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Suicide Risk Quadruples After Lung Cancer Diagnosis

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – People with lung cancer have a strikingly higher-than-normal risk of suicide, a new study finds. While a cancer diagnosis on its own significantly raises the risk of suicide, the study found that a lung cancer diagnosis raised the odds of suicide by over four times compared to people in the general population. "A cancer diagnosis is an overwhelming diagnosis for patients psychologically and emotionally," explained study senior author Dr. Jeffrey Port. "It is a very tough diagnosis for patients to manage, and there is a higher suicide rate," he added. Port is a professor of cardiothoracic surgery at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. The study included data from over 3 million patients during a 40-year period. Cancer diagnoses were linked to over 6,600 suicides. Although the study wasn't designed to prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Dysthymia, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Sleep Apnea May Boost Odds of Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 – People with sleep apnea may be more likely to develop the abnormal heart rhythm atrial fibrillation, especially if the oxygen level in their blood drops below normal, Canadian researchers report. Sleep apnea, which obstructs breathing, causes people to wake many times during the night to start breathing again. It's possible, researchers said, that disrupted sleep along with a drop in the level of oxygen in the blood might lead to atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation causes a rapid and irregular heartbeat. This can lead to stroke and heart problems. "Patients who are at risk for obstructive sleep apnea should undergo testing, particularly if they have other cardiac risk factors," said study senior researcher Dr. Richard Leung, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Toronto. "Therapy should be strongly considered for patients who have ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, Atrial Fibrillation, Smoking Cessation, Sleep Apnea, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Could 'Safer' Filtered Cigarettes Be More Deadly?

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 – Filtered cigarettes might be even more lethal than unfiltered ones, and a new review suggests that they have been boosting rates of a cancer that takes root deep in the lungs. The findings have prompted the review authors to call for federal regulators to ban the use of ventilation holes in cigarette filters. "Modern cigarettes are more risky when it comes to lung cancer," said review co-author Dr. Peter Shields. He is deputy director with the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Ohio State University. "The design of cigarette filters that have ventilation can make the cigarettes even more dangerous because those holes can change how the tobacco burns, allowing smokers to inhale more smoke and think that the smoke is safer because it is smoother," Shields explained. The tobacco industry has embraced filters for over 50 years, often touting them as "light" cigarettes ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

Health Tip: Is Your Lifestyle Raising Blood Pressure?

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

-- If your blood pressure seems to rise continually, you should take a careful look at your lifestyle. Here are habits you can change, suggested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Eating too many foods high in salt and low in potassium. Getting insufficient physical activity. Being obese, which also increases your risks for high cholesterol, heart disease and diabetes. Drinking too much alcohol. Women should limit consumption to one daily drink, and men should hold the line at two daily drinks. Smoking cigarettes. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Many Under 40 May Not Need Regular Cholesterol Checks: Study

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 – Many adults under 40 may not need to have routine cholesterol screenings, a new study suggests. To come to this conclusion, the researchers looked at the real world implications of two conflicting sets of guidelines on cholesterol testing. One, from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA), says that all adults older than 20 should have a cholesterol screening. They also suggest a repeat test every four to six years. The other guidelines come from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a government-funded, independent panel of medical experts. They say many adults can go longer before their first cholesterol test – until age 35 for men, and age 45 for women. The exception would be people with a major risk factor for heart problems – such as high blood pressure, smoking or a family history of early heart disease. Those patients ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, Heart Attack, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

E-Cigarettes Linked to Bladder Cancer Risk

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 – Although many people think "vaping" is safer than smoking, research suggests that both e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes are tied to an increased risk for bladder cancer. "We've known traditional smoking raises bladder cancer risk, and given the surge in popularity of e-cigarettes, it's imperative we uncover any potential links" between e-cigarettes and bladder cancer, Dr. Sam Chang said in an American Urological Association news release. Chang is a professor of urologic surgery at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville. Most inhaled nicotine is excreted in the urine. For the study, the researchers compared the urine of people who use e-cigarettes with that of nonsmokers. The investigators looked for five chemicals known to cause bladder cancer and may be found in e-cigarette liquid. Ninety-two percent of e-cigarette users tested positive for two of ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Bladder Cancer, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Urothelial Carcinoma, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

Speed Is Key When a Stroke Strikes

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 12, 2017 – Every 40 seconds someone in America has a stroke. But fast action and quick treatment can save lives and reduce disability. "Stroke statistics are alarming. It's the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and the leading cause of serious adult disabilities," said Dr. Randolph Marshall, chief of the stroke division at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. "The most effective method in saving a stroke victim's life is to diagnose and treat immediately after a stroke occurs," said Dr. Matthew Fink, neurologist-in-chief at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. Both hospitals are in New York City. "Strokes kill nearly 133,000 people a year. The good news is that approximately 80 percent of strokes can be prevented," Marshall said in a NewYork-Presbyterian news release. As part of Stroke Awareness Month, the two experts ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Ischemic Stroke, Smoking Cessation, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage

What Harms the Young Heart Also Hurts the Brain Later

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 – High blood pressure, elevated cholesterol or a smoking habit early in life increases your odds for mental decline during middle age, a new study warns. "While it is well known that high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking are associated with poor cognitive [mental] performance in adults, the effects of these risk factors from childhood on midlife cognition were unknown," study lead author Suvi Rovio said in a news release from the American College of Cardiology. "These findings support the need for active monitoring and treatment strategies against cardiovascular risk factors from childhood," said Rovio, a senior scientist at the University of Turku, in Finland. For the study, Rovio and colleagues analyzed data from thousands of people in Finland who were followed from childhood to adulthood. The investigators found that high blood pressure and high ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Psychiatric Disorders, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Just a 'Social Smoker'? Toll on Your Health Still High

Posted 5 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 5, 2017 – If you think that having an occasional cigarette in social settings is less dangerous for your heart than smoking a pack a day, think again. New research shows that social smokers have the same risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol as regular smokers do. "Not smoking at all is the best way to go. Even smoking in a social situation is detrimental to your cardiovascular health," said study author Kate Gawlik, an assistant professor of clinical nursing at Ohio State University. "One in 10 people in this study said they sometimes smoke, and many of them are young and already on the path to heart disease," she added in a university news release. The researchers surveyed nearly 40,000 people in the United States and found that more than 10 percent were social smokers – meaning they don't smoke every day – while 17 percent were regular smokers. Among both ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Could Smoking in Pregnancy Affect a Grandkid's Autism Risk?

Posted 27 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 27, 2017 – When a woman chooses to stop smoking during her pregnancy, the potential effects to her baby are probably on her mind. But a new British study hints that smoking in pregnancy could even affect the health of a woman's grandchildren – specifically, their risk for autism. "We already know that protecting a baby from tobacco smoke is one of the best things a woman can do to give her child a healthy start in life," said study co-author Jean Golding of the University of Bristol. "Now we've found that not smoking during pregnancy could also give their future grandchildren a better start, too." The study can't prove cause-and-effect, but one U.S. autism expert who reviewed the findings said the researchers' conclusion is not farfetched. While the finding is new, "the mechanism by which it might be occurring has been a focus of study for half a decade," noted Alycia ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Higher Illicit Pot Use in States That OK Medical Marijuana: Study

Posted 26 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 – An unintended byproduct of medical marijuana laws could be a sharper increase in illicit pot use, a new U.S. study reports. Illicit pot use increased significantly more in states that passed medical marijuana laws compared to other states, researchers found in comparing three national surveys conducted between 1991 and 2013. States with medical marijuana laws also saw an increase in people who can't stop using pot even though it's interfering with many aspects of their lives, researchers said. This is known as cannabis use disorder. These laws "seem to send a message that use of this drug is safe and acceptable in some way," said lead researcher Deborah Hasin of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. With this implicit message, more people feel free to use pot as they would alcohol, as a means to relax or to cope with problems like anxiety or ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Substance Abuse, Cannabis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

The Top 5 Conditions That Shorten Americans' Lives -- And Are Preventable

Posted 24 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – More bad news for plus-sized Americans: Obesity is the leading cause of preventable life-years lost in the nation, a new study finds. Obesity steals more years than diabetes, tobacco, high blood pressure and high cholesterol – the other top preventable health problems that cut Americans' lives short, according to researchers who analyzed 2014 data. "Modifiable behavioral risk factors pose a substantial mortality burden in the U.S.," said study lead author Glen Taksler, an internal medicine researcher at the Cleveland Clinic. "These preliminary results continue to highlight the importance of weight loss, diabetes management and healthy eating in the U.S. population," Taksler said in a clinic news release. Obesity was linked with as much as 47 percent more life-years lost than tobacco, his team said. Tobacco, meanwhile, had the same effect on life span as high ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

For the Young, Cigarettes Go Better With Booze Than Pot

Posted 19 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 – At parties across America, young adult smokers are more likely to pair cigarettes with alcohol than with a "joint." "Our findings show that co-use of cigarettes and alcohol could be more pleasurable than co-use of cigarettes and marijuana," co-first author Noah Gubner, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, San Francisco's Institute for Health Policy Studies, said in a school news release. The results could also point the way to better efforts to help young adults stop all unhealthy habits, the researchers added. "Smoking cessation interventions should highlight these differences and address co-use to effectively help people cope with triggers to smoke," added co-first author Johannes Thrul, a postdoctoral scholar at the UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. For the study, researchers surveyed more than 500 smokers in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Nicotine, Alcoholism, Cannabis, Hangover, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Nicotrol Inhaler, Commit, Habitrol, Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS, Nicotrol NS, ProStep

Pot Ingredient Might Ease Severe Epilepsy

Posted 19 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 – An ingredient in marijuana may reduce seizures in people with a severe form of epilepsy, a new study suggests. The ingredient in question is cannabidiol – a molecule from the marijuana plant that does not create a "high." The drug is being developed by GW Pharmaceuticals, which funded the new study. Researchers used cannabidiol to treat a type of epilepsy known as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. "The seizures in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome can be very difficult to treat, and the ones that cause falling can be dangerous and occur multiple times in a day," explained an expert in epilepsy treatment, Dr. Derek Chong. He directs the division of epilepsy at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. The new study was led by Dr. Anup Patel, of Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus. His team tested cannabidiol in 225 young ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Smoking, Epilepsy, Smoking Cessation, Seizure Prevention, Cannabis, Seizure Prophylaxis, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Pot Smoking Common Among Pregnant Teens: Survey

Posted 17 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 17, 2017 – Adding to concerns about the harms of teenage pregnancy are new U.S. survey results that show 14 percent of teenage mothers-to-be smoke marijuana. This large national survey found that more than twice as many pregnant 12- to 17-year-olds use marijuana as their nonpregnant peers. And significantly more use the drug than pregnant women in their 20s, said Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Evidence regarding pot's effects on the developing fetus is limited, but the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that pregnant women stop using the drug. "Some of the studies that do exist suggest that there are risks to the pregnancy from pot use," said Dr. Judy Chang, associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. Those risks include "scrawnier ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Delivery, Cannabis, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

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