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Advil Liqui-Gels FDA Alerts

The FDA Alerts below may be specifically about Advil Liqui-Gels or relate to a group or class of drugs which include Advil Liqui-Gels.

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings.

Recent FDA Alerts for Advil Liqui-Gels

Drug Safety Communication: Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) - Avoid Use of NSAIDs in Pregnancy at 20 Weeks or Later

ISSUE: FDA is warning that use of NSAIDs around 20 weeks or later in pregnancy may cause rare but serious kidney problems in an unborn baby. This can lead to low levels of amniotic fluid surrounding the baby and possible complications.

For prescription NSAIDs, FDA is requiring changes to the prescribing information to describe the risk of kidney problems in unborn babies that result in low amniotic fluid.

For over-the-counter (OTC) NSAIDs intended for use in adults, FDA will also update the Drug Facts labels. These labels already warn to avoid using NSAIDs during the last 3 months of pregnancy because the medicines may cause problems in the unborn child or complications during delivery. The Drug Facts labels already advise pregnant and breastfeeding women to ask a health care professional before using these medicines.

BACKGROUND:

NSAIDs

  • are a class of medicines available by prescription and OTC. They are some of the most commonly used medicines for pain and fever.
  • are used to treat medical conditions such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, headaches, colds, and the flu.
  • work by blocking the production of certain chemicals in the body that cause inflammation.
  • are available alone and combined with other medicines. Examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, and celecoxib.

Common side effects of NSAIDs include: stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea, gas, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, and dizziness.

RECOMMENDATION:

Consumers/Patients

  • If you are pregnant, do not use NSAIDs at 20 weeks or later in pregnancy unless specifically advised to do so by your health care professional because these medicines may cause problems in your unborn baby.
  • Many OTC medicines contain NSAIDs, including those used for pain, colds, flu, and insomnia, so it is important to read the Drug Facts labels to find out if the medicines contain NSAIDs.
  • Talk to your health care professional or pharmacist if you have questions or concerns about NSAIDs or which medicines contain them.
  • Other medicines, such as acetaminophen, are available to treat pain and fever during pregnancy. Talk to your pharmacist or health care professional for help deciding which might be best.

Health Care Professionals

  • FDA recommends that health care professionals should limit prescribing NSAIDs between 20 to 30 weeks of pregnancy and avoid prescribing them after 30 weeks of pregnancy. If NSAID treatment is determined necessary, limit use to the lowest effective dose and shortest duration possible. Consider ultrasound monitoring of amniotic fluid if NSAID treatment extends beyond 48 hours and discontinue the NSAID if oligohydramnios is found. FDA is warning that use of NSAIDs around 20 weeks gestation or later in pregnancy may cause fetal renal dysfunction leading to oligohydramnios and, in some cases, neonatal renal impairment.
  • These adverse outcomes are seen, on average, after days to weeks of treatment, although oligohydramnios has been infrequently reported as soon as 48 hours after NSAID initiation.
  • Oligohydramnios is often, but not always, reversible with treatment discontinuation.
  • Complications of prolonged oligohydramnios may include limb contractures and delayed lung maturation. In some postmarketing cases of impaired neonatal renal function, invasive procedures such as exchange transfusion or dialysis were required.
  • If NSAID treatment is deemed necessary between 20 to 30 weeks of pregnancy, limit use to the lowest effective dose and shortest duration possible. As currently described in the NSAID labels, avoid prescribing NSAIDs at 30 weeks and later in pregnancy because of the additional risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus.
  • The above recommendations do not apply to low-dose 81 mg aspirin prescribed for certain conditions in pregnancy.
  • Consider ultrasound monitoring of amniotic fluid if NSAID treatment extends beyond 48 hours. Discontinue the NSAID if oligohydramnios occurs and follow up according to clinical practice.

Consumers, patients and health care professionals are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report online.
  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178.

[10/15/2020] - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

Source: FDA


Tris Pharma, Inc Expands Its Voluntary Nationwide Retail Recall of Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, Due to Higher Concentration of Ibuprofen

Monmouth Junction, NJ, Tris Pharma, Inc. is expanding the scope of its November 2018 recall by adding three (3) additional lots of Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, to the retail (pharmacy) level. Some units from these batches have been found to have higher levels of Ibuprofen concentration.

Infants already susceptible to the adverse effects of ibuprofen may be at a slightly higher risk if they receive medication from an impacted bottle. There is a remote probability that infants, who may be more susceptible to a higher potency level of drug, may be more vulnerable to permanent NSAID-associated renal injury. Some units from these six (6) lots have been found to contain Ibuprofen as high as 10% above the specified limit. Studies have shown that safety issues or toxicity is generally accepted to be a concern in infants at doses in excess of 700% of the recommended dose.1 To date, no serious adverse events have been reported related to this recall.

The product is used as a pain reliever/fever reducer and is packaged in ½ oz. and 1 oz. bottles. This voluntarily recall includes the six (6) lots listed below:

Lot No. NDC EXPIRATION DESCRIPTION COMPANY
4718 59779-925-23 12/19 CVS Health: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, in 0.5 oz. bottle CVS Pharmacy
00717005A 49035-125-24 02/19 Equate: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, in 1.0 oz. bottle Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
00717006A 59779-925-24

(Labeled as: 50428-1252-4)

02/19 CVS Health: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, in 1.0 oz. bottle CVS Pharmacy
00717009A
(Previously announced)
49035-125-23 02/19 Equate: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle Wal-Mart Stores Inc
00717015A
(Previously announced)
49035-125-23 04/19 Equate: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle Wal-Mart Stores Inc
00717024A
(Previously announced)
49035-125-23 08/19 Equate: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle Wal-Mart Stores Inc
59779-925-23 CVS Health: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops,
USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle
CVS Pharmacy
55319-250-23 Family Wellness: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops,
USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle
Family Dollar Services Inc.

Tris Pharma, Inc. manufactures Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP for a single customer, who markets and distributes the product to retailers. The retailers should stop further distribution of the affected lots, which are being recalled. Tris Pharma, Inc. has notified its customer by urgent recall notice and has arranged for the return of recalled products from retailers and distributors.

Consumers with questions regarding this recall may contact Tris Customer Service by 732-940-0358 (Monday through Friday, 8:00 AM ET- 5:00 PM PT) or via email at micc_tris@vigilarebp.com. Consumers, who may be concerned, should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.

Adverse reactions or quality problems experienced with the use of this product may be reported to the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online, by regular mail or by fax.

This recall is being conducted with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has approved a class II retail level recall for this recall,


Tris Pharma Issues Voluntary Nationwide Recall of Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP (NSAID) 50 mg per 1.25 mL, Due to Potential Higher Concentrations of Ibuprofen

December 5, 2018 -- Tris Pharma, Inc. has voluntarily recalled three (3) lots of Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP (NSAID) 50 mg per 1.25 mL, to the retail level. The recalled lots of the product have been found to potentially have higher concentrations of ibuprofen.

There is a remote possibility that infants, who may be more susceptible to a higher potency level of drug, and therefore may be more vulnerable to permanent NSAID-associated renal injury. Adverse effects that may be experienced are nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, or more rarely, diarrhea. Tinnitus, headache and gastrointestinal bleeding are also possible adverse effects. To date, Tris Pharma, Inc. has not received any reports of adverse events related to the lots of product that are the subject of this recall.

The product is used as a pain reliever/fever reducer and was packaged in 0.5 oz. bottles for the recalled lots listed below:

NDC; LOT; EXPIRATION; DESCRIPTION ; COMPANY;
49035-125-23 00717009A
00717015A
00717024A
02/19
04/19
08/19
Equate: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension,
USP (NSAID), 50 mg per 1.25 mL,
0.5 oz. bottle
Wal-Mart Stores Inc
59779-925-23 00717024A 08/19 CVS Health: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension,
USP (NSAID), 50 mg per 1.25 mL,
0.5 oz. bottle
CVS Pharmacy
55319-250-23 00717024A 08/19 Family Wellness: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension,
USP (NSAID), 50 mg per 1.25 mL,
0.5 oz. bottle
Family Dollar Services Inc.

Tris Pharma, Inc. sold the affected lots of Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP (NSAID) 50 mg per 1.25 mL to one customer, which distributed the lots into the US market. Tris Pharma, Inc. has notified its customer by urgent recall notice and is arranging for the return of the recalled product.

Wholesalers and retailers of the product should stop further distribution of the affected lots of Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP (NSAID) 50 mg per 1.25 mL, which are being recalled.

Consumers with questions regarding this recall can contact Tris Customer Service at 732-940-0358 (Monday through Friday, 8:00am ET- 5:00pm PT) or via email at Customer Service Email . Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.

Adverse reactions or quality problems associated with the use of this product may be reported to FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either by phone, on line, by regular mail or by fax.

This recall is being conducted with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

About Tris Pharma

Tris Pharma is a fully integrated pharmaceutical company focused on the development of innovative medicines that address unmet patient needs. Using its proprietary technology platform, LiquiXR®, Tris has pioneered the delivery of sustained release in the liquid, chewable, orally disintegrating tablet, and other dosage forms that benefits a wide variety of patients and their unique needs. Tris' Nobuse™ technology provides abuse deterrence for opioids and other abuse-prone drugs. Tris’ research, manufacturing and commercial facilities are located in Central New Jersey. For more information, please visit www.trispharma.com.

Source: FDA


Pfizer, Inc. Issues A Voluntary Nationwide Recall Of One Lot Of Children’s Advil® Suspension Bubble Gum Flavored 4 FL OZ Bottle

Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, a division of Pfizer Inc., is voluntarily recalling one lot of Children’s Advil® Suspension Bubble Gum Flavored 4 FL OZ Bottle because of customer complaints that the dosage cup provided is marked in teaspoons and the instructions on the label are described in milliliters (mL).

Pfizer concluded that the use of the product with an unmatched dosage cup marked in teaspoons rather than milliliters has a chance of being associated with potential overdose. The most common symptoms associated with ibuprofen overdose include nausea, vomiting, headache, drowsiness, blurred vision and dizziness.

Children’s Advil® Suspension Bubble Gum Flavored 4 FL OZ Bottle temporarily reduces fever, relieves minor aches and pains due to the common cold, flu, sore throat, headaches and toothaches.

Children’s Advil® Suspension Bubble Gum Flavored 4 FL OZ Bottle, NDC 0573-0207-30, lot R51129 was distributed nationwide to wholesalers, distributors and retailers in the United States from May 2018 through June 2018.

Lot and Packaging Information

NDC Lot
Number
Expiration Date SKU UPC Configuration/Count
0573-0207-30 R51129 11/20 F005730207300 3-0573-0207-30-0 4 FL OZ (120 ml)
Bottle
36 bottles/case

Pfizer, Inc. places the utmost emphasis on patient safety and product quality at every step in the manufacturing and supply chain process.

Pfizer, Inc. has notified wholesalers, distributors and retailers to arrange for return of any recalled product. Wholesalers, distributors and retailers with an existing inventory of the lot being recalled, should stop use and distribution and quarantine the product immediately. Wholesalers, distributors and retailers that have further distributed the recalled product should notify any accounts or additional locations which may have received the recalled product from them. For instructions on returning product or additional assistance, call Stericycle at 1-800-805-3093 between the hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday.

If consumers have questions regarding this recall or to report an adverse event, please contact the Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Information Line at 1-800-88-Advil (1-800-882-3845). Their hours of operation are Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm EST.

Consumers should contact their healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.

Adverse reactions or quality problems associated with the use of this product may be reported to FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either by phone, on line, by regular mail or by fax.

This recall is being executed with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.


Ibuprofen Lysine Injection, 20 mg /2 mL (10 mg/mL) by Exela Pharma Sciences: Recall - Particulate Matter

ISSUE: Exela Pharma Sciences, in association with marketer X-Gen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is voluntarily recalling lot number PLND1613 of Ibuprofen Lysine Injection, 20 mg /2 mL (10 mg/mL), vials to the hospital or user level. Some of the vials have been found to contain particulate matter.

Particulate matter has the potential to block blood vessels, provoke an immune reaction, and/or lead to microinfarcts which could be life threatening. Neither Exela nor X-Gen has received any reports of adverse events related to this recall.

BACKGROUND: Ibuprofen Lysine Injection is indicated to close a clinically significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in premature infants weighing between 500 and 1500 g, who are no more than 32 weeks gestational age when usual medical management is ineffective. The product is packaged in three 2 mL Single-Dose vials per carton.

  • NDC 39822-1030-2
  • Lot PLND1613
  • Expiration Date 02/2018

The product was distributed nationwide to wholesalers and distributors for further distribution to hospitals and retail customers.

RECOMMENDATION: X-Gen is notifying its distributors and customers by emails and fax communications and is arranging for return of all recalled products. Consumers/distributors/retailers that have the Ibuprofen Lysine Injection which is being recalled should stop using and return to their wholesaler/distributor, or to X-Gen or to Exela.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[02/08/2017 - Press Release - Exela Pharma Sciences]


Non-aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs): Drug Safety Communication - FDA Strengthens Warning of Increased Chance of Heart Attack or Stroke

[Posted 07/09/2015]

ISSUE:  FDA is strengthening an existing label warning that non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increase the chance of a heart attack or stroke. Based on FDAs comprehensive review of new safety information, FDA is requiring updates to the drug labels of all prescription NSAIDs. As is the case with current prescription NSAID labels, the Drug Facts labels of over-the-counter (OTC) non-aspirin NSAIDs already contain information on heart attack and stroke risk. FDA will also request updates to the OTC non-aspirin NSAID Drug Facts labels. See the FDA Drug Safety Communication (Table 1) for a list of non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug products.

Prescription NSAID labels will be revised to reflect the following information:

  • The risk of heart attack or stroke can occur as early as the first weeks of using an NSAID. The risk may increase with longer use of the NSAID.
  • The risk appears greater at higher doses.
  • It was previously thought that all NSAIDs may have a similar risk. Newer information makes it less clear that the risk for heart attack or stroke is similar for all NSAIDs; however, this newer information is not sufficient for us to determine that the risk of any particular NSAID is definitely higher or lower than that of any other particular NSAID.
  • NSAIDs can increase the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with or without heart disease or risk factors for heart disease. A large number of studies support this finding, with varying estimates of how much the risk is increased, depending on the drugs and the doses studied.
  • In general, patients with heart disease or risk factors for it have a greater likelihood of heart attack or stroke following NSAID use than patients without these risk factors because they have a higher risk at baseline.
  • Patients treated with NSAIDs following a first heart attack were more likely to die in the first year after the heart attack compared to patients who were not treated with NSAIDs after their first heart attack.
  • There is an increased risk of heart failure with NSAID use.

BACKGROUND: The risk of heart attack and stroke with NSAIDs, either of which can lead to death, was first described in 2005 in the Boxed Warning and Warnings and Precautions sections of the prescription drug labels. Since then, FDA reviewed a variety of new safety information on prescription and OTC NSAIDs, including observational studies, a large combined analysis of clinical trials, and other scientific publications. These studies were also discussed at a joint meeting of the Arthritis Advisory Committee and Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee held on February 10-11, 2014.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients and health care professionals should remain alert for heart-related side effects the entire time that NSAIDs are being taken. Patients taking NSAIDs should seek medical attention immediately if they experience symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath or trouble breathing, weakness in one part or side of their body, or slurred speech.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[07/09/2015 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

[07/09/2015 - Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) - FDA]


Prescription and Over-the-Counter (OTC) Pain Medicines: Drug Safety Communication - FDA Review of Possible Risks of Pain Medicine Use During Pregnancy

[Posted 01/09/2015]

ISSUE:  FDA is aware of and understands the concerns arising from recent reports questioning the safety of prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) pain medicines when used during pregnancy. As a result, FDA evaluated research studies published in the medical literature and determined they are too limited to make any recommendations based on these studies at this time. Because of this uncertainty, the use of pain medicines during pregnancy should be carefully considered. FDA urges pregnant women to always discuss all medicines with their health care professionals before using them.

Severe and persistent pain that is not effectively treated during pregnancy can result in depression, anxiety, and high blood pressure in the mother. Medicines including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and acetaminophen can help treat severe and persistent pain. However, it is important to carefully weigh the benefits and risks of using prescription and OTC pain medicines during pregnancy. 

BACKGROUND: The published studies FDA reviewed reported on the potential risks associated with the following three types of pain medicines used during pregnancy. See the FDA Drug Safety Communication Data Summary section for more information about these studies.

RECOMMENDATION: Healthcare professionals should talk with each patient about the benefits and risks of analgesic use during pregnancy, which may differ among patients and by treatment indication. Continue to follow the existing recommendations in current drug labels regarding the use of analgesics during pregnancy.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[01/09/2015 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]


Ibuprofen and Oxcarbazepine Tablets by American Health Packaging: Recall - Mislabeled Packaging

ISSUE: American Health Packaging (AHP) voluntarily recalled Lot #142588, Expiration Date, 01/2016 of Ibuprofen Tablets, USP, 600 mg, in a hospital unit dose presentation that may contain individual blistered doses labeled as Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg, lot #142544. In addition, AHP voluntarily recalled Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg, lot #142544, Expiration Date, 02/2016. This recall is the result of mislabeled inner unit dose blister packaging which could result in patients receiving ibuprofen and missing their scheduled dose of oxcarbazepine. Failure to receive the proper dose of oxcarbazepine could increase the chances of having a seizure. Inadvertent consumption of ibuprofen may cause adverse reactions in a number of patients in which use of ibuprofen is contraindicated

BACKGROUND: Oxcarbazepine is used for treating certain types of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

Cartons of 100 count (10x10) Hospital Unit Dose blisters of AHP Ibuprofen Tablets, USP, 600 mg, with outer carton NDC#: 68084-703-01 and individual dose NDC#: 68084-703-11, Lot #142588, Expiration Date, 01/2016. The drug product can be identified by physical description: white, oval-shaped, film-coated tablets, with IP 465 printed on one side.

Cartons of 100 count (10x10) Hospital Unit Dose blisters of AHP Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg, with outer carton NDC#: 62584-143-0 and individual dose NDC#: 62584-143-11, Lot #142544, Expiration Date, 02/2016. The drug product can be identified by physical description: yellow color, capsule shaped, film-coated tablets scored and debossed with '1 84' on one side and scored on other side.

These hospital unit dose products were distributed nationwide beginning June 20, 2014

RECOMMENDATION: Notification of the recall has been sent to distributors who received the affected product with instructions on how to notify their customers.

Consumers who have received the recalled product should immediately discontinue use and contact GENCO Pharmaceutical Services at 855-419-4608 from 7am to 5pm CST for instructions on returning the recalled product.

For medical information questions or product complaints related to Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg or Ibuprofen Tablets, USP, 600 mg please contact American Health Packaging customer service at 1-800-707-4621 from 8am to 4pm EST.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[07/21/2014 - Press Release - American Health Packaging]


Ibuprofen (Unapproved) topical drug products

FDA informed consumers and healthcare professionals of its intent to take action against eight companies that market unlawful over-the-counter (OTC) topical drug products containing the pain reliever ibuprofen.  The products, which contain ibuprofen in combination with a variety of other active ingredients and are marketed for pain relief, are unapproved new drugs that require an approved new drug application in order to be legally marketed. Orally administered ibuprofen has been approved as a safe and effective treatment for pain and inflammation. There are no approved applications for topical ibuprofen products. Topical ibuprofen is often promoted as a "safer" alternative that can be used in place of oral ibuprofen because of certain side effects, such as stomach ulcers and cardiovascular effects that are associated with prolonged use of oral ibuprofen.  However, these safety claims for topical ibuprofen have not been reviewed by the FDA, nor has the agency evaluated what side effects might be associated with such products. 

The names of the products and manufacturers that received warning letters are: 
Emuprofen (Progressive Emu, Inc.)
BioEntopic 15% Ibuprofen Creme (BioCentric Laboratories, Inc.)
Ibunex Topical Ibuprofen (Core Products International, Inc.)
LoPain AF 15% Ibuprofen Creme (Geromatrix Health Products)
IB-RELIEF (MEKT LLC)
Profen HP (Ridge Medical Products)
IbuPRO-10 Plus (Meditrend, Inc. dba Progena Professional Formulations)
IBU-RELIEF 12 (Wonder Laboratories)

[08/20/2009 - FDA NEWS Release - FDA]

    

Ibuprofen and Aspirin Taken Together

[Posted 09/08/2006] FDA notified consumers and healthcare professionals that taking Ibuprofen for pain relief and aspirin at the same time may interfere with the benefits of aspirin taken for the heart. Ibuprofen can interfere with the anti-platelet effect of low dose aspirin (81 mg per day), that may render aspirin less effective when used for cardioprotection and stroke prevention. Although it is all right to use Ibuprofen and aspirin together, FDA recommends that consumers contact their healthcare professional for more information on the timing of when to take these two medicines, so that both medicines can be effective.

[September 8, 2006 - Healthcare Professional Sheet - FDA]
[September 8, 2006 - Drug Information Page - FDA]

COX-2 Selective and Non-Selective Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

After concluding that the overall risk versus benefit profile is unfavorable, FDA has requested Pfizer, Inc. to voluntarily withdraw Bextra (valdecoxib) from the market. This request is based on:

* The lack of adequate data on the cardiovascular safety of long-term use of Bextra, along with the increased risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in short-term coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) trials that FDA believes may be relevant to chronic use.

* Reports of serious and potentially life-threatening skin reactions, including deaths, in patients using Bextra. The risk of these reactions in individual patients is unpredictable, occurring in patients with and without a prior history of sulfa allergy, and after both short- and long-term use.

* Lack of any demonstrated advantages for Bextra compared with other NSAIDs.

Patients currently taking Bextra should contact their physicians to consider alternative treatments. FDA is also asking manufacturers of all marketed prescription NSAIDs, including Celebrex (celecoxib), a COX-2 selective NSAID, to revise the labeling (package insert) for their products to include a boxed warning and a Medication Guide. The boxed warning will highlight the potential for increased risk of CV events with these drugs and the well-described, serious, and potentially life-threatening gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with their use. The Medication Guide will accompany every prescription NSAID at the time it is dispensed to better inform patients about the CV and GI risks. Finally, FDA is asking manufacturers of non-prescription (OTC) NSAIDs to revise their labeling to include more specific information about the potential GI and CV risks, and information to assist consumers in the safe use of the drug. This announcement does not apply to aspirin as it has clearly been shown to reduce the risk of serious adverse CV events in certain patient populations.

[April 07, 2005 - Public Health Advisory - FDA]
[April 07, 2005 - Drug Information Page - FDA]
[April 07, 2005 - Questions and Answers - FDA]


COX-2 Selective and Non-Selective Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

After concluding that the overall risk versus benefit profile is unfavorable, FDA has requested Pfizer, Inc. to voluntarily withdraw Bextra (valdecoxib) from the market. This request is based on:

* The lack of adequate data on the cardiovascular safety of long-term use of Bextra, along with the increased risk of adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in short-term coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) trials that FDA believes may be relevant to chronic use.

* Reports of serious and potentially life-threatening skin reactions, including deaths, in patients using Bextra. The risk of these reactions in individual patients is unpredictable, occurring in patients with and without a prior history of sulfa allergy, and after both short- and long-term use.

* Lack of any demonstrated advantages for Bextra compared with other NSAIDs.

Patients currently taking Bextra should contact their physicians to consider alternative treatments. FDA is also asking manufacturers of all marketed prescription NSAIDs, including Celebrex (celecoxib), a COX-2 selective NSAID, to revise the labeling (package insert) for their products to include a boxed warning and a Medication Guide. The boxed warning will highlight the potential for increased risk of CV events with these drugs and the well-described, serious, and potentially life-threatening gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding associated with their use. The Medication Guide will accompany every prescription NSAID at the time it is dispensed to better inform patients about the CV and GI risks. Finally, FDA is asking manufacturers of non-prescription (OTC) NSAIDs to revise their labeling to include more specific information about the potential GI and CV risks, and information to assist consumers in the safe use of the drug. This announcement does not apply to aspirin as it has clearly been shown to reduce the risk of serious adverse CV events in certain patient populations.

[April 07, 2005 - Public Health Advisory - FDA]
[April 07, 2005 - Drug Information Page - FDA]
[April 07, 2005 - Questions and Answers - FDA]


OTC pain and fever reducers (acetaminophen / NSAIDs)

The FDA notified healthcare professionals of a national education campaign to provide advice on the safe use of over-the-counter (OTC) pain and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The campaign is intended to raise consumer awareness of these safety issues and to inform healthcare providers about the role that they can play in preventing acetaminophen induced hepatotoxicity and NSAID-related gastrointestinal bleeding and renal toxicity in patients using these medicines.

[January 22, 2004 Drug Information Page - FDA]
[January 22, 2004 Science Backgrounder - FDA]
[January 22, 2004 Letter to State Boards of Pharmacy - FDA]
[January 22, 2004 Press Release - FDA]

More Advil Liqui-Gels Resources