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Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer News

Related terms: Cancer, Lung, Non-Small Cell, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell, NSCLC

FDA Approves Genentech’s Cancer Immunotherapy Tecentriq (Atezolizumab) for People with a Specific Type of Metastatic Lung Cancer

Posted 3 days ago by

South San Francisco, CA – October 18, 2016 – Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Tecentriq (atezolizumab) for the treatment of people with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have disease progression during or following platinum-containing chemotherapy, and have progressed on an appropriate FDA-approved targeted therapy if their tumor has EGFR or ALK gene abnormalities. This approval is based on results from the randomized Phase III OAK and Phase II POPLAR studies. The largest study, OAK, showed that Tecentriq helped people in the overall study population live a median of 13.8 months, 4.2 months longer than those treated with docetaxel chemotherapy (median overall survival [OS]: 13.8 vs. 9.6 months; HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.63, 0.87). The study enrolled people ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Tecentriq, Atezolizumab

New Type of Radiation Treatment May Up Survival for Older Lung Cancer Patients

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – Cutting-edge radiation therapy seems to provide a significant survival advantage for older people with early stage lung cancer who aren't strong enough for surgery, a pair of new studies suggests. The therapy is called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and it's been available for about a decade. The first study reviewed national cancer data and found that survival rates for older lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy increased dramatically between 2004 and 2012. Those are the years during which SBRT use became widespread in the United States, said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Farach, a radiation oncologist at Houston Methodist Hospital. A second study based on Veterans Affairs cancer treatment data appears to corroborate the national findings, directly linking increased use of SBRT with improved survival rates in elderly patients. Farach ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

More Cancer Patients Gaining From Immune-Based Treatments

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – A leading cancer group says more Americans are benefiting from immunotherapy – a relatively new treatment approach that helps the immune system target and destroy cancer cells. "The promise of immunotherapy for cancer therapy has never been greater, and the opportunity to make significant progress in this critical area is real," said Dr. Nancy Davidson, president of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). The AACR issued the news on immunotherapy as part of its 2016 Cancer Progress Report. As the group explained, more types of cancer are being successfully treated with immunotherapy. This treatment involves adding new cancer-fighting cells to the body or adding new elements, such as antibodies and proteins, to help the immune system fight cancer. In August 2015, one class of immunotherapy drugs – called checkpoint inhibitors – was approved for ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Bladder Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Opdivo, Keytruda, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Head and Neck Cancer, Tecentriq, Nivolumab, Pembrolizumab, Atezolizumab

14 Genes That May Affect Cancer Treatment

Posted 31 Aug 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31, 2016 – Researchers say they've identified 14 genes that may help determine whether a cancer treatment could help a patient. The researchers also say the findings suggest it could be possible to help people avoid unnecessary cancer treatments that won't likely benefit them. "The history of cancer treatment is filled with overreaction," said principal investigator Gary Karpen, a senior scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif. "It is part of the ethics of cancer treatment to err on the side of overtreatment, but these treatments have serious side effects associated with them. For some people, it may be causing more trouble than if the growth was left untreated," Karpen said in a Berkeley Lab release. However, there has not been a reliable way to determine which early stage cancer patients will respond to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients

Posted 5 Aug 2016 by

FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 – Air pollution may shorten the lives of lung cancer patients, a new study suggests. Researchers led by Sandrah Eckel, who's with the department of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, analyzed data from more than 352,000 people in California who were diagnosed with lung cancer between 1988 and 2009. Higher exposure to the pollutants nitrogen dioxide, ozone and airborne particles was associated with an increased risk of early death. The association was strongest in patients with early stage disease, particularly adenocarcinoma, which accounts for 80 percent of lung cancer cases, the researchers said. Early stage patients with greater exposure to pollutants survived on average 2.4 years compared to 5.7 years for those with low exposure, the study found. The study was published online Aug. 4 in the journal Thorax. Since this ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

New Guidelines Issued for Cancer Patients' Post-Treatment Pain

Posted 29 Jul 2016 by

FRIDAY, July 29, 2016 – More people are surviving cancer, but many are left with persistent pain after treatment. New guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recommend that doctors routinely screen for such pain. The guidelines also advise doctors to consider the use of non-traditional treatments for pain. These include hypnosis, meditation and medical marijuana where it's legal. ASCO also cautioned doctors to assess patients' risk for overuse of opioid painkillers. "Many oncologists and primary care physicians are not trained to recognize or treat long-term pain associated with cancer," guideline panel co-chair Judith Paice said in an ASCO news release. "This guideline will help clinicians identify pain early and develop comprehensive treatment plans, using a broad range of approaches," she said. Advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment have led to a record ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Suboxone, Oxycodone, Methadone, Hydrocodone, Percocet, Tramadol, Cancer, OxyContin, Vicodin, Norco, Fentanyl, Morphine, Codeine, Lortab, Tylenol, Chronic Pain, Opana, Ibuprofen, Subutex

U.S. Cancer Survivors Living Longer

Posted 1 Jul 2016 by

FRIDAY, July 1, 2016 – As the American population ages, more older adults will survive cancer and live with other chronic conditions that will burden the health care system, U.S. government health officials report. "Increasingly, we are seeing the impact of an aging population – fueled by maturing baby boomers – on major diseases, including cancer," said lead researcher Shirley Bluethmann, a cancer prevention fellow at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. In 2016, nearly 62 percent of almost 16 million cancer survivors are aged 65 or older, the researchers said. By 2040, an estimated 73 percent of 26 million cancer survivors will be 65 or older. "This steady and dramatic growth will affect the health care system, and so is sometimes referred to as the 'silver tsunami,' " Bluethmann said. "It not only has implications for older people who are at higher risk for cancer, it also means ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Solid Tumors

Video May Aid End-of-Life Decision-Making

Posted 30 Jun 2016 by

THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 – Watching a video about end-of-life care options may help patients with advanced heart failure choose the approach best for them, a new study finds. The choices include comfort-focused care versus more invasive care that could extend their days. "Because the course of heart failure is uncertain, in part because of improved therapies, doctors may be reluctant to initiate a conversation with their patients about advance care planning," said study lead author Dr. Areej El-Jawahri. She is director of the bone marrow transplant survivorship program at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston, and a member of the Video Images of Disease for Ethical Outcomes Consortium, which develops videos for decision-making support. Heart failure means the heart struggles to provide the body with enough blood to remain healthy. People with advanced heart failure tend ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Ovarian Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Breast Cancer - Palliative

Do Too Many Lung Cancer Patients Miss Out on Surgery?

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 – Many patients with advanced lung cancer might live longer if treated surgically, but few go that route, new research indicates. A study of U.S. patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer found only 11 percent underwent surgery – and 27 percent got no treatment at all. Yet surgery, either alone or with other treatments, prolonged survival by as much as 41 months, researchers said. "We were surprised by the findings, but they have to be considered with caution," said study lead author Dr. Elizabeth David, an assistant professor of surgery at the University of California, Davis Medical Center, in Sacramento. "Surgery is not appropriate for every patient with stage 3 or 4 lung cancer," she noted. "We just need to make sure that appropriate patients are evaluated by surgeons, and we are working on ways to make that easier." At stages 3 and 4, the cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Middle-Aged More Often Diagnosed With Late-Stage Lung Cancer

Posted 17 Jun 2016 by

THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 – British middle-aged adults are more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer than those who are slightly older, a new study finds. Researchers reviewed information from about 34,000 lung cancer patients in England in 2013. They found that a higher percentage of those ages 50 to 64 were diagnosed with late-stage disease than those ages 65 to 69. Patients in their 70s were more likely to be diagnosed with early stage disease. "Our results show that younger patients in their 50s and early 60s are more likely to be diagnosed with advanced lung cancer compared to patients in older age groups," David Kennedy, a data and research analyst at Cancer Research UK, said in a news release from the organization. It's not clear why younger patients are more likely to be diagnosed with the advanced stage of the disease, said Dr. Julie Sharp, Cancer Research UK's ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Body Imaging, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That

Posted 9 Jun 2016 by

THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 – A new smartphone app may help lung cancer patients live longer and better by monitoring their symptoms and alerting doctors to potential problems, researchers report. The Moovcare smartphone and web application proved so effective that researchers ended the clinical trial early, said study author Dr. Fabrice Denis, a researcher at the Institut Inter-regional de Cancerologie Jean Bernard in Le Mans, France. About 75 percent of high-risk lung cancer patients were alive one year after they started using the Moovcare app, compared with 49 percent of patients provided typical cancer care, Denis said. Patients also lived seven months longer, on average, when using Moovcare – about 19 months compared to an average of 12 months for nonusers. Further, Moovcare patients required less regular CT scanning. "The number of imaging scans were reduced by 50 percent per ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Bronchogenic Carcinoma

Useless Treatments Common in Young, Terminal Cancer Patients

Posted 6 Jun 2016 by

MONDAY, June 6, 2016 – Three-quarters of young or middle-aged Americans with terminal cancer receive aggressive treatment during the last month of their lives, even though such care may provide nothing but misery, a new study estimates. An analysis of insurance records found that cancer patients often undergo chemotherapy, radiation therapy or surgery in their final 30 days. One-third die in the hospital, while fewer than one in five use hospice care to ease their suffering, according to findings presented Monday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. "Additional efforts are critically needed to improve end-of-life care for patients with terminal disease, to ensure that the care provided meets the goals and preferences of patients and their families," said lead researcher Dr. Ronald Chen. He is an associate professor of radiation oncology at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Gastric Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy

Global Recession May Have Contributed to Cancer Deaths

Posted 26 May 2016 by

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 – The 2008 global economic crisis has been linked to a sharp rise in deaths from cancer, a new study reports. Unemployment and cuts in public health-care spending were associated with more than 260,000 additional cancer deaths by 2010. Most of those deaths – 160,000 – were in the European Union, the researchers said. The study included 70 countries and a total of more than 2 billion people, according to the report published online May 25 in The Lancet. "Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, so understanding how economic changes affect cancer survival is crucial," lead author Dr. Mahiben Maruthappu, of Imperial College London, said in a journal news release. "We found that increased unemployment was associated with increased cancer mortality, but that universal health coverage protected against these effects. This was especially the case for treatable ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Pancreatic Cancer, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Cervical Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Gastric Cancer, Testicular Cancer, Solid Tumors

Exercise May Cut Risk of 13 Cancers, Study Suggests

Posted 16 May 2016 by

MONDAY, May 16, 2016 – Exercise may significantly reduce your risk for many types of cancer, including some of the most lethal forms of the disease, a large review suggests. Working out for even a couple of hours a week appears to shrink the risk of breast, colon and lung cancer, said researchers who looked at 1.4 million adults. "Those are three of the four major cancers that affect Americans today," said Marilie Gammon. She is a professor of epidemiology with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Public Health. And fitness buffs, take heart – your cancer risk appears to continue to decline as you rack up hours of physical activity, with no apparent upper plateau, said study lead author Steven Moore, an investigator with the U.S. National Cancer Institute. "The more activity, the more the benefit," Moore said. "As people did more, their risk continued to ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Leukemia, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, Endometrial Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Stomach Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Head and Neck Cancer, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Gastric Cancer, Osteolytic Bone Lesions of Multiple Myeloma, Urinary Tract Cancer, Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

Radon in the Home May Be Linked to Blood Cancers in Women

Posted 3 May 2016 by

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – New research suggests a strong link between exposure to high levels of radon in the home and women's risk of blood cancers. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says. It's known to cause lung cancer and is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, the researchers said. The American Cancer Society collected information over 19 years on more than 140,000 Americans as part of a prevention study. During that time, just over 3,000 cases of blood cancer were diagnosed. The cancers included leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma, the study found. Women who lived in counties with the highest radon levels were 63 percent more likely to develop blood cancers than those in counties with the lowest radon levels. There was no link seen among men, the study noted. The study was published online recently in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Leukemia, Lung Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, Poisoning, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

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