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Abuse of Alcohol

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Alcohol abuse means you drink more than the recommended daily or weekly limits. You may be drinking alcohol regularly or drinking large amounts in a short period of time (binge drinking). You continue to drink even though it causes legal, work, or relationship problems.

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Call your local emergency number (911 in the US) for any of the following:

  • You have sudden chest pain or trouble breathing.
  • You want to harm yourself or others.
  • You have a seizure or have shaking or trembling.

Call your doctor if:

  • You have hallucinations (you see or hear things that are not real).
  • You cannot stop vomiting or you vomit blood.
  • You need help to stop drinking alcohol.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Medicines:

  • Vitamin supplements may be given to treat low vitamin levels. Alcohol can make it hard for your body to absorb enough vitamins such as B1. Vitamin supplements may also be given to prevent alcohol related brain damage.
  • Take your medicine as directed. Contact your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him or her if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Health problems alcohol abuse can cause:

  • Cancer in your liver, pancreas, stomach, colon, kidney, or breast
  • Stroke or a heart attack
  • Liver, kidney, or lung disease
  • Blackouts, memory loss, brain damage, or dementia
  • Diabetes, immune system problems, or thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency
  • Problems for you and your baby if you drink while pregnant

Recommended alcohol limits:

  • Men 21 to 64 years should limit alcohol to 2 drinks a day. Do not have more than 4 drinks in 1 day or more than 14 in 1 week.
  • All women, and men 65 or older should limit alcohol to 1 drink in a day. Do not have more than 3 drinks in 1 day or more than 7 in 1 week. No amount of alcohol is okay during pregnancy.

Manage alcohol use:

  • Decrease the amount you drink. This can help prevent health problems such as brain, heart, and liver damage, high blood pressure, diabetes, and cancer. If you cannot stop completely, healthcare providers can help you set goals to decrease the amount you drink.
  • Plan weekly alcohol use. You will be less likely to drink more than the recommended limit if you plan ahead.
  • Have food when you drink alcohol. Food will prevent alcohol from getting into your system too quickly. Eat before you have your first alcohol drink.
  • Time your drinks carefully. Have no more than 1 drink in an hour. Have a liquid such as water, coffee, or a soft drink between alcohol drinks.
  • Do not drive if you have had alcohol. Make sure someone who has not been drinking can help you get home.
  • Do not drink alcohol if you are taking medicine. Alcohol is dangerous when you combine it with certain medicines, such as acetaminophen or blood pressure medicine. Talk to your healthcare provider about all the medicines you currently take.

Follow up with your healthcare provider as directed:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

For support and more information:

  • Alcoholics Anonymous
    Web Address: http://www.aa.org
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    PO Box 2345
    Rockville , MD 20847-2345
    Web Address: http://www.samhsa.gov

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The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

Learn more about Abuse of Alcohol (Aftercare Instructions)

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Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.