizure Prophylaxis, Status Epilepticus, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

When Sibling Has Epilepsy, Kids Worry

Posted 5 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 – Brothers and sisters of children with epilepsy tend to worry and feel protective toward them, a new study finds. "When a child has a chronic disease, it impacts the family and we wanted to learn how it affects siblings of children with epilepsy," said lead researcher Barbara Kroner. She's a senior epidemiologist at RTI International, a nonprofit research institute headquartered in North Carolina. "We found very few disapproving feelings among siblings toward their brothers and sisters with epilepsy. The negative feelings they had were more internal, showing they were sad for or worried about them," she explained in a news release from the American Epilepsy Society. For the study, researchers surveyed 61 parents of a child with epilepsy. They asked about the disorder's effect on the sibling closest in age, who had to be at least 4 years old. The study found that ... Read more

Related support groups: Klonopin, Seizures, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Lorazepam, Epilepsy, Diazepam, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis, Klonopin Wafer, Onfi, West Syndrome, Clobazam, Diastat, Valrelease, Diastat AcuDial, Dizac, Lorazepam Intensol, Diazepam Intensol

Study Sheds Light on Safety of Driving With Epilepsy

Posted 5 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Dec. 4, 2016 – People with epilepsy who experienced longer seizures during a simulated driving test may face an increased risk for crashes while on the road, a new study suggests. About 75 percent of people with epilepsy use medication to control their seizures and are able to drive. The remainder of patients typically keep a journal of seizures, noting how long they last, and doctors use that information to determine whether patients can drive safely, the study authors explained. The new study included 16 people with epilepsy who used a driving simulator for between one to 10 hours, most for an average of three to four hours. In total, the patients had 20 seizures, seven of which resulted in "crashes." The longer the seizure, the greater the chance of a "crash." Seizures lasted an average of 75 seconds among patients who crashed and 30 seconds among those who didn't crash. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Topamax, Epilepsy, Keppra, Tegretol, Topiramate, Dilantin, Qsymia, Carbamazepine, Seizure Prevention, Levetiracetam, Phenytoin, Tegretol XR, Valproic Acid, Epitol, Carbatrol, Seizure Prophylaxis, Keppra XR, Phentermine/topiramate, Depakene

11 Percent of Stroke Survivors Struggle With Epilepsy

Posted 4 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 – More than one in 10 stroke survivors develop epilepsy, and the greater the brain damage caused by stroke, the higher the risk of seizures, a new study reports. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition marked by recurrent, unprovoked seizures, muscle spasms or convulsions. Researchers analyzed data from 450 stroke survivors in the United Kingdom and found that 11 percent developed epilepsy after their stroke. The study found that those who developed epilepsy had twice the amount of brain damage as those who did not develop seizures. Those who developed epilepsy were an average of 44 years old, compared with an average age of 56 for those who did not develop epilepsy. But the study did not prove that more brain damage causes epilepsy risk to rise. Brain damage from stroke tends to be more extensive in younger people, putting them at higher risk for epilepsy, ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Ischemic Stroke, Seizure Prevention, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Seizure Prophylaxis, Status Epilepticus

Health Tip: Create a Safer Home for Kids With Seizures

Posted 24 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If your child has epilepsy, you can take steps to reduce the risk of a seizure leading to injury. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests: Securing padding to any object with sharp corners, such as a table or countertop. Avoiding glass tables. Getting your child a bed that is low to the floor. Making sure carpeting is non-slip, and not using throw rugs. Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis

Moms' Rheumatoid Arthritis May Be Linked to Epilepsy Risk in Kids

Posted 16 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 – Some children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have higher-than-average odds of developing epilepsy, a new study suggests. Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis were one-third more likely to develop epilepsy by age 4 than other children. The risk of epilepsy later in childhood was one-quarter higher for those born to moms with rheumatoid arthritis, the study found. But, experts stressed that the findings don't prove that a mother's rheumatoid arthritis causes epilepsy. So far, only an association has been found. And even if children of women with rheumatoid arthritis have a higher epilepsy risk than other kids do, the odds are still low. In the study of nearly 2 million children, the vast majority of those born to moms with rheumatoid arthritis did not develop epilepsy, said lead researcher Ane Lilleore Rom, of Copenhagen University ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Seizure Prophylaxis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Diagnosis and Investigation, Still's Disease, Rheumatoid Lung, Felty's Syndrome

Newer Epilepsy Drugs May Be Safer During Pregnancy

Posted 1 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 – Women who take the new epilepsy drugs levetiracetam and topiramate during pregnancy don't run the risk of harming their infant's mental development, British researchers report. But the commonly prescribed anti-seizure drug valproate was linked with lower IQs in children, especially when taken at higher doses, researchers say. "The treatment of epilepsy in women who are considering a pregnancy or are pregnant involves optimizing the health of the mother as well as keeping the risk to the fetus as low as possible," said lead researcher Rebecca Bromley, a research fellow at the Institute for Human Development at the University of Manchester. In the study, children exposed to levetiracetam (Keppra) or topiramate (Topamax) in the womb did not differ from children not exposed to these drugs. And they had better outcomes than the children exposed to valproate ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Emergency Contraception, Seizures, Topamax, Epilepsy, Keppra, Topiramate, Qsymia, Postcoital Contraception, Seizure Prevention, Levetiracetam, Seizure Prophylaxis, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Keppra XR, Phentermine/topiramate, West Syndrome, Status Epilepticus, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, Trokendi XR

Young People With Epilepsy Struggle on Many Fronts

Posted 10 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10, 2016 – Children and young adults with epilepsy face an array of psychological, physical and social challenges, a new analysis reveals. Australian researchers reviewed 43 studies that included a total of more than 950 children, teens and young adults, and delved into their experiences with the seizure disorder. "Children with epilepsy feel vulnerable from a physical and a social perspective," said study author Deepak Gill. He is a pediatric neurologist who heads the Children's Comprehensive Epilepsy Service at the Children's Hospital of Westmead, in New South Wales. "One theme that came out was the loss of bodily control, and that the person during a seizure can feel physically overpowered, with worry that the seizures would lead to serious injury," Gill added. Those with epilepsy also reported feeling inferior and discriminated against. Some of the comments from the ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis, West Syndrome, Status Epilepticus, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Page 1 2 3 4 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Seizures

Related Drug Support Groups

Klonopin, clonazepam, Valium, Lamictal, Topamax, diazepam, lamotrigine, topiramate, Diamox, view more... Epsom Salt, Lamictal XR, Tranxene, valproic acid, acetazolamide, magnesium sulfate, clorazepate, Klonopin Wafer, Mebaral, Depakene, Diamox Sequels, Trokendi XR, Stavzor, Tranxene T-Tab, Diastat, Topamax Sprinkle, mephobarbital, Lamictal CD, Sabril, vigabatrin, Lamictal ODT, Qudexy XR, Diastat AcuDial, Valrelease, Tranxene-SD, Depacon, Topiragen, ethotoin, Sulfamag, Diazepam Intensol, Dizac, Zetran, Diastat Pediatric, Peganone