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How long does it take for Finacea to work?

Medically reviewed by Carmen Fookes, BPharm. Last updated on April 16, 2020.

Official Answer

by Drugs.com
  • Anecdotally, improvements in rosacea symptoms have been reported within two weeks to a month with Finacea
  • A 50 to 58% reduction in papules and pustules has been reported after 12 weeks of treatment
  • 61% reported either a complete clearing of their rosacea or a significant reduction in the number of papules and pustules after 12 weeks of treatment
  • If no improvement is seen within 4 to 8 weeks talk to your doctor.

Finacea is a prescription topical gel that contains 15% azelaic acid. It is FDA approved to treat redness (inflammation) and papules (raised areas of skin of around 1cm) and pustules (small bumps on the skin that contain fluid or pus) caused by mild to moderate rosacea.

Finacea is applied twice daily and it is important to be consistent with the application of the gel, to ensure you get the best results from treatment.

Anecdotally, improvements have been reported in rosacea within the first two weeks to month of using the gel. Research has found that after twelve weeks treatment with twice daily Finacea:

  • Papules and pustules reduced by 50 to 58%
  • Redness and telangiectasia (thread-like tiny red blood vessels) also decreased among research participants
  • 61% reported either a complete clearing of their rosacea or a significant reduction in the number of papules and pustules (an improvement in rosacea to a mild status) after twelve weeks.

It is important to note that skin irritation (such as itching, burning, or stinging) may occur during the first few weeks of Finacea treatment. This should improve; however, if it doesn’t, discontinue Finacea and consult your doctor. Also talk to your doctor if you have been using Finacea for four to eight weeks without seeing any improvement.

Other, nonpharmacological measures should be undertaken as well, such as avoiding triggers that may promote flushing or blushing, such as spicy or thermally hot food, and drinks such as coffee, tea, or alcohol.

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