Generic Name: hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene (HYE dro klor oh THY a zide and trye AM ter een)
Brand Names: Dyazide, Maxzide, Maxzide-25

What is Dyazide?

Dyazide contains a combination of hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene. Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic (water pill) that helps prevent your body from absorbing too much salt, which can cause fluid retention. Triamterene is a potassium-sparing diuretic that also prevents your body from absorbing too much salt and keeps your potassium levels from getting too low.

Dyazide is used to treat fluid retention (edema) and high blood pressure (hypertension).

Dyazide may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

You should not use Dyazide if you are allergic to hydrochlorothiazide or triamterene, or if you have kidney disease, urination problems, high levels of potassium in your blood, or if you are taking other diuretics similar to triamterene. Do not use potassium supplements unless your doctor has told you to.

Before using Dyazide, tell your doctor if you have heart or liver disease, glaucoma, diabetes, a breathing disorder, gout, lupus, kidney stones, a pancreas disorder, or an allergy to sulfa drugs or penicillin.

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Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of Dyazide.

Avoid a diet high in salt. Too much salt will cause your body to retain water and can make this medication less effective.

Do not use potassium supplements, salt substitutes, or low-sodium milk while you are taking Dyazide, unless your doctor has told you to.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using Dyazide even if you feel fine. High blood pressure often has no symptoms.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Dyazide if you are allergic to hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Lotensin HCT, Prinzide, Zestoretic, Ziac, and others) or triamterene (Dyrenium), or if you have:

  • kidney disease or are unable to urinate;
  • high potassium levels (hyperkalemia);

  • if you are taking diuretics similar to triamterene, such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), spironolactone (Aldactone, Aldactazide); or

  • if you are taking potassium supplements (unless your doctor tells you to).

To make sure you can safely take Dyazide, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • diabetes;

  • heart disease;

  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;

  • glaucoma;

  • a breathing disorder;

  • gout;

  • lupus;

  • a history of kidney stones;

  • a pancreas disorder; or

  • an allergy to sulfa drugs or penicillin.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Dyazide will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using Dyazide. Hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while taking Dyazide.

See also: Pregnancy and breastfeeding warnings (in more detail)

How should I take Dyazide?

Take Dyazide exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

You will need regular medical tests to be sure Dyazide is not causing harmful effects. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you need surgery or medical tests, tell the doctor ahead of time that you are taking medication that contains hydrochlorothiazide. You may need to stop using Dyazide for a short time.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store Dyazide at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include increased urination, nausea, vomiting, weakness, fever, warmth or flushing in your face, or muscle spasms.

What should I avoid?

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of Dyazide.

Avoid a diet high in salt. Too much salt will cause your body to retain water and can make this medication less effective.

Do not use potassium supplements, salt substitutes, or low-sodium milk while you are taking Dyazide, unless your doctor has told you to. Dyazide may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

Dyazide side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Dyazide: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Dyazide and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • eye pain, vision problems;

  • slow, fast, or uneven heartbeat;

  • feeling like you might pass out;

  • swelling or rapid weight gain;

  • urinating less than usual or not at all;

  • headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, weakness, loss of appetite, feeling unsteady, hallucinations, fainting, seizure, shallow breathing or breathing that stops;

  • low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling);

  • high potassium (irregular heart rate, weak pulse, muscle weakness, tingly feeling);

  • severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;

  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;

  • patchy skin color, red spots, or a butterfly-shaped skin rash over your cheeks and nose (worsens in sunlight);

  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious Dyazide side effects may include:

  • mild nausea, diarrhea, constipation;

  • dizziness, headache;

  • blurred vision;

  • dry mouth;

  • skin rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs can affect Dyazide?

Before using Dyazide, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by Dyazide.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

  • lithium (Eskalith, LithoBid);

  • amphotericin B (Amphotec, AmBisome, Abelcet);

  • methenamine (Hiprex, Mandelamine, Urex);

  • gout medication such as allopurinol (Zyloprim), colchicine (Colcrys), or probenecid (Benemid);

  • steroid medication (prednisone and others);

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

  • insulin or oral diabetes medicine;

  • laxatives;

  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and others; or

  • indomethacin (Indocin) or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), and others.

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Dyazide. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about Dyazide.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects.

Copyright 1996-2014 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 10.02. Revision Date: 2012-03-12, 11:09:24 AM.

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