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Heart Disease News (Page 7)

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Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

Posted 10 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Walking at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is an excellent form of exercise, but research has been mixed on how successful a walking program can be in changing biological markers such as cholesterol, weight, blood pressure," said Pamela Stewart Fahs. She is associate dean, professor, and chair in rural nursing at the Binghamton University Decker School of Nursing in New York. For the study, Fahs and a graduate student tracked 70 women in a rural area of New York state. The study participants were asked to walk briskly at least 150 minutes a week for 10 weeks. The women ranged in age from 29 to 79, and had an average age of 55. At the start of the study, the researchers calculated the women's risk of a heart attack within the next 10 years. Halfway through the 10 weeks, the participants were given ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, High Cholesterol, Ischemic Heart Disease, Infectious Heart Disease

Tobacco Use Costs World 6 Million Lives, $1 Trillion Annually: Report

Posted 10 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Smoking kills about 6 million people a year, and costs the world more than $1 trillion a year in health care expenses and lost productivity, a new report says. But, billions of dollars and millions of lives could be saved through higher tobacco prices and taxes, according to the report from the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Besides reducing the risk of cancer and heart disease, such tobacco-control policies could raise large amounts of money for governments to use for health and economic development, the study authors said. "The economic impact of tobacco on countries, and the general public, is huge, as this new report shows," said Dr. Oleg Chestnov. He is WHO's assistant director-general for noncommunicable diseases and mental health. "The tobacco industry produces and markets products that kill millions of people ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Smoking, Heart Disease, Smoking Cessation, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Nicotine, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Nicorette, Nicoderm CQ, Diabetes Mellitus, Nicotrol Inhaler, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Commit, Habitrol, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Nicotrol TD, Nicorelief, Nicorette DS

Lots of Red Meat May Be Tied to Gut Disorder in Men

Posted 10 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Men who eat a lot of red meat may have a higher risk of a painful inflammatory condition of the colon, a new study suggests. The disorder, called diverticulitis, causes severe abdominal pain, nausea and constipation. And it can lead to complications such as tears or blockages in the colon. The new study found that men who ate the most red meat were 58 percent more likely to develop diverticulitis, compared to men who ate the least. The findings don't prove cause-and-effect, stressed senior researcher Dr. Andrew Chan, a gastroenterologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. On the other hand, he said, there are already reasons to think about cutting down on red meat. Heavy consumption has been tied to higher risks of heart disease and certain cancers, Chan pointed out. "This study offers one more reason to consider limiting the red meat in your diet," ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Smoking, Heart Disease, Smoking Cessation, Diverticulitis, Colorectal Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Diverticulitis with Hemorrhage

'Weekend Warriors' Can Still Stretch Their Life Spans

Posted 9 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Weekend warriors take heart. You may add almost as many years to your life span as those who work out all week long, new research suggests. "One or two sessions per week of moderate- or vigorous-intensity leisure time physical activity was sufficient to reduce death from all causes, from cardiovascular disease and from cancer," said study author Gary O'Donovan. He is a research associate with the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine at Loughborough University in England. In general, exercise is believed to boost longevity. But, there's more to be learned about how the frequency of exercise plays into that equation, O'Donovan noted, and that's what the new study examined. "On average, habitual exercisers live a couple of years longer than their peers who do not regularly exercise," he said. "What's more important, arguably, is that habitual exercisers ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Plant-Based Diets Score Big for Healthy Weight Loss

Posted 4 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 – If you've resolved to eat healthy and lose weight in 2017, a new report suggests the DASH diet may be your best bet. For the seventh year in a row, U.S. News & World Report has named the plant-based eating plan as the best choice overall, followed by the Mediterranean diet, up from fourth place last year. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, but its benefits go beyond preventing high blood pressure, the report found. The DASH and the Mediterranean diets, as well as most of the other recommended diets, focus on eating whole grains, fruits, vegetables, low- or no-fat dairy, lean meats, poultry and fish. They also recommend nuts, seeds and legumes (beans). But these diets limit or exclude most fats and sweets, and recommend modest portions, according to Dr. David Katz. He is president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine and a member ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect'

Posted 27 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 – Hospitalized patients have a higher risk of cardiac arrest and transfers to intensive care if they're in wards when other patients have recently suffered similar emergencies, a new study suggests. "This should serve as a wake-up call for hospital-based physicians," study author Dr. Matthew Churpek, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, said in a university news release. "After caring for a patient who becomes critically ill on the hospital wards, we should routinely check to see how the other patients on the unit are doing," he said. "Following these high-intensity events, our to-do list should include a thorough assessment of the other patients on the unit, to make sure none of them are at risk of slipping through the cracks," he added. Churpek's team tracked outcomes for adult patients who were admitted to the University of Chicago ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Arrhythmia, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Health Tip: When a Child Is Sick

Posted 26 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

-- The common cold and a mild flu don't usually require a trip to the doctor. But parents should look for warning signs that your child needs a checkup. The American Academy of Family Physicians says a doctor visit is a good idea if your child has: A fever that's above 103 degrees Fahrenheit or persists for more than three days. Cold or flu symptoms that persist beyond 10 days, or flu symptoms that initially improve but then worsen. Wheezing, trouble breathing or skin that appears blue. Discharge from the ear or complaints of ear pain, or pain in the abdomen or vomiting. Seizures, irritable behavior or difficulty waking. Diabetes, heart disease or another chronic condition that gets worse. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Bacterial Infection, Influenza, Heart Disease, Otitis Media, Cold Symptoms, Bacterial Skin Infection, Sore Throat, Diabetes Mellitus, Infection Prophylaxis, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Women Chasing Holiday Perfection May Miss Signs of Heart Trouble

Posted 23 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 – Holiday pressure can stress anybody out, but some women get so anxious about making everything perfect that they miss the signs of serious heart problems. One of those threats is a so-called "silent heart attack." "Most of the time people who are experiencing a heart attack will have pain in the chest, shortness of breath, etc. Silent heart attack symptoms might be as simple as indigestion, flu-like symptoms, or feeling discomfort like a pulled muscle in the chest or back," said Dr. Karla Kurrelmeyer, a cardiologist at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center. It's important to have these symptoms checked as soon as possible to avoid scarring or damage to the heart, she said in a hospital news release. Another condition, known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy, can strike women when they're under great stress and hit with a traumatic life event like the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Cardiology Still a Man's Field, Survey Finds

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 – Most cardiologists in the United States are men, and many female cardiologists report discrimination in the workplace, a new survey finds. "We need to increase the diversity of our workforce, and find ways to recruit higher numbers of women and underrepresented minorities," said survey senior author Dr. Claire Duvernoy, chair of the Women in Cardiology Council at the American College of Cardiology (ACC). The council conducted the survey. "We must work to change the culture that allows this to occur in our field," Duvernoy added. The poll included more than 1,300 male and almost 1,000 female cardiologists. The findings revealed that the percentage of women reporting workplace discrimination fell from 71 percent to 65 percent in the past 20 years, but that rate is still three times higher than it is among men. Women were more likely to report discrimination ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Cured Meats Could Aggravate Asthma, Study Suggests

Posted 21 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 – Regularly eating cured meats such as ham and salami might aggravate asthma, researchers report. Looking at close to 1,000 people with the respiratory disease, French researchers found that those who ate the most processed and cured meats were 76 percent more likely to see their asthma symptoms worsen over time compared to those who ate the least. These symptoms include trouble breathing, chest tightness and shortness of breath, according to the report. Cured meats are high in chemicals called nitrites to keep them from spoiling. These meats have been linked to a higher risk of other chronic diseases, including cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In addition, they were recently classified as carcinogenic, or cancer-causing, by the World Health Organization (WHO), said the study's lead researcher, Dr. Zhen Li. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Heart Disease, Asthma - Maintenance, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Allergic Asthma

Women Fare Better Than Men After a Heart Valve Replacement

Posted 19 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 – Women have a higher survival rate than men after a specific type of heart valve replacement procedure, a new study finds. The procedure is called a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Researchers looked at information from more than 23,000 heart patients. They all had TAVR between 2011 and 2014. The study included nearly an equal number of women and men. Even though women had more complications after the procedure, their chances of survival over the next year were higher than for men. The reasons for this aren't clear, the study authors said. The study was published Dec. 19 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. TAVR is a minimally invasive method used on high-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Patients with this condition can undergo one of three treatments: TAVR; surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR); or medical therapy, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prosthetic Heart Valves, Mitral Valve Prolapse, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Mechanical Valves, Mitral Insufficiency, Aortic Stenosis, Prosthetic Heart Valves - Tissue Valves, Mitral Stenosis, Aortic Insufficiency, Valvular Heart Disease

Chemo More Damaging to Hearts of Diabetics: Study

Posted 18 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 – A small study finds that cancer patients who have diabetes may suffer worse heart damage from chemotherapy, potentially boosting their risk of heart failure. There are increasing reports of toxic effects to the heart – also known as cardiotoxicity – due to chemotherapy with drugs known as anthracyclines, said study lead author Dr. Ana Catarina Gomes. Such drugs include doxorubicin (Doxil) and epirubicin (Ellence). Gomes is a cardiologist in training at the Hospital Garcia de Orta in Almada, Portugal. According to Gomes, this is "mainly because a smaller proportion of patients now die from cancer. In the coming years, this cardiotoxicity looks set to increase the burden of heart failure in cancer survivors." However, she said, "the good news is that cardiotoxicity can be reversible in the early stages before overt heart failure develops." The new study tracked ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Doxorubicin, Adriamycin, Epirubicin, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Adriamycin PFS, Ellence, Pharmorubicin RDF, Adriamycin RDF, Pharmorubicin PFS

Smartphones Could Be a Boon to Heart Health Research

Posted 14 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 – Smartphones might revolutionize cardiac research by giving instant, accurate insight into the physical activity of people using them, a new study finds. "People check these devices [an average of] 46 times a day," noted study senior author Dr. Euan Ashley, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. "From a cardiovascular health standpoint, we can use that personal attachment to measure physical activity, heart rate and more," he said in a university news release. In the study, Ashley's team enlisted subjects via a free iPhone app called MyHeart Counts. The researchers enrolled more than 47,000 Americans across all 50 states, and were able to track data about the physical activity of nearly 5,000 participants who took a six-minute walking fitness test. "The ultimate goals of the MyHeart Counts study are to ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Where You Live May Determine How You Die

Posted 13 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 – People along the southern stretch of the Mississippi River are more likely to die from heart problems than anywhere else in the United States. Suicide and homicide will claim the most lives in the southwestern part of the country. Deaths from chronic respiratory diseases are greatest in eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia. And mental and substance abuse disorders cause the most deaths in Alaska, eastern Arizona, New Mexico, eastern Kentucky and southwestern West Virginia. What causes a person's death depends in large part on where they spend their lives, concludes a new county-level analysis of U.S. mortality data. Armed with this sort of information, county and city health departments can focus their efforts on the specific problems affecting their communities, said lead researcher Ali Mokdad. He is a professor with the department of global health at ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Major Depressive Disorder, Opiate Withdrawal, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Smoking, Heart Disease, Drug Dependence, Smoking Cessation, Agitation, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia, Substance Abuse, Alcoholism, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Aggressive Behavior

Certain Breast Cancer Drugs Tied to Blood Vessel Damage

Posted 9 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 – Women on breast cancer drugs called aromatase inhibitors may show signs of early blood vessel damage that could lead to heart disease, a small study suggests. Researchers found that compared with healthy women their age, women on aromatase inhibitors were more likely to show signs of "endothelial dysfunction." That refers to problems in how the blood vessel lining responds to blood flow. The findings are based on just 36 women who were prescribed the drugs. And experts stressed it's too early to know what to make of the results. Still, the study adds to evidence linking aromatase inhibitors to elevated risks of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and possibly full-blown heart disease. Aromatase inhibitors include the drugs Aromasin (exemestane), Arimidex (anastrozole) and Femara (letrozole). These drugs work by lowering a woman's estrogen levels, and are often ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Breast Cancer, Arimidex, Femara, Anastrozole, Breast Cancer, Metastatic, Letrozole, Aromasin, Exemestane, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Osteolytic Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer, Teslac, Testolactone, Infectious Heart Disease

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