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Sleep Disorders News

Health Tip: Stress Can Impact Sleep

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Too much stress may make it difficult to fall asleep or stay that way. The National Sleep Foundation says your body may be offering clues that there's too much stress in your life. Among them: Your mind continues to race after your head hits the pillow. You have muscle tension and pain. Your heart races. If insomnia is chronic, it may increase your chances of developing stress-related headaches. The foundation suggests developing a relaxing pre-sleep ritual. Examples include drinking a calming tea, taking a warm bath or practicing breathing exercises or yoga. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue

Here's Why You 'Space Out' After Too Little Sleep

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – Ever notice that too little sleep at night can cause you to "space out" the next day? New research suggests that a lack of sleep hampers communication between brain cells, causing temporary mental errors that affect memory and visual perception. That can lead to problems ranging from minor ones such as forgetting your keys when you leave the house, to more serious consequences such as lack of awareness while driving. "We discovered that starving the body of sleep also robs neurons [brain cells] of the ability to function properly. This leads to [mental] lapses in how we perceive and react to the world around us," said study senior author Dr. Itzhak Fried, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of California, Los Angeles and Tel Aviv University in Israel. Fried added that severe fatigue "exerts a similar influence on the brain to drinking too much. Yet no ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Shift Work Sleep Disorder

Health Tip: Travel With a Blanket

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Whether you are in a car, plane or train, maintaining the right body temperature can help you get needed rest. So don't forget to include a blanket on your list of essentials to pack, the National Sleep Foundation says. Maintaining the right body temperature will help you fall asleep and stay asleep, the organization says. The blanket should be large enough to cover your feet, but small enough to fit in a bag. The fabric should feel cozy and be easy to wash. And use the same blanket each time. The familiarity of the same blanket should condition you to fall asleep faster. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Jet Lag

Helping Children Cope When a Mass Tragedy Strikes

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 – Mass slayings, like the church shooting in Texas Sunday that left at least 26 dead, are hard enough for adults to comprehend. For children, these tragedies can make the world seem like a terrifying place. In the wake of such bloodshed, a New Jersey family physician offers guidance to parents trying to help children manage their fears. Start by shielding your kids from the news reports, suggested Dr. Jennifer Caudle, an associate professor at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford. "Children may become upset by news coverage," Caudle said. So monitor and limit what they see, hear or read. This may reduce their anxiety and help them deal with these unsettling events, she explained. The Sutherland Springs, Texas, massacre was just the latest in a series of recent mass killings in the United States. In New York City on Halloween, a terrorist ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Nightmares, Night Terrors

Bad Hot Flashes, Sleep Apnea Often Go Together

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1, 2017 – As if severe hot flashes alone weren't enough of a problem for menopausal women, a new study finds these symptoms may also be tied to a greater risk for sleep apnea and related heart issues. The study included nearly 1,700 middle-aged women, about 25 percent of whom were at intermediate or high risk for obstructive sleep apnea – for instance, they generally were older, had higher levels of body fat and had high blood pressure. Compared with women who had mild or no hot flashes, those who reported severe hot flashes were nearly twice as likely to have obstructive sleep apnea, the researchers found. In sleep apnea, pauses in breathing or shallow breathing prevent a person from getting a good night's sleep. Sleep apnea has been linked to a significantly increased risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, depression and early death, the study authors ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Hot Flashes, Menopausal Disorders, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Vaginal Dryness

Health Tip: Sleep Train Your Baby

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Young infants need 12 to 15 hours of sleep a day, the National Sleep Foundation says. Ideally, those hours are consecutive. After your infant reaches 4 months or so, you can train baby to sleep at night and not during the day, the Foundation says. It offers this advice: Let baby learn to self-soothe.Put baby down drowsy, allowing the infant to fall asleep on his or her own. Then if baby wakes in the middle of the night, the infant can put himself or herself back to sleep without crying out for you. Make bedtime consistent. Put baby down to sleep as close to the same time every night. Accept setbacks. If baby is sick or a parent is traveling, baby may wake early. There is no "correct" way to sleep train.Determine which approach is right for you. Eventually, sleep training should work. As many as 80 percent of 9-month-olds sleep through the night, the foundation says. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Talk To Your Kids About a Tragedy

Posted 26 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- With graphic images of terrorist acts and mass shootings all over the news, it's difficult to keep your children from seeing and hearing about these events. The American Academy of Pediatrics says parents should explain these tragedies to children in ways they can understand and cope with. Explain in an age-appropriate way that you are here to protect and support them. Ask them what they've already heard, and ask if they have any questions. At the same time, avoid exposing your children directly to graphic images and descriptions that appear on TV or on social media. Some children may find it difficult to cope, and may fear for their lives and the lives of those they love. The academy says parents should watch for these warning signs of coping issues: Difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, or having nightmares. Physical signs, such as feeling tired, having a headache or ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Agitation, Agitated State

When It Comes to Obesity, Genes Just Partly to Blame

Posted 26 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 – If you have trouble keeping slim, don't put all the blame on your DNA. People carrying so-called "obesity" genes tend to gain more weight if they don't work out or don't get enough sleep, said Timothy Frayling, a professor with the University of Exeter Medical School in England. "You can't change your genes – but they only explain part of your weight," Frayling said. This means that even people genetically inclined to pile on pounds can curb it by eating right and exercising. Frayling and his fellow researchers tracked physical activity and sleep patterns for about 85,000 people in England, aged 40 to 70. The participants wore accelerometers that allowed researchers to estimate their amount of exercise and quality of sleep. The team also computed a genetic risk score for each person based on 76 common variants known to be associated with increased risk for ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Smartphones, Tablets Sabotaging Teens' Sleep

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – Teens sleep less than they used to, sacrificing shuteye to spend more time on their phones and tablets. Experts say teens need at least nine hours of sleep a night to be engaged and productive during the day. Anything less can cause daytime sleepiness and interfere with school or daily activities. Faced with an array of tempting distractions, how much sleep are today's teens actually getting? To find out, researchers analyzed a pair of long-term, national surveys of more than 360,000 eighth- through 12th-graders. One survey asked eighth-, 10th- and 12th-graders how often they got at least seven hours of shuteye. The other asked high school students how long they slept on a typical school night. In 2015, 4 out of 10 teens slept less than seven hours a night. That's up 58 percent since 1991 and 17 percent more than in 2009 when smartphone use became more ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated

Health Tip: Avoid Baby Sleep Positioners

Posted 16 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning parents against the use of baby sleep positioners. While these products may purport to prevent an infant from rolling, the products can lead to suffocation, the FDA says. To help keep baby safe, the agency suggests: Avoid infant sleep positioners of any kind. Do not use pillows, blankets, sheets, or quilts in a crib. Dress babies for the season to stay warm without extra blankets and sheets. Keep cribs bare of objects and toys. Always put baby on his or her back in a crib. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Delivery, Premature Labor, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Little Scientific Evidence Backs Up The Hype Around Mindfulness

Posted 11 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 – "Mindfulness" is touted as a cure-all for many modern ills, from stress and pain to depression. But little to no scientific evidence backs up most of the health claims surrounding the practice, said Willoughby Britton, director of Brown University's clinical and affective neuroscience laboratory. There's not even an agreed-upon definition of mindfulness that researchers can use to test the concept's effectiveness, Britton said. "Meditation researchers are concerned the exaggerated claims of mindfulness benefits will mislead vulnerable people and keep them from receiving evidence-based treatment," Britton said. In a new paper, Britton and 14 other experts say it's time to replace the hype with serious scientific rigor. Mindfulness has become a billion-dollar industry. Countless practitioners and more than 1,500 smartphone apps promise to help people become calm ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Health Tip: Getting Enough Sleep

Posted 10 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Children who participate in scholastic sports are at greater risk of injury if they don't get enough sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, children who get fewer than eight hours of sleep per night are 1.7 times more likely to get hurt while playing their sport, compared with those who get eight or more hours of sleep. The right amount of sleep benefits the young athlete's speed, accuracy and reaction time, the foundation says. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Insomnia - Stimulant-Associated

Remede System Approved for Sleep Apnea

Posted 9 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 9, 2017 – The Remede sleep system, an implanted device that treats central sleep apnea by activating a nerve that sends signals to the diaphragm to stimulate breathing, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Central sleep apnea occurs when the brain fails to send signals to the diaphragm, triggering lapses in breathing that can last a few seconds to minutes, the agency said in a news release. This can lead to poor sleep and ultimately raise a person's risk of health problems such as high blood pressure, heart attack, heart failure, stroke, obesity and diabetes, the FDA said. The condition is different from the more common obstructive sleep apnea, in which breathing disruptions are caused by upper airway obstruction. "Patients should speak with their health care providers about the benefits and risks of this new treatment option compared to other ... Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome

Working Night Shifts May Widen Your Waistline

Posted 4 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – Workers who regularly pull overnight shifts may be more prone to pack on the pounds, a new analysis suggests. The finding involved an in-depth look at 28 studies conducted between 1999 and 2016. All the investigations explored the health impact of shift work, in which employees are regularly asked to either alternate between daytime and overnight schedules or to exclusively work overnight hours. An estimated 700 million men and women around the world now follow that work pattern, representing about 20 percent of the global workforce, the researchers said. And while the numbers varied by study, the new analysis determined that, on average, routinely working a night shift seems to boost the risk for becoming obese or overweight by 29 percent. Although the review could not prove cause-and-effect, nutrition experts expressed little surprise at the finding. Connie ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Ischemic Stroke, Sleep Apnea, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Ischemic Heart Disease, Metabolic Disorder Including Congenital

Could You Be Overdoing It With Sleeping Pills?

Posted 4 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 4, 2017 – More Americans are having trouble getting a good night's sleep, a national health survey found. And the number of people who use prescription sleeping pills in the quest for shuteye continues to increase – currently about 4 percent of Americans, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But are they safe? And are they even effective? Results of studies done on the health hazards of sleeping pills vary widely, from one that found barely any elevated risk to another that found the risk of death for users is three times higher than it is for people who don't take them. Research published in the American Journal of Public Health confirms that fatal overdoses are a concern. There are also possible side effects and dependency problems to consider. Plus, according to Consumer Reports, over the long term, sleeping pills might not even bring ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Sleep Disorders, Klonopin, Insomnia, Clonazepam, Ativan, Ambien, Valium, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Diazepam, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Zolpidem, Buspirone, Melatonin, Nightmares, Temazepam, Diphenhydramine

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Insomnia, Narcolepsy, Sleep Apnea, Hypersomnia, Drowsiness, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Sleep Paralysis, Jet Lag, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Non-24-Hour Sleep Wake Disorder, Alcohol-Induced Sleep Disorder