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Infectious Gastroenteritis News

Related terms: Gastroenteritis, viral, Norovirus enteritis, Norwalk virus, Rotaviral enteritis, Stomach Flu

'Good' Donor Bacteria Can Last Long Term in Stool Transplant Patients

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – Researchers say their small study offers the first proof that therapeutic donor microbes remain for months or years in patients who've undergone stool transplants. Medically known as "fecal microbiota transplantation" (FMT), the procedure is used to treat severe diarrhea and colitis caused by repeated Clostridium difficile infections, the researchers explained. FMT is an increasingly popular treatment for C. difficile infections, with a 90 percent success rate. It involves collecting stool from a healthy donor and mixing it with salt water. The solution is then transferred to the patient's digestive tract through a thin, flexible tube called a colonoscope, or through the nose. C. difficile gut infections can be deadly. They often follow use of antibiotics that change the normal balance of bacteria in a patient's gut. C. difficile is increasingly resistant to ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Clostridial Infection, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

Health Tip: Getting Over a Stomach Virus

Posted 10 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- After a gastrointestinal virus makes your stomach sensitive and you feel nauseated, avoid heavy foods that can worsen your symptoms. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests these easy-on-your-tummy foods: Bananas. Rice and plain potatoes. Plain applesauce. Plain dry toast. Saltine crackers. Clear broth. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Preparing Nutritious Meals

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Preparing a week's worth of meals on the weekends ensures that you have a steady supply of nutritious offerings. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends: Grocery shopping on Saturdays, and cooking food for the week on Sundays. Most food will stay safe three-to-four days in the refrigerator. Divide cooked food into portions, store in small containers and immediately refrigerate. Don't leave food on the counter to cool. Reheat only the portion for that night's meal, rather than the whole dish. You can't always see, smell or taste spoiled food. If you're not sure if it's safe to eat, throw it out. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

U.S. Health Officials Make Headway Against Salmonella

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – A new government report that lists the top offenders for food poisoning shows that U.S. health officials have made progress against salmonella infections. In 2016, there was an 18 percent drop in illnesses caused by this common type of bacteria, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tougher regulations and more vaccinations of chickens most likely explain the decrease, the researchers said. "We are making progress in detecting and responding more quickly to foodborne illness, but our priority remains preventing illnesses from happening in the first place," said Susan Mayne. She directs the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. "The final rules we are implementing under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act focus on prevention, and we will continue to work closely with ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Freezing Food

Posted 7 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Freezing food helps avoid the growth of germs, allowing perishables to last longer than if they were refrigerated. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers these suggestions for freezing food safely: Make sure your freezer is set to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. Confirm the temperature with an appliance thermometer. While you can freeze just about anything except canned foods or eggs in shells, some foods (such as lettuce, cream sauces or mayonnaise) may not maintain quality. Store food in freezer-safe bags, heavy plastic containers or heavyweight aluminum foil. Date and label foods before storing in the freezer. Use older foods before newer ones to help thwart freezer burn. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Store Cooking Oils Correctly

Posted 30 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A heart-healthy cooking oil – such as olive, walnut or avocado oil – can help in preparing nutritious meals. But be careful how you store it. The Cleveland Clinic explains: Exposure to light or heat over time can affect an oil's taste. So store it in a cool, dark place. If your oil begins to taste a bit off, toss it and buy a fresh bottle. Grapeseed and walnut oils should be stored in the refrigerator. They can quickly become rancid. It's safe to store most oils in the refrigerator. Though they may appear cloudy, that effect disappears when an oil reaches room temperature. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Prepare Homemade Baby Food

Posted 18 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Some new parents enjoy making homemade baby food. But it's important to follow safety guidelines to help prevent food poisoning. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advises: Thoroughly wash your hands, as well as any utensils and containers that will be used to prepare and store baby food. Wash all produce, and carefully peel and remove all pits and seeds. Use caution with produce grown close to the ground, which may harbor germs. Steam or microwave vegetables until soft, then puree. Never add salt, honey or corn syrup. Never add egg whites until after the child's first birthday. Always make sure egg whites are well cooked. Thoroughly cook all meat, eggs and poultry. Immediately refrigerate or freeze baby food in a sealed container after cooking. It can be stored one-to-two days in the refrigerator, or three-to four months in the freezer. Add a dated label so you know the food is ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Clean Your Refrigerator

Posted 2 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A clean refrigerator can help prevent food-related illness. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers these suggestions: Immediately clean up spilled juices, particularly from raw meat. To defrost, always put uncooked meat on the bottom shelf inside a container with a lid. Use warm, soapy water and a sponge to clean shelves, drawers and other surfaces. Avoid spray cleaners. Dry with a clean paper towel or cloth. Clean the door handle frequently. Place an open box of baking soda inside your fridge to absorb odors. Change it every three months. Wipe away dust from the front grill of your refrigerator to keep it working efficiently. Read more

Related support groups: Gastrointestinal Disorders, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Slow-Cooking Food Safely

Posted 23 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

-- The slow cooker is a convenient way to whip up a healthy dinner for your family. But food safety rules still apply, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advises. Here are the group's suggestions: Thoroughly clean the slow cooker, work area and your hands before preparing food. Keep all perishables in the refrigerator until right before it is time to add them. Prepare meat and vegetables separately, refrigerating them in separate containers. Defrost meat – always in the refrigerator – before putting it in the slow cooker. Cook foods all day on the "low" setting, or for the first hour on "high," then dropping to "low." Use a food thermometer to make sure it's cooked thoroughly. The cooker should be no more than 1/2 to 2/3 full. Cut up large chunks of meat to help ensure a better fit and more thorough cooking. Do not remove the lid while cooking. And when it's time to store ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

Warmer Waters May Mean More Toxic Shellfish

Posted 9 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Unusually warm ocean temperatures near the U.S. Pacific Northwest have been linked to dangerous levels of a natural toxin in shellfish. But, researchers report they have developed new ways to predict these toxic outbreaks. The toxin, domoic acid, is produced by marine algae, or plant life. It builds up in seafood, posing a potential threat. Consuming the toxin can be harmful to humans, the researchers said. The project was funded by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). "We describe a completely new method to understanding and predicting toxic outbreaks on a large scale, linking domoic acid concentrations in shellfish to ocean conditions caused by warm water phases of natural climate event cycles," said study author Morgaine McKibben of Oregon State University. Those "climate event cycles" include El Nino and a similar but long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Enjoying Rare Meat Safely

Posted 6 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

-- If you prefer rare meat to well done, you might be wondering if the rare variety is safe. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics explains: A food thermometer should be used to make sure rare meat is hot enough to destroy any germs. Avoid using other cues, such as the color of meat, the color of juices or the firmness of meat, to determine if it's sufficiently cooked. Ground lamb, pork, veal or beef should be cooked to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Whole steak needs to be cooked to 145 degrees Fahrenheit at its center. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Don't Let Food Poisoning Ruin Your Holiday Celebration

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Party guests always seem to wind up in the host's kitchen, but too many cooks boost the risk of mistakes that could lead to food poisoning, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The group says it's also important to keep food safety in mind when preparing homemade food gifts and holiday buffets. It offers these tips: Wash hands before, during and after preparing food. It's also important to wash when switching from one task to another. All kitchen surfaces – including appliances, countertops, cutting boards and utensils – should be kept clean throughout the cooking process. Use hot, soapy water. Never cut raw meat, poultry or fish on the same cutting board as foods like fruits and vegetables that don't have to be cooked. Using color-coded cutting boards can make it easier to remember which one to use for each food. Use different utensils for ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea Prophylaxis

How to Ship Food Gifts Without Risk

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Homemade food gifts can make loved ones afar feel closer, but it's important to take extra safety precautions to prevent food poisoning, according to the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AAND). Bacteria that cause food-borne illnesses grow quickly at temperatures between 40 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, potentially doubling every 20 minutes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When shipping perishable items, make sure they are kept below 40 degrees, AAND advises. Let the recipient know a perishable package is on the way and be sure someone will be home to receive it. Even foods that are smoked, cured or fully cooked should be kept cold. This can be done using dry ice and foam or heavy corrugated cardboard packaging, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service recommends. Whenever ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Using a Food Thermometer

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Using a food thermometer takes the guesswork out of determining whether food is cooked completely and is safe to eat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests the right way to use a food thermometer: Select the right type of thermometer for your needs, from pop-up to digital to manual. Make sure you follow product instructions. Use either ice water or freezing water to make sure the thermometer is accurate. Wait the recommended amount of time before you read your thermometer. Make sure you know the safe temperature for the type of food you are cooking. After using, always clean your thermometer with hot, soapy water. Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

How to Prepare That Holiday Turkey Safely

Posted 22 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 – The traditional turkey centerpiece on Thanksgiving tables may come out looking scrumptious, but cooks in the kitchen need to be concerned about preparing the bird safely to prevent the spread of foodborne illness. That's the advice from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), which offers the following safety precautions based on how your turkey will be prepared: Fresh Turkey A fresh turkey should be refrigerated until it's time to cook it. Be sure to place it in a pan that will catch any leaking juices and prevent the spread of potentially harmful bacteria, the agency advises. The USDA also recommends buying a fresh turkey no more than a day or two ahead of time. Never buy a pre-stuffed fresh turkey, the agency adds. The stuffing in these turkeys may not have been handled properly and may contain harmful germs. Frozen Turkey Turkeys can be safely ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

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