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Earache

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

What causes an earache?

An earache can be caused by a problem within your ear. A problem or condition in another body area can also cause pain that travels to your ear. An earache can be caused by any of the following:

  • Infection of the inner or outer ear
  • Earwax buildup, or small objects put into your ear
  • Ear injury caused by a cotton swab or by air pressure changes from a plane ride or scuba diving
  • Other infections, such as tonsillitis or pharyngitis
  • Jaw or dental problems such as cavities or TMJ
  • Neck pain caused by problems such as arthritis in your upper spine

How is an earache diagnosed?

Your healthcare provider will examine your ears, head, neck, and mouth. He will also ask you to describe your symptoms. You may also receive any of the following:

  • Audiometry is a test used to check for hearing loss. Your healthcare provider will play sounds at different volumes to check how much you can hear.
  • Tympanometry is a test used to check pressure changes that may be a sign of problems with your inner ear.

How is an earache treated?

  • NSAIDs , such as ibuprofen, help decrease swelling, pain, and fever. This medicine is available with or without a doctor's order. NSAIDs can cause stomach bleeding or kidney problems in certain people. If you take blood thinner medicine, always ask if NSAIDs are safe for you. Always read the medicine label and follow directions. Do not give these medicines to children under 6 months of age without direction from your child's healthcare provider.
  • Acetaminophen decreases pain and fever. It is available without a doctor's order. Ask how much to take and how often to take it. Follow directions. Acetaminophen can cause liver damage if not taken correctly.

When should I seek immediate care?

  • You have a severe earache.
  • You have ear pain with itching, hearing loss, dizziness, a feeling of fullness in your ear, or ringing in your ears.

When should I contact my healthcare provider?

  • Your ear pain worsens or does not go away with treatment.
  • You have drainage from your ear.
  • You have a fever.
  • Your outer ear becomes red, swollen, and warm.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Care Agreement

You have the right to help plan your care. Learn about your health condition and how it may be treated. Discuss treatment options with your caregivers to decide what care you want to receive. You always have the right to refuse treatment. The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

© 2016 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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