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Bullying toward You

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Jul 7, 2024.

What is bullying?

Bullying is a pattern of abuse designed to harm or control another person. Verbal bullying means the person is calling you names, using words to hurt you, or threatening to hurt you. Physical bullying means the person is hitting you or attacking you physically. Social abuse includes anything designed to keep you from being accepted by others. An example is starting rumors about you. Bullying that happens through e-mail, the Internet, or text messages is called cyberbullying.

What increases my risk for being bullied?

Anyone can be the target of bullying. Some children who bully will target children who are smaller. You may be quiet or not have a large amount of friends. You may still be bullied even if you are tall and friendly. The bullying is not your fault. You may think you did something to deserve being bullied, but bullying is never okay. If you are being bullied, it is important to tell someone right away.

What problems may I develop from bullying?

What are the risks of being bullied?

You may develop poor self-esteem. You may become depressed or want to drop out of school. Bullying can increase your risk for a drug or alcohol addiction. Bullying can lead to thoughts of suicide.

What can I do to stop the bullying?

Care Agreement

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Further information

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