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GLYFORMIN/METFORMIN

Active substance(s): METFORMIN HYDROCHLORIDE

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1

PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET
GLYFORMIN / Metformin Hydrochloride 500 mg TABLETS
PLEASE READ THIS LEAFLET CAREFULLY BEFORE YOU
START TAKING THIS MEDICINE
KEEP THIS LEAFLET UNTIL YOU HAVE FINISHED ALL THE
PRESCRIBED COURSE OF GLYFORMIN
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS CONCERNING YOUR
MEDICINE ASK YOUR DOCTOR OR PHARMACIST FOR
MORE INFORMATION

What is in your medicine?
The name of this medicine is Glyformin. Each tablet contains
500 mg of Metformin Hydrochloride BP, together with the
following ingredients: Lactose, silicon dioxide, gelatin, sodium
starch glycollate, magnesium stearate,
hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, ethylcellulose, titanium dioxide
(E171), and diethyl phthalate.
Glyformin tablets are white, round, bi-convex film-coated
tablets, and are available in containers of 28, 30, 50, 56, 60, 84,
100, 250, 500 & 1000 tablets, and in blister packs of 28, 30, 50,
56, 60, 84, 100, 250, 500 & 1000 tablets.
The Manufacturer of Glyformin is either: DDSA
Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Chatfield Road, off York Road, London
SW11 3SE or: Meridian Healthcare (UK) Ltd., Chatfield Road,
off York Road, London SW11 3SE
The Product Licence Holder of Glyformin isChelonia
Healthcare Limited, Boumpoulinas 11, 3rd Floor, Nicosia, P.C.
1060, Cyprus.









It is important that you tell your doctor if you are pregnant,
likely to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding.
If you develop any new medical problems while using this
medicine, check with your doctor or pharmacist.

Use in pregnancy & while breast-feeding
Do not take Glyformin if you are pregnant, breast-feeding or
planning a pregnancy.

Can you take Glyformin with other medicines?
It is important that your doctor is aware of any other medication
you are taking, whether it is prescribed or bought without a
prescription from a pharmacy or elsewhere. Your doctor will be
able to identify medicines which you should not take with
Glyformin.
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any of the
following:



Why have you been prescribed Glyformin?
Glyformin belongs to a group of medicines known as antidiabetics. It is used in diabetes occurring in middle age when
diet alone has failed. It is also used in obese diabetic patients
who are not well controlled by insulin, but who are dependent
on insulin and may therefore occasionally benefit when
Glyformin is used together with insulin.
If you are not sure why you have been prescribed Glyformin
then please ask your doctor.

Check before you take Glyformin
Before taking this medicine, tell your doctor if you have ever
had any unusual or allergic reactions to Metformin
Hydrochloride or to any of the other ingredients.
Also tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to any
other substances such as foods, preservatives or dyes.
Because the presence of other medical problems may affect the
use of Glyformin, make sure to tell your doctor if you have had
any of the following:



Liver disease
Kidney disease

Cardiac failure, or recent coronary thrombosis
Lung impairment
Alcoholism (either chronic or acute)
Severe infection
Blocking of the blood vessels of the extremities,
particularly the legs, known as peripheral vascular disease.
Dehydration.
Disturbances in the metabolic state of the blood (lactic
acidosis, hypoxaemia).





Cimetidine (used to treat stomach ulcers), which can
increase blood concentrations of meformin.
Alcohol, which will increase the blood sugar lowering
effects of meformin.
Anti-coagulants such as warfarin (blood-thinners).
Sulphonylureas
Insulin

Patients receiving Glyformin over prolonged periods should
have their levels of Vitamin B12 measured yearly, since levels
may be altered by this medicine.

Proper use of this medicine
Take this medicine by mouth and only in the doses prescribed
by your doctor. Do not take more of it, and do not take it more
often or for a longer time than your doctor ordered.
Dosages:
Adults: Usually one 500 mg tablet 3 times a day, to be taken
with meals. Should control of diabetes be incomplete,
a gradual increase in dosage to a maximum of 3 g
daily, in divided doses, taken together with meals may
be instituted.
This dosage regimen should not be increased above
3 g.
Children: Not recommended.
Elderly: Metformin Hydrochloride, while indicated in the

2

elderly, should not be used when renal function is
impaired.
If you forget to take your medicine, just carry on with the next
dose as normal. Do not take an extra dose to make up for the
missed dose. If you are not sure, ask your doctor or pharmacist
for advice.
If you feel that this medicine is not working as well after you
have taken it for a short time (1-2 weeks) do not increase the
dose, instead check with your doctor.

What to do if too many tablets are taken at the same
time
If you think you may have taken an overdose of this medicine
you must obtain emergency help at once. Go to your doctor or
the Accident & Emergency Department of your nearest hospital
straight away. Take with you any remaining tablets in the
original container so that the medicine can be identified.

What side effects can occur when taking Glyformin?
Although Glyformin is usually well tolerated, gastro-intestinal
disturbances may sometimes occur, and although usually minor
they can normally be avoided by taking Glyformin with, or
after, food.

Storing your medicine
You must keep the medicine in a safe place where children
cannot get it. Your medicine could harm them.
Keep your medicine in a dry place and store below 25ºC, in
securely closed containers.
On the label you will find the words "Expiry Date" followed by
some numbers indicating the day, month and year. This is the
date when the medicine is no longer fit for use. Do not use the
medicine after this date, but return it to your pharmacist.

A reminder
REMEMBER this medicine is for you. Never give it to
someone else, even if their symptoms are the same as yours.
This leaflet does not contain the complete information about
your medicine. If you have any questions or are not sure about
anything, ask your doctor or pharmacist who have access to
additional information.

This leaflet was prepared in February 2009.

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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