Skip to Content

Join the 'Heart Disease' group to help and get support from people like you.

Heart Disease News (Page 7)

Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

Suicide, Drugs Only Partly to Blame for Rising Deaths of Middle-Aged U.S. Whites

Posted 29 Jan 2016 by

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 – Death rates among middle-aged white Americans were higher than expected in 2014, likely because progress against common killers such as diabetes and heart disease has halted, a new study contends. Substance abuse and suicide rates among white adults ages 45 to 54 have risen, but not enough to explain why death rates in this group have shifted from their historical decline, according to the Commonwealth Fund report released Jan. 29. If death rates in this group had followed past patterns, they would have fallen 1.8 percent a year between 1999 and 2014. Instead, they rose, the new study found. "We are accustomed to making progress against diseases. We learn how to prevent them and how to treat them and, as we do that, fewer people die from them," Commonwealth Fund President Dr. David Blumenthal, a study co-author, said in a news release. "For middle-aged whites, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Diabetes, Type 2, Major Depressive Disorder, Heart Disease, Postpartum Depression, Insulin Resistance, Dysthymia, Pre-Diabetes, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

After Heart Surgery, House Calls by Physician's Assistants Help

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – Heart surgery patients who receive home visits from physician's assistants are less likely to be readmitted to the hospital, a new study finds. They also have lower overall health care costs, the researchers said. The study followed nearly 1,200 people after heart surgery. In the week after leaving the hospital, some patients received two home visits from cardiac surgery physician's assistants involved in their care, while those in a "control" group received no visits. Patients who received physician's assistant visits on the second and fifth day after leaving the hospital were 41 percent less likely than those in the control group to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days – 10 percent versus 17 percent, the study found. House calls to 540 patients cost $23,500, but saved $977,500 in hospital readmission costs, researchers said. That means $39 was saved ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Women's Heart Attacks Are Different Than Men's, Experts Stress

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Heart attacks in women often have different causes and symptoms than those in men, and they're deadlier, too. That's the premise of a scientific statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) that hopes to raise awareness about key differences in heart attack indicators and treatment in women. Women who don't recognize their heart attack symptoms won't seek needed medical care, said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. "These delays in care contribute to higher mortality rates experienced by women, particularly younger women," he said. Worldwide, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women. Since 1984 in the United States, heart attack survival has improved for women. But the heart death rates among women still outpace heart deaths in men, according to the AHA statement. The new ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Long-Term Smog Exposure May Boost Heart, Lung Disease Deaths

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – Long-term exposure to ozone air pollution – commonly known as smog – may increase the risk of death from heart and lung diseases, a new study indicates. Researchers reviewed data from a U.S. study that began in 1982 and found that for every additional 10 parts per billion (ppb) in long-term ozone exposure, adults were 12 percent more likely to die from lung disease. In addition, they were 3 percent more likely to die from heart disease, and 2 percent more likely to die from any cause, according to the study. It was published online recently in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Pollution specifically attributed to traffic was linked to a 41 percent increased risk of dying from heart disease with each 10 ppb increase in exposure, the investigators found. "About 130 million people are living in areas that exceed the National Ambient ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Heart Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Did Antarctic Explorer Shackleton Have a 'Hole in His Heart'?

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 – A century ago, British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton was a key figure in the race to explore Antarctica. Now, two expert physicians believe he may have done so while battling a hidden foe: a congenital heart defect. Shackleton made the first crossing of the mountains and glaciers on the island of South Georgia without any health problems, but suffered repeated bouts of breathlessness and weakness on subsequent Antarctic expeditions. The physical problems that plagued Shackleton have long been a mystery, however. In an attempt to solve it, retired anesthetist Dr. Ian Calder and consultant cardiologist Dr. Jan Till studied documents held at the Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge, England. The researchers concluded that Shackleton was born with a hole in his heart – an atrial septal defect. The two experts published their theory online recently in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Americans 100 and Older Are Living Even Longer Now

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 – The more than 72,000 Americans who have celebrated 100 birthdays or more are now surviving longer, a new federal report shows. Although death rates for centenarians were on the rise between 2000 and 2008, that has since changed, the study found. According to researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, death rates for the oldest Americans charted a steady decline between 2008 and 2014. This trend held for both genders and across races and ethnicities, the data showed. The leading causes of death for people living to be 100 have also shifted somewhat over the last decade. According to the CDC analysis, heart disease, stroke, flu/pneumonia, cancer and Alzheimer's disease were the top five leading causes of death for the oldest old in 2000. However, by 2014, "heart disease was still the leading cause of death, but Alzheimer's disease became ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Influenza, Ischemic Stroke, Pneumonia, Transient Ischemic Attack, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Ischemic Heart Disease

Race Not Tied to Threat of Second Stroke, Study Finds

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 – Younger black people are three times more likely to have a stroke than their white peers, but they may not be at greater risk for a second stroke, new research suggests. "The interaction between black race and age appears to be remarkably different for the risk of first versus second stroke," said study author George Howard, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "There was very little difference in race for the risk of a second stroke," he said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology. The seven-year study involved almost 30,000 people, including close to 3,000 with a history of stroke. Over the course of the study, about 300 of the people who had a previous stroke suffered another one. Meanwhile, just over 800 of the remaining people had their first stroke during the study period. By the age of 45, the black study participants with no ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Smoking, Atrial Fibrillation, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Myocardial Infarction, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Thromboembolic Stroke Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Post MI Syndrome, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Eating More Healthy Fats May Extend Life, Study Suggests

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 – For years, experts have preached the gospel of eating "healthy" fats and limiting "unhealthy" fats. Now, a new study contends that if people worldwide began to eat healthier fats, there might be more than a million fewer deaths from heart disease every year. Although a great deal of attention has been focused on reducing saturated fats from the diet, the researchers said the focus should be two-fold: reducing unhealthy fats such as saturated fat and trans fats, and replacing them with healthy fats, such as polyunsaturated fats. "Our findings highlight the importance of ending America's fear of all fat. We estimate that nearly 50,000 Americans die of heart disease each year due to low intake of vegetable oils," said Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, senior study author and dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. However, while the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Dietary Supplementation, Fish Oil, Lovaza, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Omega-3, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Omacor, Ischemic Heart Disease, MaxEPA, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Restora, Animi-3, Marine Lipid Concentrate, Omega 3-6-9 Complex, EPA Fish Oil, Mi-Omega NF

Slow Heart Rate Doesn't Mean Early Death Risk: Study

Posted 19 Jan 2016 by

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 – People with a slow heart rate don't have an increased risk for heart disease, a new study suggests. A typical heart rate for an adult at rest is 60 to 100 beats a minute, but in some people it's below 50 beats a minute, a condition called bradycardia, the researchers said. Because the heart may not be pumping enough blood throughout the body, this slow heart rate can lead to light-headedness, shortness of breath, fainting or chest pain. However, it hasn't been clear whether a slow pulse increases the risk of heart disease, according to the study authors. "For a large majority of people with a heart rate in the 40s or 50s who have no symptoms, the prognosis is very good," corresponding author Dr. Ajay Dharod, instructor in internal medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., said in a center news release. "Our results should be ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Bradyarrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Exercise Regularly and Your Heart Will Thank You

Posted 18 Jan 2016 by

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 – Regular exercise is essential for keeping your heart healthy, and the more the better, experts from the American College of Cardiology's Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council say. The study authors examined recent research and found that even small amounts of exercise, including standing, can reduce the risk of heart disease. Even greater reductions in risk can be achieved with more exercise, the researchers said. But only half of American adults get the recommended 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise a week, the report authors noted. The new research also reviewed recent studies that have suggested that excessive aerobic exercise – such as endurance races – may harm the heart. While that possibility warrants further investigation, current research shows that even for people with extremely high levels of training, the benefits of ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis

Study: Tissue Heart Valves Seem Best for Middle-Aged Patients

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2016 – Middle-aged heart valve replacement patients may have better outcomes if they receive valves made from animal tissue rather than metal, researchers report. The investigators analyzed 13 studies that compared metal and tissue valves in patients aged 40 to 70 who had aortic valve replacement. Heart valves are designed to allow blood to flow in only one direction through the heart. The two types of valves studied have different risks and benefits, the authors of the report explained. Metal (mechanical) valves last longer but are more likely to cause blood clots. So patients have to take blood-thinning drugs for the rest of their lives, which can increase the risk of major bleeding, the study authors said. Tissue (bioprosthetic) valves are less likely to cause blood clots, but they may need to be replaced at some point, the authors added. Fifteen years after ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prosthetic Heart Valves, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Mitral Insufficiency, Aortic Stenosis, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Tissue Valves, Mitral Stenosis, Valvular Heart Disease, Aortic Insufficiency

Statins Aid Bypass Surgery Recovery, Research Shows

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 – Patients who take statins before and after heart bypass surgery have fewer complications and a reduced risk of dying during and soon after the operation, a new analysis finds. In a review of recent studies on the use of statins (such as Lipitor or Zocor) before and after bypass surgery, researchers found that the cholesterol-lowering drugs reduced the incidence of the abnormal heartbeat atrial fibrillation by 58 percent. In addition, statins also reduced the risk of dying in the hospital after the operation by 43 percent. "We think statins have these effects because they reduce inflammation," said researcher Dr. Islam Elgendy, of the division of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Florida, Gainesville. "Right after bypass surgery, there is intense inflammation of the heart," he added. "Perhaps starting statins two weeks before the surgery reduces the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Angina, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Lescol, Ischemic Heart Disease, Lescol XL, Mevacor, Pitavastatin, Baycol

Even Slight Kidney Decline May Affect Heart

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2016 – Even a slight decline in kidney function can lead to heart damage, a new study suggests. "Mild chronic kidney disease is common, affecting over 10 percent of the U.S. population, so if kidney disease really is a cause of heart disease it may be a major public health problem," said study senior author Dr. Jonathan Townend, a professor of cardiology at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham in England. The study, published Jan. 11 in the journal Hypertension, included 68 living kidney donors, average age 47, who were followed for a year after donating their kidney. They were compared with a control group of 56 people, average age 44, who did not donate a kidney. Compared to those in the control group, the kidney donors had an expected decrease in kidney function, an increase in the mass of the heart's left ventricle (a strong predictor of heart disease risk), and a ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Chronic Kidney Disease

Exercise May Lower Heart Disease Risk in Depressed People: Study

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2016 – Exercise may reduce the chances of developing heart disease for people with depression, a new study suggests. Depressed people who weren't physically active had stiffer and more inflamed aortas – the large artery carrying blood from the heart – two signs of heart disease. But, in depressed people who exercised, aortic stiffening and inflammation were less common, the study authors found. "Depression and physical inactivity have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, who reviewed the study's findings. "Although associations [in the study] were found between depression and artery function, which was improved in people who exercise regularly, additional studies are needed before we can conclude that exercise reduces heart disease ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Heart Disease

Childhood Cancer Treatment May Raise Adult Heart Disease Risk

Posted 5 Jan 2016 by

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 – Children who survive cancer may face a higher risk of heart disease as adults, new research suggests. The lingering effects of the treatments that saved their lives as children may trigger the development of heart abnormalities that might not cause apparent symptoms, the researchers explained. The investigators found that heart disease appears to affect between 3 percent and 24 percent of pediatric cancer survivors by the time they reach their 30s. Those figures rose to between 10 and 37 percent among patients 40 and older, the study found. However, while the study revealed a link between childhood cancer treatment and later heart disease, it didn't prove cause-and-effect. "The prevalence of these cardiac findings might be expected in an older adult population, but not necessarily in this young a population," said study lead author Dr. Daniel Mulrooney. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Methotrexate, Fluorouracil, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Xeloda, Cardiomyopathy, Hydroxyurea, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Mercaptopurine, Hydrea, Carboplatin, Cisplatin, Cytoxan, Dacogen, Bendamustine, Cyclophosphamide, Temodar, Oxaliplatin, Gemzar

Page 1 2 ...5 6 7 8 9 ... Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Arrhythmia, Cardiomyopathy, Ischemic Heart Disease, Endocarditis, Pericarditis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Heart Murmur, Hemopericardium, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Related Drug Support Groups

evening primrose, Primrose Oil, Evening Primrose Oil, capsicum