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Medications for Zaire Ebolavirus Infection

Other names: Ebola; Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever; Ebola Virus Disease; Ebola Zaire Disease; EVD

Zaire Ebolavirus Infection or Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a severe, acute, and often fatal viral illness characterized by fever, fatigue, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding.

Ebola was first discovered in Africa in 1976, with fruit bats of the Pteropodidae family considered the natural hosts of the virus. The virus can be transmitted to humans through close contact with infected wild animals (fruit bats, monkeys, apes, forest antelope, or porcupines) and can spread from human-to-human via direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes).

There are six species of Ebolavirus: Zaire, Bundibugyo, Sudan, Taï Forest, Reston and Bombali. The most recent outbreaks of Ebola in West Africa (2014–2016) and Democratic Republic of the Congo (2018-2019) were caused by Zaire ebolavirus.

Until recently, there were no approved vaccines or treatments for Zaire ebolavirus infection, with supportive care, and treatment for medical complications the only available options.

The first Ebola vaccine was approved by the FDA in December 2019. Ervebo (Ebola Zaire Vaccine, Live) is used for the prevention of disease caused by Zaire ebolavirus in adults. Ervebo does not protect against other species of Ebolavirus.

The first Ebola treatment was approved by the FDA in October 2020. Inmazeb (atoltivimab, maftivimab, and odesivimab-ebgn) is a monoclonal antibody combination for the treatment of infection caused by Zaire ebolavirus in adults and children, including newborns of mothers who have tested positive for the virus.

Drugs used to treat Zaire Ebolavirus Infection

The following list of medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of this condition.

Drug name Rating Reviews Activity ? Rx/OTC Pregnancy CSA Alcohol
atoltivimab / maftivimab / odesivimab Rate Add review
Rx U

Generic name: atoltivimab / maftivimab / odesivimab systemic

Brand name:  Inmazeb

For consumers:

For professionals: AHFS DI Monograph

Inmazeb Rate Add review
Rx U

Generic name: atoltivimab / maftivimab / odesivimab systemic

For consumers: dosage,

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Ebanga Rate Add review
Rx U

Generic name: ansuvimab systemic

For consumers: dosage,

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Legend

Rating For ratings, users were asked how effective they found the medicine while considering positive/adverse effects and ease of use (1 = not effective, 10 = most effective).
Activity Activity is based on recent site visitor activity relative to other medications in the list.
Rx Prescription Only.
OTC Over the Counter.
Rx/OTC Prescription or Over the Counter.
Off-label This medication may not be approved by the FDA for the treatment of this condition.
EUA An Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) allows the FDA to authorize unapproved medical products or unapproved uses of approved medical products to be used in a declared public health emergency when there are no adequate, approved, and available alternatives.
Pregnancy Category
A Adequate and well-controlled studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in the first trimester of pregnancy (and there is no evidence of risk in later trimesters).
B Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.
C Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
D There is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
X Studies in animals or humans have demonstrated fetal abnormalities and/or there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience, and the risks involved in use in pregnant women clearly outweigh potential benefits.
N FDA has not classified the drug.
Controlled Substances Act (CSA) Schedule
M The drug has multiple schedules. The schedule may depend on the exact dosage form or strength of the medication.
U CSA Schedule is unknown.
N Is not subject to the Controlled Substances Act.
1 Has a high potential for abuse. Has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. There is a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.
2 Has a high potential for abuse. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions. Abuse may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.
3 Has a potential for abuse less than those in schedules 1 and 2. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence.
4 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 3. It has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 3.
5 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 4. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 4.
Alcohol
X Interacts with Alcohol.

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Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.