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Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer News (Page 4)

Related terms: Cancer, Lung, Non-Small Cell, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell, NSCLC

Alecensa Approved for Lung Cancer Tied to Gene Mutation

Posted 21 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 11, 2015 – Alecensa (alectinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug administration to treat anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer, the agency said Friday in a news release. This type of cancer often spreads to the brain. The pill is sanctioned for instances of worsening disease after patients take a standard therapy called Xalkori (crizotinib), or if they are unable to tolerate Xalkori. More than 221,000 people in the United States are projected to develop lung cancer this year, and more than 158,000 will die from it, according to the National Cancer Institute. ALK gene mutations are involved in about 5 percent of cases of non-small cell lung cancer, the FDA said. Alecensa is designed to block the effects of the ALK protein, thereby preventing these cancer cells from growing and spreading. The most common side effects of the drug are ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Alecensa, Alectinib

FDA Approves Alecensa (alectinib) for ALK-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Posted 12 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

December 11, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Alecensa (alectinib) to treat people with advanced (metastatic) ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has worsened after, or who could not tolerate treatment with, another therapy called Xalkori (crizotinib). Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with an estimated 221,200 new diagnoses and 158,040 deaths in 2015, according to the National Cancer Institute. An ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) gene mutation can occur in several different types of cancer cells, including lung cancer cells. ALK gene mutations are present in about 5 percent of patients with NSCLC. In metastatic cancer, the disease spreads to new parts of the body. In ALK-positive NSCLC metastatic patients, the brain is a common place for the disease to spread. “Today’s approval provides a new th ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Alecensa, Alectinib

Portrazza Approved for Advanced Lung Cancer

Posted 12 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 24, 2015 – Portrazza (necitumumab), in combination with two other chemotherapy drugs, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer, the agency said Tuesday in a news release. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. More than 221,000 cases are expected to be diagnosed in the U.S. this year, and more than 158,000 people are projected to die from the disease, the FDA said. Portrazza, approved for people who haven't had a previous therapy for squamous NSCLC, is designed to block a protein that's frequently found on such tumors, the agency explained. The drug was evaluated in combination with two other drugs, gemcitabine and cisplatin. Those who took the three-drug combination lived for an average of 11.5 months, compared to 9.9 months among those who took the other two drugs ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Portrazza, Necitumumab

FDA Approves Portrazza (necitumumab) for Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Posted 1 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

November 24, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Portrazza (necitumumab) in combination with two forms of chemotherapy to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received medication specifically for treating their advanced lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with an estimated 221,200 new diagnoses and 158,040 deaths in 2015. The most common type of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, is further divided into two main types named for the kinds of cells found in the cancer – squamous cell and non-squamous cell (which includes adenocarcinoma). “Lung cancer tumors can be varied, so treatment options need to be tailored to the specific type of lung cancer in the patient,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncol ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Portrazza, Necitumumab

FDA Approves Tagrisso (osimertinib) for EGFR T790M Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Posted 16 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval for an oral medication to treat patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tagrisso (osimertinib) is now approved for patients whose tumors have a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (T790M) and whose disease has gotten worse after treatment with other EGFR-blocking therapy. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with an estimated 221,200 new diagnoses and 158,040 deaths in 2015, according to the National Cancer Institute. The most common type of lung cancer, NSCLC occurs when cancer cells form in the tissues of the lung. The EGFR gene is a protein involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells. “Our understanding of the molecular basis of lung cancer and reasons these cancers become resistant to prior treatments is rapidly evolving,” said R ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Tagrisso, Osimertinib

Lung Cancer Surgery Rates Differ Widely Between States

Posted 13 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 13, 2015 – Rates of surgery to cure lung cancer vary greatly across the United States, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from patients in 38 states and the District of Columbia who were diagnosed with early stage non-small cell lung cancer between 2007 and 2011. Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer. It can potentially be cured by surgery if it's detected at an early stage before it spreads, the study authors pointed out. The highest rates of surgery to cure lung cancer were seen in Massachusetts, New Jersey and Utah, at about 75 percent each. The lowest rate was in Wyoming, where patients were 25 percent less likely to have curative surgery than those in the top three states, the findings showed. "We do not have a uniform quality of health care in this country," said Dr. Helmneh Sineshaw, health services researcher with the American ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Vascular Surgery, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Benefit From Surgery

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 – Surgery to remove part of the lung can be a safe and effective treatment option for people with early stage lung cancer, even those traditionally considered "high-risk," a new study finds. Previous research had suggested that high-risk patients are more likely to have complications or to die after lung surgery. People aged 60 and older, long-term smokers, and people who have other health problems are considered high-risk for partial lung removal surgery, the researchers said. One in five patients with early stage non-small-cell lung cancer is deemed high-risk or ineligible for lung surgery, according to the study, which was published online Nov. 10 in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. But the new findings show these patients shouldn't be denied surgery, because they may benefit from it, study leader Dr. Manu Sancheti, from Emory University School of Medicine in ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Cancer, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Surgical Prophylaxis, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

FDA Expands Approved Use of Opdivo (nivolumab) in Advanced Lung Cancer

Posted 9 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

October 9, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Opdivo (nivolumab) to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) non-small cell lung cancer whose disease progressed during or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with an estimated 221,200 new diagnoses and 158,040 deaths in 2015. The most common type of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is further divided into two main types named for the kinds of cells found in the cancer – squamous cell and non-squamous cell (which includes adenocarcinoma).Opdivo works by targeting the cellular pathway known as PD-1/PD-L1 (proteins found on the body’s immune cells and some cancer cells). By blocking this pathway, Opdivo may help the body’s immune system fight the cancer cells. Earlier this year, the FDA approved Opdivo to treat patients with advan ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Opdivo, Nivolumab

Keytruda Approved for Leading Form of Lung Cancer

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Keytruda (pembrolizumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced cases of the most common type of lung malignancy, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The drug is approved for people whose tumors produce a protein called PD-L1, and whose cancer has lingered despite use of other treatments, the agency said Friday in a news release. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for more than 220,000 cases and more than 158,000 deaths so far this year, the FDA said. Keytruda, in blocking the PD-L1 protein, helps the body better fight this cancer, the FDA explained. The drug was first approved in 2014 to treat advanced melanoma skin cancer. Keytruda's performance in fighting lung cancer was evaluated in clinical studies of 550 people with advanced disease. The most common side effects ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Keytruda, Pembrolizumab

FDA Approves New Treatment for Lung Cancer

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved an immunotherapy drug for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Keytruda (pembrolizumab) can be used to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer in patients whose disease has progressed after previous treatments and who have tumors that express a protein called PD-L1, the agency said. "Today's approval of Keytruda gives physicians the ability to target specific patients who may be most likely to benefit from this drug," Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release. The Merck & Co. drug was approved for use with a companion diagnostic test that is the first designed to detect PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung tumors, the FDA said in the news release. By blocking what ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Keytruda, Pembrolizumab

FDA Approves Keytruda (pembrolizumab) for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

October 2, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval for Keytruda (pembrolizumab) to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has progressed after other treatments and with tumors that express a protein called PD-L1. Keytruda is approved for use with a companion diagnostic, the PD-L1 IHC 22C3 pharmDx test, the first test designed to detect PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung tumors. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with an estimated 221,200 new diagnoses and 158,040 deaths in 2015, according to the National Cancer Institute. NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer.“Our growing understanding of underlying molecular pathways and how our immune system interacts with cancer is leading to important advances in medicine,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director o ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Keytruda, Pembrolizumab

Study Says Radiation Often Overused in Late-Stage Lung Cancer

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Late-stage lung cancer patients in the United States often receive more radiation therapy than recommended, a new study finds. While radiation therapy can reduce pain and improve quality of life, unnecessary treatments increase costs and hospital visits, and can lead to radiation toxicity and difficulty swallowing, the researchers noted. "This study uncovered that there's a lot of treatment of late-stage lung cancer with palliative radiation that goes beyond what is recommended by several national guidelines and multiple clinical trials," said study author Dr. Matthew Koshy, a radiation oncologist at the University of Illinois Hospital. The researchers analyzed data from 47,000 advanced-lung cancer patients who received palliative radiation therapy – intended to ease their symptoms but not cure them – between 2004 and 2012. One in five also received ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Radiation Injury of Bone

CT Scans for Lung Cancer Turn Up Few False-Positives: Study

Posted 1 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 1, 2015 – Recently, CT-based screening for lung cancer in long-term smokers has been recommended by experts, and the scans are now covered by Medicare and some private insurers. But will these scans result in too many false-positive findings, causing patients unnecessary surgeries and trauma? A new study suggests otherwise. Researchers at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center in Burlington, Mass., tracked outcomes for almost 1,700 patients. The patients underwent low-dose CT screening for lung cancer at the hospital between 2012 and mid-2014. According to the researchers, false-positive findings were uncommon. "Surgical intervention for a non-lung cancer diagnosis was rare – five out of 1,654 patients or 0.3 percent," study co-leader Bryan Walker said in a news release from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. "That incidence is comparable to the 0.62 percent rate found in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Computed Tomography

New Drug May Boost Survival a Bit for Some With Advanced Lung Cancer

Posted 28 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Sept. 27, 2015 – A new study finds that the cancer drug nivolumab (Opdivo) extends the lives of some patients with advanced lung cancer for several months. In a head-to-head comparison, patients treated with nivolumab lived an average of 12.2 months, while patients treated with the chemotherapy drug docetaxel lived an average of 9.4 months, the researchers reported. "It looks like we have a new treatment option for patients with metastatic lung cancer that progresses after standard chemotherapy," said lead researcher Dr. Hossein Borghaei, chief of thoracic medical oncology at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. "Now we have another tool, but we have to learn how to make it better so people can even live longer," he said. The results of this phase 3 trial, which was funded by nivolumab's maker Bristol-Myers Squibb, were to be presented Sunday at the European Cancer Congress ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Opdivo, Taxotere, Nivolumab, Docetaxel, Bronchogenic Carcinoma, Docefrez

Differences Found in Smokers, Nonsmokers Who Develop Lung Cancer

Posted 28 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Sept. 27, 2015 – A new study has identified significant differences between lung cancer patients who smoke and those who don't. Smoking is the main risk factor for non-small cell lung cancer, but nonsmokers can get it too and rates of the disease among nonsmokers are rising in many countries, according to researchers at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology in Lisbon. The investigators compared more than 1,400 Portuguese patients with this type of lung cancer and found that nonsmokers were more likely than smokers to be women and to have adenocarcinoma, the most common form of non-small cell lung cancer. The nonsmokers were also less likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart disease, previous cancer of the larynx, or weight loss, the results showed. In addition, nonsmokers lived about twice as long after diagnosis, an average of 51 months compared to 25 ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Smoking, Weight Loss, Smoking Cessation, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer

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