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Related terms: Arteriosclerotic Heart Disease, Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), Coronary Heart Disease, CAD, CHD

On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect'

Posted 27 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 – Hospitalized patients have a higher risk of cardiac arrest and transfers to intensive care if they're in wards when other patients have recently suffered similar emergencies, a new study suggests. "This should serve as a wake-up call for hospital-based physicians," study author Dr. Matthew Churpek, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, said in a university news release. "After caring for a patient who becomes critically ill on the hospital wards, we should routinely check to see how the other patients on the unit are doing," he said. "Following these high-intensity events, our to-do list should include a thorough assessment of the other patients on the unit, to make sure none of them are at risk of slipping through the cracks," he added. Churpek's team tracked outcomes for adult patients who were admitted to the University of Chicago ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Smoking Raises Heart Attack Risk 8-Fold in People Under 50

Posted 30 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – All smokers face a higher risk of heart attack, but the threat is particularly high among those under 50, a new study finds. Compared to former smokers and nonsmokers in their age group, heart attack risk was nearly 8.5 times higher for smokers younger than 50, British researchers found. One expert in smoking and health who reviewed the report said the findings underline the importance of keeping youth and cigarettes apart. "Through comprehensive tobacco-control programs that include environmental smoking bans, high taxes on cigarettes, and anti-tobacco media campaigns, we can decrease the rates of smoking/tobacco use, heart disease and many other health conditions," said Patricia Folan. She directs the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. The study found that smokers at older ages faced higher heart risks, as well. Compared to ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Heart Attack, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Myocardial Infarction, Nicorette, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Nicoderm CQ, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Atherosclerosis, Habitrol, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS

Does a Little Daily Drinking Really Help the Heart?

Posted 29 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 – Many studies have hinted that alcohol, in moderation, can do a heart good. But new research suggests that moderate drinkers are no more likely than teetotalers to have clear arteries. The scientists looked at almost 2,000 patients who underwent CT angiography – an imaging test that detects "plaques" in heart arteries. Overall, there was no association between people's drinking habits and their odds of showing clogged vessels. The findings stand in contrast to past studies that have linked moderate drinking to a lower risk of heart disease – where plaques build up in the heart arteries and may eventually trigger a heart attack. Researchers said an advantage of the new study is that it used objective measurements. "No prior studies have assessed the relationship between alcohol consumption and the presence of coronary heart disease as depicted by coronary CT ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Hangover, Ischemic Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Many Women With Chronic Ills Don't Use Online Tools

Posted 28 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 28, 2016 – Chronically ill women who don't use the internet may struggle with worse health, a new study finds. "A significantly larger proportion of non-internet users reported needing help learning what to do to manage their health conditions and needing help learning how to care for their health conditions," said researcher Carolyn Mendez-Luck. She's an assistant professor in the School of Social and Behavioral Health Sciences at Oregon State University. She and her colleagues analyzed information provided by hundreds of American women aged 44 and older with at least one chronic condition. These included heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, arthritis, asthma, emphysema and anxiety. More than one-third didn't use the internet. And fewer than half of those who did have access used the web to learn from others with a chronic disease, the researchers found. Also, fewer ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Osteoarthritis, Asthma, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Breast Cancer, Heart Attack, Asthma - Maintenance, Angina, Insulin Resistance, Colorectal Cancer, Asthma - Acute, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Diabetes Mellitus, Bronchiectasis

Take Meds as Directed to Boost Survival After Heart Procedures

Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 – Taking medications as prescribed improves outcomes for heart procedure patients, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 973 heart bypass patients and 2,255 patients who underwent angioplasty and stenting to reopen clogged heart arteries. Heart bypass surgery is when surgeons take a piece of blood vessel from somewhere else in the body to bypass a blocked portion of the heart's artery. Angioplasty is performed using a thin catheter that's threaded through the blood vessels to the heart. A balloon on the end of the catheter is inflated to open the narrowed blood vessel. Sometimes a stent (a mesh or wire tube) will be left in the blood vessel to keep it open. Prescribed medications in the study included cholesterol-lowering statins, blood thinners and beta blockers. Follow-up information was collected 12 to 18 months after the heart procedures. Overall, ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Aspirin, Metoprolol, Atenolol, Lipitor, Propranolol, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Bystolic, Pravastatin, Carvedilol, Bisoprolol, Excedrin, Inderal, Coreg, Zocor, Sotalol, Lovastatin, Toprol-XL

Statins Often Interact With Other Heart Drugs

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Cholesterol-lowering statins can interact with other drugs prescribed for heart disease. But there are ways to navigate the problem, according to new recommendations from the American Heart Association. Statins are among the mostly widely prescribed drugs in the United States. Roughly one-quarter of Americans age 40 and up are on a statin, according to a 2014 study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drugs are prescribed to people who either have atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) or are at risk of it, which means many statin users also take other cardiovascular drugs, the heart association says. The benefits of those drug combinations will generally outweigh the risks, said Barbara Wiggins, a clinical pharmacy specialist in cardiology at the Medical University of South Carolina. But doctors and patients should be aware of how the drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Amlodipine, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Diltiazem, Norvasc, Pravastatin, Verapamil, Amiodarone, Digoxin, Nifedipine, Cardizem, Zocor, Azor, Lovastatin, Exforge, Rosuvastatin

Depression Can Fuel Heart Disease in Midlife Women: Study

Posted 6 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 – Women in midlife with a history of depression appear at markedly greater risk of suffering from heart disease, new research suggests. The finding seems to reinforce the well-known link between depression and heart troubles, but it doesn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship. Tracking about 1,100 women over 10 years, researchers found that depression was the only significant risk factor for coronary artery disease in women younger than 65 who had no history of heart ailments at the beginning of the study. In women over age 65, however, age was identified as the only significant predictor for heart disease, the investigators found. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both women and men in the United States, responsible for one in four deaths each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Once we added depression... ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Heart Disease, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Coronary Arteriography

Drug-Coated Stents Don't Improve Patient Survival, Large Study Reports

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – The largest trial ever conducted on stents – tiny tubes that help keep heart arteries open – suggests that pricey drug-coated (or eluting) versions may perform no better for patients over the long-term, in terms of patient survival, compared to cheaper, "bare metal" versions. "The evidence in favor of contemporary drug-eluting stents over bare-metal stents may not be as strong as has been thought," said study author Dr. Kaare Harald Bonaa. He's from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. Bare-metal stents were used in the early days of stenting. But, arteries sometimes re-closed around the stent. That meant surgeons often had to go back in and re-open the vessel – a procedure called revascularization. Then came drug-eluting stents. These devices were coated with drugs to prevent the vessel re-closure that plagued so many ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Vascular Surgery, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Revascularization Procedures, Coronary Arteriography

Stress May Take Greatest Toll on Younger Women's Hearts: Study

Posted 24 Aug 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24, 2016 – Stress may be especially hard on the hearts of younger women who have heart disease, new research suggests. Researchers gave nearly 700 men and women with heart disease a mentally stressful public speaking assignment. Then they measured blood flow to the heart. Women aged 50 or younger were nearly four times more likely than men of the same age or older women to have reduced blood flow to the heart, said study leader Dr. Viola Vaccarino. She is chair of epidemiology at Emory University Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta. Reduced blood flow – known medically as myocardial ischemia – can lead to a heart attack, she noted. "Younger women appear to be more vulnerable [than men and older women] to the effects of stress on their heart," Vaccarino said. Experts have long known that younger women have worse outcomes than men of the same age after a heart ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

FDA approves first absorbable stent for coronary artery disease

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

July 5, 2016 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first fully absorbable stent to treat coronary artery disease. The Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (BVS), which releases the drug everolimus to limit the growth of scar tissue, is gradually absorbed by the body in approximately three years. “The FDA’s approval of the Absorb GT1 BVS offers a new treatment option for individuals who are candidates for angioplasty, but would prefer an absorbable device rather than a permanent metallic coronary stent,” said Bram Zuckerman, M.D., director of the division of cardiovascular devices at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Coronary heart disease is responsible for about 370,000 deaths each year in the U.S., according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The condition develops when cholesterol-containing deposits build up and n ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)

FDA Approves First Fully Dissolvable Stent

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 5, 2016 – The first coronary stent to be gradually absorbed by the body has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (BVS) is absorbed within about three years, the agency said Tuesday in a news release. The stent, a hollow mesh tube designed to prop open a formerly clogged artery, also releases the drug everolimus to limit the growth of scar tissue. Coronary artery disease leads to some 370,000 deaths annually in the United States, the FDA said. It occurs when cholesterol-laden deposits build up and narrow blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the heart. Symptoms commonly include chest pain, shortness of breath and fatigue. The condition is frequently treated using a procedure called angioplasty, in which a balloon-like device is expanded within an artery to open the vessel. But scar tissue can then ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Acute Coronary Syndrome, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Revascularization Procedures - Prophylaxis, Coronary Arteriography, Revascularization Procedures

Elderly Patients Get Unnecessary End-of-Life Treatments

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 – People dying naturally of old age often receive unnecessary end-of-life medical treatments in hospitals, a new global study finds. The Australian-based research found that one-third of patients with advanced, irreversible chronic conditions were given treatments that didn't necessarily benefit them – including admission to intensive care or chemotherapy – in the last two weeks of their life. The study also revealed that one-quarter of older patients who had Do-Not-Resuscitate orders were still given cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). People with serious conditions were subjected to invasive procedures, unnecessary scans and blood tests, intensive heart monitoring and other treatments that did little to alter their outcomes, sometimes against their wishes, the researchers found. "It is not unusual for family members to refuse to accept the fact that their ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease, Body Imaging, Infectious Heart Disease

Are Omega-3s Linked to Lower Risk for Fatal Heart Attack?

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 27, 2016 – Regularly eating fish and other foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids may lower your risk of fatal heart disease, a new research review suggests. "Our results lend support to the importance of fish and omega-3 consumption as part of a healthy diet," said senior study author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, in Boston. "At a time when some but not other trials of fish oil supplementation have shown benefits, there is uncertainty about cardiovascular effects of omega-3s," Mozaffarian said in a university news release. Fish are the main dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Fatty fish, such as salmon, trout, anchovies, sardines and herring, are the richest source of these nutrients. Walnuts, flaxseed oil, canola oil and some other seeds and nuts contain the plant-based omega-3 known as ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Fish Oil, Lovaza, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Omega-3, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Omacor, Ischemic Heart Disease, MaxEPA, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, EPA Fish Oil, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Omega 3-6-9 Complex, Animi-3, Restora, Marine Lipid Concentrate, MegaKrill, TherOmega

Heart Disease Down Among Over-40 Americans

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – America's heart health seems to be improving, a new study reports. Federal researchers found that fewer Americans over 40 have coronary heart disease. The rate is down from just over 10 percent in 2001-2002 to 8 percent in 2011-2012, the study found. Despite the overall decline, there wasn't a significant change in heart disease rates for people from 40 to 59 years old. But the rate among those 60 and older fell from 19.5 percent to 15 percent, the researchers said. The rate among women dropped more than 2 percent during the study period. There were also significant declines in coronary heart disease among whites and blacks, the study revealed. Having health insurance was also linked to better heart disease rates, the study authors said. The study was carried out by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease a Dangerous Combo

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 11, 2016 – Prospects for people with type 2 diabetes and heart disease may be grimmer than previously believed, researchers report. "Type 2 diabetes accompanied by an acute coronary syndrome needs much more attention, especially in order to prevent yet another major cardiac event," said study leader Dr. William White. He is a professor with the University of Connecticut Health Center's Calhoun Cardiology Center. The study included more than 5,300 people around the world with type 2 diabetes. Those admitted to the hospital for congestive heart failure had a 24 percent to 28 percent chance of dying within 18 months. That's five times higher than the risk among those not hospitalized for a major heart problem, the researchers said. The risk of heart disease is two to three times higher among people with type 2 diabetes than in the general population, the study authors ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Diabetes Mellitus, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

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