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Icodextrin

Generic name: icodextrin (EYE koe dex trin (LVP soe LOO tion))
Brand name: Extraneal
Drug class: Intravenous nutritional products

What is icodextrin?

Icodextrin is a dialysis solution that draws fluid and wastes from your bloodstream into your peritoneal cavity (the space around the organs in your abdomen). These fluids and wastes are removed when the dialysis solution is drained.

Icodextrin is used in peritoneal dialysis that lasts 8 to 16 hours (also called the long dwell exchange) in people with end-stage kidney disease.

Icodextrin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

You should not use icodextrin if you are allergic to icodextrin or cornstarch, or if you have maltose or isomaltose intolerance, severe lactic acidosis, or a glycogen storage disease (an inherited metabolic disorder).

Certain glucose monitors and test strips must not be used while you are being treated with icodextrin. If you have diabetes and you test your blood sugar, ask a doctor or pharmacist about the best type to use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to icodextrin or cornstarch, or if you have:

  • maltose or isomaltose intolerance;

  • severe lactic acidosis; or

  • a glycogen storage disease (an inherited metabolic disorder).

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • high or low blood pressure;

  • congestive heart failure;

  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood);

  • diabetes;

  • a blood infection;

  • a metabolic disorder; or

  • HIV or AIDS.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

How is icodextrin given?

Icodextrin is used in peritoneal dialysis during the long dwell exchange (8 to 16 hours).

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you don't understand all instructions.

Prepare your dose only when you are ready to give the medicine. Do not use if the medicine looks cloudy, has changed colors, or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medicine.

Follow your doctor's instructions about the type and amount of liquids you should drink. In some cases, drinking too much liquid can be as unsafe as not drinking enough.

You will need frequent medical tests.

If you have diabetes and you test your blood sugar using a glucose monitor and test strips, ask a doctor or pharmacist about the best type to use. Certain glucose monitors and test strips must not be used while you are being treated with icodextrin. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using icodextrin.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not freeze. Keep the medicine in its moisture-proof pouch until you are ready to prepare your dose.

You may warm the medication with a heating pad to make it more comfortable to use during dialysis. Do not heat icodextrin with hot water or in a microwave.

After dialysis, throw away any unused portion of the icodextrin solution.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not use two doses at one time.

Do not use icodextrin more than once in a 24 hour period.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Using too much icodextrin can cause swelling or puffiness in your stomach, feeling of fullness, feeling short of breath. Drain the solution from your peritoneal cavity if you have any of these symptoms.

What should I avoid while using icodextrin?

Avoid becoming dehydrated (symptoms include heavy sweating, hot and dry skin, feeling very thirsty or hot, being unable to urinate). Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Icodextrin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, difficult breathing, fever, swollen glands, itching, joint pain, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash with blistering and peeling).

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • stomach pain or tenderness, bloating, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea;

  • fever, increased thirst;

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • swelling, rapid weight gain;

  • shortness of breath;

  • little or no urination; or

  • lactic acidosis--unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, stomach pain, vomiting, irregular heart rate, dizziness, feeling cold, or feeling very weak or tired.

Common side effects may include:

  • rash;

  • increased blood pressure; or

  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect icodextrin?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect icodextrin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.