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Related terms: Arteriosclerotic Heart Disease, Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), Coronary Heart Disease, CAD, CHD

Could Skipping Breakfast Feed Heart Disease?

Posted 2 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 2, 2017 – Middle-aged adults who routinely skip breakfast are more likely to have clogged heart arteries than those who enjoy a big morning meal, a new study finds. The findings are the latest to link breakfast to better heart health. They suggest that people who eat breakfast – especially a hearty one – are less likely to harbor plaques in their arteries. Plaques are deposits of fat, calcium and other substances that can build up in arteries, causing them to harden and narrow – a condition called atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis can lead to heart attacks, strokes and other complications. The new study does not prove that skipping breakfast directly harms people's arteries. "It's not that you skip breakfast, you get plaques," said senior researcher Jose Penalvo, of Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. But, he said, there are ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Women Who Have Heart Disease

Posted 28 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 – Women with heart disease aren't treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why, a new Canadian study suggests. "It appears that by the time women present with heart disease, they are slightly older and may be facing more comorbidities such as obesity and diabetes," explained study senior author Dr. Fraser Rubens, from the University of Ottawa's Heart Institute. "As a consequence, these higher operative risks may preclude women from undergoing the more complex, multiple arterial revascularization procedures that men receive," he said. Revascularization, or heart bypass surgery, is the grafting of arteries to restore blood flow to damaged areas of the heart. "With earlier diagnoses, women could be referred for revascularization as healthier surgical candidates, affording them the opportunity of complete ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Do E-Cigarettes Damage Blood Vessels?

Posted 11 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 – Nicotine in e-cigarettes may cause stiffened arteries, which can lead to an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, a small Swedish study suggests. With the dramatic increase in e-cigarette use ("vaping") over the past few years, questions have arisen about their safety. And while many people think the devices are harmless, especially compared with regular cigarettes, little is known about long-term effects of these devices, according to lead researcher Magnus Lundback, from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. "Increased arterial stiffness has previously been demonstrated following exposure to conventional cigarettes," said Lundback, who is a research leader and clinical registrar at the Danderyd University Hospital. "We think that chronic exposure to e-cigarettes with nicotine may lead to stiffer arteries and, in the long run, an increased risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Nicorette, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Commit, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Habitrol, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep, Nicotrol TD

Bystander CPR Less Likely in Black Neighborhoods

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – If your heart suddenly stops beating, the racial makeup of the neighborhood may determine the likelihood of receiving CPR from a passer-by or having access to a public defibrillator, researchers say. These lifesaving treatments for cardiac arrest occur less often in black neighborhoods in the United States, researchers discovered. Delaying CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) can dramatically reduce the odds of surviving cardiac arrest. "We have known that there are differences in the rates of survival from cardiac arrest between blacks and whites, but it was surprising to see how the demographics of a neighborhood affected outcomes of residents who experience cardiac arrest," said Dr. Monique Starks, the study's lead author. She's a cardiologist at the Duke Clinical Research Institute in Durham, N.C. "This is absolutely a call to action to improve and expand ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiac Arrest, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Oxygen Therapy Doesn't Boost Heart Attack Survival

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Oxygen therapy is a routine treatment for people suspected of having a heart attack, but a new study suggests there may be no benefit for these patients. That was true even for patients who were older, smoked or had diabetes or heart disease, according to the Swedish researchers. The "study questions the current practice of routine oxygen therapy for all patients with suspected [heart attack]," said lead author Dr. Robin Hofmann, a cardiologist from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Patients who may have had a heart attack and are having trouble breathing, not getting adequate oxygen or have heart failure are often treated with oxygen therapy, in which oxygen is delivered through a mask or tubes in the nose, the researchers explained. "ESC [European Society of Cardiology] guidelines have gradually shifted towards more restrictive use of oxygen," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Oxygen, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Sleepless Nights Do No Favors for Your Heart

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Poor sleep won't simply leave you bleary-eyed. It's also linked with stroke and reduced blood supply to the heart, a new study suggests. "Poor sleep" includes too short or too long sleep, difficulty falling asleep and difficulty maintaining sleep, said lead researcher Dr. Nobuo Sasaki. "Poor sleep is associated with cardiovascular diseases ... but the kind of sleep disturbances that are most risky is not well documented," said Sasaki, of the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council in Japan. The researchers set out to investigate sleep problems linked to heart attack and angina (coronary artery disease), and stroke. Coronary artery disease is caused by narrowed heart arteries. This means less blood and oxygen reach the heart, raising the risk for heart attack and chest pain known as angina, according to the American Heart Association. The observational study ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Lisinopril, Fatigue, Amlodipine, Losartan, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Benicar, Diovan, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Verapamil, Ramipril, Sleep Apnea, Nifedipine, Cozaar, Valsartan, Enalapril, Micardis

More Support for Tight Blood Pressure Control

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 – For people at increased risk of heart disease, intensive blood pressure control may be just as safe as standard treatment, a new study finds. Experts said the results bolster the case for more aggressive treatment of high blood pressure. Two years ago, a U.S. government-funded trial called SPRINT challenged the standard approach to treating high blood pressure. Intensive control meant using medication to get patients' systolic pressure – the top number – below 120 mm Hg. That was a big change from standard treatment, where the aim is to get below 140 mm Hg, or in some cases 150. Driving down blood pressure to lower levels had major benefits for people at increased risk of heart attack. That included people age 75 and older, and patients with existing heart disease or multiple risk factors for it such as smoking and high cholesterol. Overall, the aggressive ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Smoking, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Propranolol, Hydrochlorothiazide, Benicar, Diovan, Smoking Cessation, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Coreg

Which Heart Bypass Surgery Works Best?

Posted 17 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 – Five years after heart bypass surgery, patients whose operation was done using a heart-lung pump lived longer than those whose surgeons didn't use the device, a new study finds. Since the 1990s, two different approaches have been commonly used by heart surgeons to perform coronary artery bypass graft operations. Coronary artery bypass creates new routes for blood to flow to the heart because old routes are blocked by plaque in the artery. A piece of blood vessel is taken from another area of the body (often the leg) and used to "bypass" a blocked vessel going to the heart, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The two different ways to do this surgery have been referred to as "on-pump," assisted by a heart-lung machine, or "off-pump." Which procedure produces better results has been controversial, the researchers said. "The ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Coronary Arteriography

Heart Risk Up if Hospitalized for Pneumonia or Sepsis

Posted 12 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 – Adults who've been hospitalized with pneumonia or sepsis have a higher risk of heart disease, a new European study reports. Researchers examined data from nearly 237,000 Swedish men. They were followed from age 18 into middle age. The study found that those admitted to the hospital with pneumonia or sepsis (a bacterial infection of the blood) had a six times higher risk of heart disease in the following year. The rate dropped significantly during the second and third years, but was still more than double. And, by the fourth and fifth years, the risk remained almost two times higher in those who'd been hospitalized for sepsis or pneumonia compared to those who hadn't. The study was published recently in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. While most patients with sepsis or pneumonia recover from these conditions, many still have inflammation after the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Losartan, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Benicar, Pneumonia, Diovan, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Angina, Ramipril, Cozaar, Valsartan, Micardis, Enalapril

By Age 12, Poor May Show Signs of Heart Risks Ahead

Posted 10 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9, 2017 – Children from poor families are more likely than their richer peers to show signs of narrowing in the neck arteries – hinting they could face a heightened risk of heart disease as adults. That's the finding of a new study that followed children from nearly 1,500 Australian families. The study builds on evidence that heart disease risk can start to take shape at a young age. It also adds another layer: Social disparities in heart disease risk may begin early in life, too, said Dr. Gregg Fonarow. Fonarow, who was not involved in the study, is co-director of preventative cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. It's well-known that poor adults face a higher heart disease risk than their more-affluent counterparts, Fonarow said. But it hasn't been clear whether kids from poor families are more likely to show early warning signs of unhealthy ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Heart Disease, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Angina, Ramipril, Cozaar, Valsartan, Enalapril, Micardis, Benazepril, Avapro, Atacand, Irbesartan, Perindopril, Candesartan, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Telmisartan, Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis

Fewer U.S. Dollars Spent on Cardiac Arrest Research: Study

Posted 12 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 – Cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, yet it receives much less government funding for research than other leading causes of death, researchers report. Adjusted for inflation, U.S. National Institutes of Health funding for cardiac arrest research fell from $35.4 million in 2007 to $28.5 million in 2016, the study authors said. Cardiac arrest – the sudden loss of heart function – claims more than 450,000 lives in the United States each year, according to the Institute of Medicine. "If you look at the public health burden of cardiac arrest, it's a major public health issue," said senior author Dr. Robert Neumar. He is chair of the University of Michigan Health System's emergency medicine department. In 2015, the NIH invested about $13,000 for each death from diabetes versus $91 for each death from cardiac arrest, the study ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Cardiac Arrest, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Opioids a Threat to Seniors With COPD

Posted 6 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 – Seniors with COPD – a progressive lung disease that causes breathing problems – may increase their odds for heart-related death if they use opioid painkillers, a new study finds. COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder) patients are often prescribed opioids, including morphine and fentanyl. These narcotics can help treat chronic muscle and bone pain, insomnia, persistent cough and shortness of breath despite inhaler use, the researchers explained. "Previous research has shown about 70 percent of older adults with COPD use opioids, which is an incredibly high rate of new use in a population that is potentially more sensitive to narcotics," said study lead author Dr. Nicholas Vozoris. "Our new findings show there are not only increased risks for coronary artery disease-related death associated with new opioid use, but also increased risk of cardiac-related ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone, Tramadol, Percocet, Methadone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Opana, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Subutex, Dilaudid, Heart Attack, Opana ER, Roxicodone

Can a 70-Year-Old Have the Arteries of a 20-Year-Old?

Posted 30 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 – Imagine having the clear, supple, healthy blood vessels of a 20-year-old in your 70s. It's possible, but "challenging," a new study suggests. Still, if you eat right, exercise and stay trim, you have a shot at offsetting age-related blood vessel degeneration, according to this study of more than 3,000 adults. Genetics played less of a role than lifestyle in keeping blood vessels young, the researchers found. Over time, blood vessels stiffen and blood pressure rises, leading to a significant risk for heart disease and stroke, said Dr. Teemu Niiranen. He is a research fellow at Boston University School of Medicine and the Framingham Heart Study. "We didn't find any magic bullet that kept people's blood vessels young," he said. "It seems that these are people who just lead a very healthy lifestyle." Heart disease is really a lifestyle disease, Niiranen explained. ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Hypertensive Heart Disease

Heart Disease the No. 1 Killer Worldwide

Posted 17 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 – Roughly a third of all deaths around the world are the result of heart disease and stroke, making cardiovascular disease the number one killer globally, new research finds. Big declines in heart disease-driven fatalities in countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea and many countries in Western Europe have started to level off over the past 20 years, investigators reported. "It is an alarming threat to global health," said study lead author Dr. Gregory Roth, an assistant professor of cardiology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. "Trends in cardiovascular disease mortality are no longer declining for high-income regions," he noted in an American College of Cardiology news release, "and low- and middle-income countries are also seeing more cardiovascular disease-related deaths." The study included 2,300 ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Alcoholism, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Hangover, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Exercise Benefits Aging Hearts, Even Those of the Obese

Posted 24 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – Exercise can reduce the risk of heart damage in middle-aged adults and seniors – even in those who are obese, according to a new study. "The protective association of physical activity against [heart] damage may have implications for heart failure risk reduction, particularly among the high-risk group of individuals with excess weight," study lead author Dr. Roberta Florido said in an American College of Cardiology news release. Florido is a cardiology fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. "Promoting physical activity," she added, "may be a particularly important strategy for heart failure risk reductions among high risk groups such as those with obesity." To gauge the influence of physical activity on heart health, the researchers looked at the experience of more than 9,400 people between 45 and 64 years of age. The participants ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease

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