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Infectious Gastroenteritis News

Related terms: Gastroenteritis, viral, Norovirus enteritis, Norwalk virus, Rotaviral enteritis, Stomach Flu

Heath Tip: 10 Mistakes People Make in Food Preparation

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Homemade food should be nutritious and safe. But experts at the foodsafety.org website cite 10 common food-preparation mistakes: Tasting older food to see if it's still good. It's better to be safe and just throw it out. Putting cooked meat back on a plate that held raw meat. At the very least, the plate should be washed with hot water and soap. Better yet, use a different plate. Thawing food on the counter. Washing meat or poultry. This actually may contaminate your sink and counters. Letting food cool before putting it in the fridge. Eating raw dough, cookie dough, cake batter or other foods with uncooked eggs or uncooked flour Marinating meat or seafood on the counter. Using raw meat marinade on cooked food. Undercooking meat, poultry, seafood or eggs. Not washing your hands. When in doubt, wash your hands often and with lots of soapy hot water. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Leading Causes of Food Poisoning

Posted 12 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- More than a million Americans each year suffer the symptoms of food poisoning, including nausea and vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, fever and dehydration. Here are leading causes of food poisoning, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Bacteria and viruses, such as Salmonella, norovirus, campylobacter, E. coli, Listeria, clostridium and perfringens. Parasites, such as protozoa or roundworms. Mold, toxins and contaminants, both natural and chemical. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

People Picking Up Infection From Pet Store Puppies' Poop: CDC

Posted 11 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 – Bacterial infections that have sickened 39 people in seven states have been linked to puppies sold through Petland, a national pet store chain, U.S. health officials say. Campylobacter infections have been reported between September 2016 and August 2017 in Florida, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Wisconsin, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nine people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. "Evidence suggests that puppies sold through Petland are a likely source of this outbreak," according to a CDC news release. "Petland is cooperating with public health and animal health officials to address this outbreak." Campylobacter is a bacteria that causes people to develop diarrhea (sometimes bloody), cramping, abdominal pain, and fever within two to five days of exposure to the organism, said Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Posted 8 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

-- More than 400,000 Americans get sick every year from antibiotic-resistant foodborne bacteria, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. These infections, which resist the effects of antibiotics, are harder to treat and often lead to more severe illness. The CDC suggests how to protect yourself and your family from bacteria: Take antibiotics only when needed. Use a food thermometer to ensure that foods are cooked to a safe internal temperature: 145 degrees F for whole beef, pork, lamb, and veal; 160 degrees F for ground meats; and 165 degrees F for all poultry. Wash your hands after touching raw meat, poultry, and seafood. Also wash your work surfaces, cutting boards, utensils, and grill before and after cooking. Keep your refrigerator below 40 degrees F, and refrigerate foods within one hour of cooking. Germs from raw meat, poultry, seafood, and eggs can spread to ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Harvey's Health Hazards Will Continue During Cleanup

Posted 1 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2017 – Hurricane Harvey is finally winding down, but residents and volunteers in the Houston area must remain on guard against health hazards that will continue during the cleanup effort, public health officials say. Floodwater contamination will be the first and foremost problem people face as they return to their homes and businesses, said Cleveland Clinic infectious disease expert Dr. Frank Esper. The water that entered their homes was loaded with bacteria from raw sewage, and likely also included chemicals and toxins from businesses and industrial sites, said Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association. Esper warned that "even after the floodwaters have receded, the bacteria will remain a threat to health. You need to make sure you are cleaning anything that could have been contaminated by these floodwaters." Alcohol-based ... Read more

Related support groups: Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Hepatitis A, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Harvey's Floodwaters Harbor Many Health Hazards

Posted 30 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 30, 2017 – Texans trapped in the unprecedented flooding wrought by Hurricane Harvey now face untold health hazards, officials say. The filthy water that has inundated the city of Houston poses the most immediate danger, said Cleveland Clinic infectious disease expert Dr. Frank Esper. "Those floodwaters are being contaminated with sewage, because the sewers themselves are completely flooded and are backing up through the drains into the standing bodies of water that are around and in people's homes," Esper said. "Every time a person is wading across the street to get from one place to another, or down the road to get to higher ground, they are encountering much, much higher loads of bacteria." But beyond that short-term threat, other hazards and medical problems will crop up due to the lack of modern amenities in Harvey's aftermath, experts said. Dr. Bruce Farber is ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Bacterial Skin Infection, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Tetanus Toxoid, Twinrix, Kinrix, Havrix, Wound Infection, Pediarix, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Hepatitis A Adult Vaccine, Boostrix (Tdap), Zika Virus Infection, Diphtheria Toxoid/Pertussis, Acellular/Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated/Tetanus Toxoid, Diphtheria Toxoid/Tetanus Toxoid, Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed, Tetanus Prophylaxis, Diphtheria Toxoid/Pertussis, Whole Cell/Tetanus Toxoid

How Safe Is Your Drinking Water? Take a Look

Posted 23 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 – Even if local health officials say it's safe, cloudy drinking water may have the potential to cause vomiting and diarrhea, a new research review finds. Researchers looked at past North American and European studies exploring the link between water cloudiness, or turbidity, and tummy troubles. "More than 10 studies found a link between water turbidity and acute gastrointestinal illness incidence," said researcher Anneclaire De Roos. "These results suggest that exposures through drinking water caused a low but detectable number of acute gastrointestinal illness cases in the regions and time periods studied," added De Roos, an associate professor at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health in Philadelphia. While the study doesn't establish a causal relationship, there's no clear alternative explanation for the patterns of associations seen in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diarrhea, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Giardiasis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Cryptosporidiosis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Less is More for the Adult Cholera Vaccine

Posted 19 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Aug. 18, 2017 – Researchers say one dose of cholera vaccine appears to provide about the same protection as the standard two doses, at least for the first six months. They also found that cholera vaccines are highly effective in adults but less so in young children, who are at particular risk of death from the disease. The review of seven clinical trials and six observational studies found that the two-dose vaccine regimen reduced cholera risk on average by 58 percent in adults, but only 30 percent in children under age 5. While one dose of vaccine protected as well as two doses for the first six months, there were no data on long-term protection of a single dose, researchers said. The findings could help guide vaccine use, particularly during outbreaks of the diarrheal disease, according to the researchers. "There continues to be a lot of misinformation on what this vaccine is ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Cholera, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Cholera Vaccine, Cholera Vaccine, Live

An Expert's Guide to Preventing Food Poisoning

Posted 13 Aug 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Aug. 12, 2017 – Foodborne illnesses sicken almost 50 million people annually in the United States, according to government statistics. But many of those episodes could be prevented, and proper sanitation when handling food is the key, says one expert. "If all of us washed our hands and were careful with food, it would greatly reduce the number of infections we see," said Dr. Ross Rodgers, an emergency medicine physician at Penn State Medical Center. Rodgers offered these tips in a hospital news release: Never use leftover marinade on cooked foods, and don't use utensils that have touched uncooked food to serve prepared items. Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is cooked to a safe temperature. (That's 145 degrees Fahrenheit for beef, veal and lamb steaks, roasts or chops; 160 degrees for ground meat and meat mixtures; and 165 degrees for poultry, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Keep Your Summer Cookouts Safe

Posted 9 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, July 9, 2017 – Backyard barbecues are a seasonal staple, but summer heat makes it extra important to keep food safety in mind. Bacteria grow faster at temperatures between 40 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, increasing your risk for foodborne illnesses, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Fortunately, there are a lot of steps consumers can take to keep family and friends from becoming ill," the FDA's Marjorie Davidson said in an agency news release. Davidson is education team leader in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. For starters, make sure your hands are clean. Before you cook or eat, wash with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If there's no sink available, use a water jug, soap and some paper towels. Or clean your hands with moist, disposable towelettes, the FDA advised. These steps will also help prevent foodborne illness: Don't ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Think Safety First When Dining Outdoors

Posted 30 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 30, 2017 – When you're hosting picnics in the park or patio barbecues, you might be totally focused on creating the menu and doing your grocery shopping. But how you prepare, transport and serve those special dishes is just as important to avoid foodborne illnesses, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Whether eating on your patio or packing food to go, remember to keep raw meat, chicken and seafood separate from other foods to avoid cross-contamination. Marinate food in the fridge, not on your counter. Avoid drips on the way to the grill and throw out any liquid left in the bowl you used. Wash platters and utensils used on raw meat before using them for cooked foods. Get in the habit of using a food thermometer when grilling to test for doneness, and then keep hot foods hot by moving them to the sides of the grill rack. Keep cold foods well chilled. At ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

How to Dodge Summertime Threats

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – During the summer, poison centers get an increase in the number of calls about bites, stings, plants and pesticides. The Nebraska Regional Poison Center offers these tips on how to avoid poisonings – and other hazards – this summer. "If you are stung, call the poison center. Close observation for allergic reaction is important, especially in the first hour after a sting," the center said in a news release. Use only insect repellents that are meant to be used on skin. Products containing DEET should be applied sparingly to exposed skin and clothing – and repellents with less than 10 percent DEET are as effective as stronger ones. Wash thoroughly once you go indoors. A seasonal threat to kids is exposure to gasoline, kerosene, lighter fluids and torch fuels. These products are among the top 10 causes of childhood poisoning deaths in the United States, according ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Hangover, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Insect Bites, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

'Good' Donor Bacteria Can Last Long Term in Stool Transplant Patients

Posted 16 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – Researchers say their small study offers the first proof that therapeutic donor microbes remain for months or years in patients who've undergone stool transplants. Medically known as "fecal microbiota transplantation" (FMT), the procedure is used to treat severe diarrhea and colitis caused by repeated Clostridium difficile infections, the researchers explained. FMT is an increasingly popular treatment for C. difficile infections, with a 90 percent success rate. It involves collecting stool from a healthy donor and mixing it with salt water. The solution is then transferred to the patient's digestive tract through a thin, flexible tube called a colonoscope, or through the nose. C. difficile gut infections can be deadly. They often follow use of antibiotics that change the normal balance of bacteria in a patient's gut. C. difficile is increasingly resistant to ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Clostridial Infection, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

Health Tip: Getting Over a Stomach Virus

Posted 10 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- After a gastrointestinal virus makes your stomach sensitive and you feel nauseated, avoid heavy foods that can worsen your symptoms. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests these easy-on-your-tummy foods: Bananas. Rice and plain potatoes. Plain applesauce. Plain dry toast. Saltine crackers. Clear broth. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Preparing Nutritious Meals

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Preparing a week's worth of meals on the weekends ensures that you have a steady supply of nutritious offerings. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends: Grocery shopping on Saturdays, and cooking food for the week on Sundays. Most food will stay safe three-to-four days in the refrigerator. Divide cooked food into portions, store in small containers and immediately refrigerate. Don't leave food on the counter to cool. Reheat only the portion for that night's meal, rather than the whole dish. You can't always see, smell or taste spoiled food. If you're not sure if it's safe to eat, throw it out. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

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