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Kaletra FDA Alerts

The FDA Alert(s) below may be specifically about Kaletra or relate to a group or class of drugs which include Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir).

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings. For the latest FDA MedWatch alerts, go here.

Recent FDA Alert(s) for lopinavir/ritonavir

Victrelis (boceprevir) and Ritonavir-Boosted Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Protease Inhibitor Drugs: Drug Safety Communication - Drug Interactions

Apr 26, 2012

Audience: Infectious Disease, Pharmacy

[UPDATED 04/26/2012]

FDA notified healthcare professionals that the Victrelis drug label has been revised to state that co-administration of Victrelis (boceprevir), a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor, along with certain ritonavir-boosted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors, is not recommended. The findings of a drug-drug interaction study and clinical trial showed that co-administration increased of the possibility of reducing the effectiveness of the medicines, permitting the amount of HCV or HIV virus in the blood to increase. Ritonavir-boosted HIV protease inhibitors include ritonavir-boosted Reyataz (atazanavir), ritonavir-boosted Prezista (darunavir), and Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir).

 

[Posted 02/09/2012]

 

ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that drug interactions between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor Victrelis (boceprevir) and certain ritonavir-boosted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (atazanavir, lopinavir, darunavir) can potentially reduce the effectiveness of these medicines when they are used together.

A drug interaction study showed that taking boceprevir (Victrelis) with ritonavir (Norvir) in combination with atazanavir (Reyataz) or darunavir (Prezista), or with Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) reduced the blood levels of the HIV medicines and boceprevir in the body (see Data Summary below). FDA will be updating the Victrelis drug label to include information about these drug interactions.

BACKGROUND: Victrelis is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor used with the medicines peginterferon alfa and ribavirin to treat chronic (long-lasting) hepatitis C infection in adults. HIV protease inhibitors are a class of anti-viral drugs used to treat HIV infection. Ritonavir is an HIV protease inhibitor used to “boost” other HIV protease inhibitors, increasing their levels in the blood and making them more effective.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients should not stop taking any of their medicines without talking to their healthcare professional. Patients should contact their healthcare professional if they have any questions or concerns.

Healthcare professionals who have started patients infected with both chronic HCV and HIV on Victrelis and antiretroviral therapy containing a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor should closely monitor patients for HCV treatment response and for potential HCV and HIV virologic rebound. 

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

 

[04/26/2012 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

[04/20/2012 - Prescribing Information - Merck]

[02/09/2012 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

 

Victrelis (boceprevir) and Ritonavir-Boosted Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Protease Inhibitor Drugs: Drug Safety Communication - Drug Interactions

Feb 9, 2012

Audience: Infectious Disease, Pharmacy

[Posted 02/09/2012]

 

ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals and patients that drug interactions between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor Victrelis (boceprevir) and certain ritonavir-boosted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (atazanavir, lopinavir, darunavir) can potentially reduce the effectiveness of these medicines when they are used together.

A drug interaction study showed that taking boceprevir (Victrelis) with ritonavir (Norvir) in combination with atazanavir (Reyataz) or darunavir (Prezista), or with Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) reduced the blood levels of the HIV medicines and boceprevir in the body (see Data Summary below). FDA will be updating the Victrelis drug label to include information about these drug interactions.

BACKGROUND: Victrelis is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor used with the medicines peginterferon alfa and ribavirin to treat chronic (long-lasting) hepatitis C infection in adults. HIV protease inhibitors are a class of anti-viral drugs used to treat HIV infection. Ritonavir is an HIV protease inhibitor used to “boost” other HIV protease inhibitors, increasing their levels in the blood and making them more effective.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients should not stop taking any of their medicines without talking to their healthcare professional. Patients should contact their healthcare professional if they have any questions or concerns.

Healthcare professionals who have started patients infected with both chronic HCV and HIV on Victrelis and antiretroviral therapy containing a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor should closely monitor patients for HCV treatment response and for potential HCV and HIV virologic rebound. 

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

 

[02/09/2012 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir): Label Change - Serious Health Problems in Premature Babies

Mar 8, 2011

Audience: Infectious Disease

ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare professionals of serious health problems that have been reported in premature babies receiving Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) oral solution. Kaletra oral solution contains the ingredients alcohol and propylene glycol. Premature babies may be at increased risk for health problems because they have a decreased ability to eliminate propylene glycol; this could lead to adverse events such as serious heart, kidney, or breathing problems. Because the consequences of using Kaletra oral solution in babies immediately after birth can be severe or possibly fatal, the label is being revised to include a new warning.

BACKGROUND: Kaletra oral solution is an antiviral medication used in combination with other antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in pediatric patients 14 days of age (whether premature or full term) or older and in adults.

RECOMMENDATION: The use of Kaletra oral solution should be avoided in premature babies until 14 days after their due date, or in full-term babies younger than 14 days of age unless a healthcare professional believes that the benefit of using Kaletra oral solution to treat HIV infection immediately after birth outweighs the potential risks. In such cases, FDA strongly recommends monitoring for increases in serum osmolality, serum creatinine, and other signs of toxicity.


Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events, side effects, or product quality problems related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

 

[03/08/2011 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

    

Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) Oral Solution

Aug 14, 2007

Audience: Infectious disease specialists, pediatricians, pharmacists, other healthcare professionals

[Posted 08/14/2007] Abbott Laboratories disseminated a Dear Healthcare Provider Letter throughout the world to physicians and pharmacists that prescribe/distribute Kaletra Oral Solution. The letter informed healthcare professionals of an accidental overdose that occurred with a pediatric patient taking Kaletra Oral Solution. The infant received a significantly large dose of Kaletra and subsequently died. Healthcare professionals should pay special attention to accurate calculation of the dose of Kaletra, transcription of the medication order, dispensing information and dosing instructions to minimize the risk for medication errors.

[August 13, 2007 - Dear Healthcare Professional Letter - Abbott]

More Kaletra Resources