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Gastrointestinal Disorders News

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Human Gut Germs Dictated by Diet

Posted 25 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 25, 2017 – What you eat, or don't eat, affects the mix of germs in your digestive tract, new research indicates. Thousands of microbial species thrive in the human intestine, helping people digest fiber and make vitamins and other molecules. They also help strengthen the immune system and protect against potentially harmful bacteria, Stanford University School of Medicine researchers say. The rise in farming some 15,000 years ago dramatically changed the human diet, the researchers noted. And in just the last 100 years, people have become increasingly sedentary and less likely to consume fiber-rich whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Antibiotics, cesarean sections and other lifestyle changes have also helped shift the composition of microbes in the human gut, the study authors added. To see how "progress" may have affected microbial diversity, the researchers examined ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Constipation, Dietary Supplementation, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Dietary Fiber Supplementation, Acute Abdomen

Popular Heartburn Drugs Don't Raise Risk of Alzheimer's: Study

Posted 19 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 18, 2017 – Widely used heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors do not appear to increase Alzheimer's disease risk, according to a new study. Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid are commonly used proton pump inhibitors. Two previous studies reported a higher risk of dementia among people who took the drugs, which are commonly used by older adults. Proton pump inhibitors work by reducing the production of stomach acid. But this new study found that use of the drugs was not associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's, even among those who took a higher dose or used the drugs for more than three years. The findings are from an analysis of data from Finland on nearly 71,000 Alzheimer's disease patients and nearly 283,000 people without the disease. The study shows people need not avoid the drugs due to fears about developing Alzheimer's, said the University of Eastern ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Pantoprazole, Protonix, Indigestion, Alzheimer's Disease, Dexilant, Lansoprazole, Prevacid, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Erosive Esophagitis, Duodenal Ulcer, Aciphex, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Esophageal Disease, Rabeprazole, Esomeprazole, Zegerid

Can Your Heartburn Meds Shorten Your Life?

Posted 4 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 3, 2017 – Popular heartburn medications like Nexium, Prilosec or Prevacid may increase your risk of early death when taken for extended periods, a new study suggests. Further, the longer you take these drugs, known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), the greater your risk of early death, said senior researcher Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly. He is a kidney specialist and assistant professor of medicine with the Washington University School of Medicine, in St. Louis. "There was a relationship between duration of use and risk of death," Al-Aly said. "More prolonged use was associated with even higher risk." That said, Al-Aly pointed out that some patients really do need to take PPIs to deal with medical issues, even long-term. "Proton pump inhibitors actually save lives," Al-Aly said. "We don't want to leave people with a scary message. If you need this drug and you're under guidance of a ... Read more

Related support groups: GERD, Omeprazole, Nexium, Prilosec, Pantoprazole, Protonix, Indigestion, Dexilant, Lansoprazole, Prevacid, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Barrett's Esophagus, Aciphex, Duodenitis/Gastritis, Rabeprazole, Esomeprazole, Zegerid, Prilosec OTC, Prevacid SoluTab, Dexlansoprazole

Could a High IQ Mean a Longer Life?

Posted 29 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 – A high IQ might do more than help you garner good grades: New research suggests it might also lengthen your life. Scottish researchers analyzed data on nearly 66,000 people who were born in that country in 1936, took an IQ test at age 11, and were followed up to age 79 or death. The investigators discovered that children with high IQs were more likely to live longer than their less intelligent peers. Specifically, a higher IQ test score in childhood was associated with a 28 percent reduced risk of death from respiratory disease, a 25 percent lower risk of death from heart disease and a 24 percent reduced risk of death from stroke. But the study didn't prove that high IQ caused this reduced risk, just that an association existed. A higher IQ in childhood was also significantly associated with a lower risk of death from injury, smoking-related cancers ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

High-Intensity Exercise May Be Bad for the Bowels

Posted 16 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – When it comes to stomach discomfort during exercise, forget that old adage "no pain, no gain." New research suggests that excessive strenuous exercise may lead to gut damage. "The stress response of prolonged vigorous exercise shuts down gut function," said lead author Ricardo Costa. "The redistribution of blood flow away from the gut and towards working muscles creates gut cell injury that may lead to cell death, leaky gut, and systemic immune responses due to intestinal bacteria entering general circulation," Costa added. He's a senior researcher with the department of nutrition, dietetics and food at Monash University in Australia. Researchers observed that the risk of gut injury and impaired function seems to increase along with the intensity and duration of exercise. The problem is dubbed "exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome." The researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Dietary Supplementation, Mobic, Indigestion, Motrin, Indomethacin, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Toradol, Nabumetone, Gastroenteritis, Etodolac, Flector, Arthrotec

Health Tip: Clean Your Refrigerator

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A clean refrigerator can help prevent food-related illness. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers these suggestions: Immediately clean up spilled juices, particularly from raw meat. To defrost, always put uncooked meat on the bottom shelf inside a container with a lid. Use warm, soapy water and a sponge to clean shelves, drawers and other surfaces. Avoid spray cleaners. Dry with a clean paper towel or cloth. Clean the door handle frequently. Place an open box of baking soda inside your fridge to absorb odors. Change it every three months. Wipe away dust from the front grill of your refrigerator to keep it working efficiently. Read more

Related support groups: Gastrointestinal Disorders, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Fecal Transplant Shows Early Promise Against Autism

Posted 27 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 – A small study suggests a novel treatment for kids with autism: Give these young patients a fresh supply of healthy gut bacteria via a fecal transplant. After the procedure, the children experienced a 25 percent reduction in symptoms related to language, social interaction and repetitive behaviors, said study co-author James Adams, an autism researcher at Arizona State University. Not only that, the kids also became less hyperactive, irritable and lethargic, Adams said. "It's not a cure for autism, but in 10 weeks we were able to make a substantial dent," he said. Many children with autism suffer from chronic gastrointestinal problems like diarrhea and constipation, often from infancy, Adams explained. That may be because they either carry harmful gut bacteria or lack many healthy strains. "Most people have about a thousand different species of bacteria in ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Constipation, Autism, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Acidophilus, Diarrhea, Chronic, Asperger Syndrome, Florastor, Diarrhea, Acute, VSL#3, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Lactinex, Flora-Q, Floranex, Saccharomyces Boulardii Lyo, BD Lactinex, Florajen3, Flora-Q 2, Bio-K+, Florajen

Stress May Explain Digestive Issues in Kids With Autism

Posted 20 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 – Many children with autism suffer from gastrointestinal problems, such as belly pain and constipation. And new research suggests that these issues may stem from a heightened response to stress. "When treating a patient with autism who has constipation and other lower gastrointestinal issues, physicians may give them a laxative to address these issues," said study author Dr. David Beversdorf. "Our findings suggest there may be a subset of patients for which there may be other contributing factors. More research is needed, but anxiety and stress reactivity may be an important factor when treating these patients," he added. Beversdorf is an associate professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia's Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. The new study included 120 young people with autism and their parents. The parents provided information ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Autism, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Asperger Syndrome

For a Colicky Baby, You Might Give Acupuncture a Try

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 – For beleaguered parents desperate to soothe a colicky baby, Swedish researchers have a novel suggestion – acupuncture. After two weeks of treatment, about two-thirds of babies given acupuncture no longer had colic compared to just over a third of infants who didn't have the needle treatment, lead researcher Kajsa Landgren said. She's a lecturer at Lund University in Lund, Sweden. "Infantile colic is common, and there is no medical treatment, causing desperate parents to seek complementary medicine like acupuncture," she said. Colic is a catchall term for otherwise healthy babies who cry for more than three hours a day, three or more days a week. The cause of colic is typically unknown. As many as 20 percent of babies may have colic, the researchers said. No specific treatment or medicine is available. Typical treatment usually consists of comforting the baby by ... Read more

Related support groups: Gas, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Delivery, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Vomiting Disorder on Rise in Weed-Friendly Colorado

Posted 6 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 – Long-term heavy marijuana use can cause chronic vomiting and abdominal pain in some people, new research suggests. And the syndrome could become more frequent and pervasive as more states legalize use of the drug, according to health experts. Cases of the disorder, which is called cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), doubled in Colorado as access to legal marijuana became widespread, said Dr. Kennon Heard. He is chief of medical toxicology for the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. "All of the emergency departments in the state now are seeing this on a daily to weekly basis," Heard said. "There are a lot of patients ending up in the emergency room with this, and presumably there are even more who don't come to the emergency room, who just ride it out at home." Patients who develop the syndrome typically smoke marijuana on a daily basis, and have ... Read more

Related support groups: Nausea/Vomiting, Vomiting, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Motion Sickness, Cannabis, Nausea/Vomiting - Postoperative, Nausea/Vomiting of Pregnancy

Sleep Loss Tied to Changes in Gut Bacteria

Posted 11 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Getting too little sleep alters the balance of bacteria in the gut, a change that's linked to certain metabolic conditions, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, new research shows. For the study, European researchers limited the sleep of nine healthy men who were a normal weight to examine how sleep loss affects the number of types of bacteria in the gut. For two days in a row, the men slept only four hours a night. The study showed the diversity of gut bacteria didn't change but sleep loss did alter the balance of the existing groups of bacteria. The study results were published recently in the journal Molecular Metabolism. These changes parallel some of the differences seen when obese people have been compared with normal-weight people in other studies, senior study author Dr. Jonathan Cedernaes, said in a journal news release. He's with Uppsala University in ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Narcolepsy, Sleep Apnea, Drowsiness, Night Terrors, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated, Hypersomnia, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder

Health Highlights: Oct. 29, 2016

Posted 30 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: First Baby With Zika-Linked Microcephaly Born in Puerto Rico The first baby born with Zika-linked microcephaly has been born in Puerto Rico, health officials there said Friday. Born within the past two weeks, the newborn suffered severe birth defects and is still in the hospital, the Associated Press reported. Microcephaly, a birth defect where a baby is born with an abnormally small head and underdeveloped brain, was not detected in the fetus until the eighth month of pregnancy. The infant also has hearing and vision problems, Dr. Ana Rius, Puerto Rico's Secretary of Health, told the wire service. Authorities are investigating why the case was identified so late although the mother showed Zika symptoms in the first trimester of her pregnancy, Rius told the AP. She added that the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Gas, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Ovarian Cancer, Zika Virus Infection

The Scoop About Healthy Poop

Posted 25 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 – Your bowel movements can offer important clues about your health, a doctor says. If bowel movements feel comfortable, then it's likely all is well, said Dr. Gabriel Neal, a family medicine doctor and clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Medicine. "Normal bowel movements are relatively soft but dense. They should be any shade of brown or green," Neal said in a college news release. Viruses and bacteria in the intestinal tract can cause stool discoloration, diarrhea or blood in the stool. The color of the blood can help your doctor pinpoint the location of the infection. "If an infection is in the lower intestines or colon, then the blood in your stool is going to be red. If you find black blood, then the blood has oxidized and is from higher up in your digestive tract, such as the stomach or upper intestines," Neal said. People with gallbladder ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Constipation, Crohn's Disease, Constipation - Chronic, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Gallbladder Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Constipation - Acute, Diarrhea, Chronic, Diarrhea, Acute, Infectious Diarrhea

Number of Americans on Gluten-Free Diet Tripled in 5 Years

Posted 6 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 – Gluten-free diets seem to be the latest fad, yet the number of people being diagnosed with celiac disease hasn't budged, new research shows. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder, in which foods containing gluten trigger the immune system to attack and damage the small intestine, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Gluten is a protein found naturally in grains like wheat, barley and rye. People with celiac disease have no choice but to avoid gluten in their diet. If they don't, their small intestine is damaged every time they eat something with gluten. Gluten-free diets also appear to have become a trendy way to address any sort of gastrointestinal problem, said lead author Dr. Hyun-seok Kim, an internal medicine resident at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, N.J. "People may have a gluten sensitivity or non-specific gastrointestinal ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Celiac Disease, Gastrointestinal Disorders

Patients May Quickly Lose Beneficial Gut Bacteria in the ICU

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – Intensive care patients have a significant loss of helpful gut bacteria within days of entering the hospital, a new study finds. These bacteria help keep people well. Losing them puts patients at risk for hospital-acquired infections that may lead to sepsis, organ failure and even death, according to the researchers. For the study, the investigators analyzed gut bacteria from 115 intensive care unit (ICU) patients at four hospitals in the United States and Canada. Measurements were taken 48 hours after admission and after either 10 days in the ICU or leaving the hospital. Compared with healthy people, the ICU patients had lower levels of helpful bacteria and higher levels of potentially harmful bacteria, the findings showed. "The results were what we feared them to be. We saw a massive depletion of normal, health-promoting species," study leader Dr. Paul ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Sepsis, Organ Transplant, Septicemia, Wound Sepsis

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Nausea / Vomiting, Constipation, Indigestion, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Stomach Ulcer, Gastric Ulcer, Diarrhea, Duodenal Ulcer, Gas, view more... Hemorrhoids, Hiatal Hernia, Gastroenteritis, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Lactose Intolerance, Anal Itching, Peptic Ulcer, Ascites, Dumping Syndrome, Gastrointestinal Diverticula, Intraabdominal Infection, Gallbladder Disease, Pancreatitis, Abdominal Distension, Functional Gastric Disorder, Dysphagia, Anal Fissure and Fistula, Mucositis, Gastrointestinal Decontamination, Abdominal Adhesions, Inguinal Hernia, Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth, Malabsorption Syndrome, Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage, Intestinal Obstruction, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor, Incisional Hernia, Fecal Incontinence, Colitis, Gastric Motility Disorder, Closure of Colostomy, Esophageal Disease, Colonic Ulceration, Small Bowel or Pancreatic Fistula, Gastrointestinal Obstruction, Acute Abdomen, Gastrointestinal Perforation, Fructose Intolerance, Postoperative Ileus, Intestinal Anastomoses, Achlorhydria, Abdominopelvic Fistulas, Gallbladder Fistula