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Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

Poverty Harder on Women's Hearts, Research Shows

Posted 23 hours ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 – Poor women are more likely to suffer heart trouble than poor men are, a new review suggests. Researchers analyzed 116 studies that included 22 million people in North America, Europe, Asia and Australasia. The findings showed that among poor people, women had a 25 percent higher risk of heart attack than men. "It's widely known that people from disadvantaged backgrounds are at greater risk of heart attack and stroke than people with more affluent backgrounds," said Sanne Peters, a research fellow at The George Institute for Global Health in Oxford, England. "However, our study has shown there is a significant difference between the sexes. More disadvantaged women are suffering from heart disease than their male counterparts, which is concerning," Peters added in an institute news release. "We need to examine why this is happening and make sure women are able to ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Food Stamp Use Linked to Raised Early Death Risk in Study

Posted 1 day 16 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – Americans who use or are eligible for food stamps have a higher risk of premature death than people who aren't eligible for them, a new study finds. "Our results suggest that the millions of low-income Americans who rely on SNAP for food assistance require even greater support to improve their health than they currently receive," said study senior author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian. He is dean of Tufts University's School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. Mozaffarian's team looked at data from 2000 to 2011. There was information on nearly 500,000 adults aged 25 and older who received benefits from the federal government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). SNAP benefits are commonly called food stamps. The investigators found that people who used food stamps had a three times higher risk of death from diabetes. The program participants also ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Weight Loss/Failure to Thrive, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cachexia, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

Truckers' Poor Health: An Accident Waiting to Happen?

Posted 1 day 23 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – Truck drivers spend long hours behind the wheel and often eat less-than-healthy food at roadside stops. These behaviors can raise their risk of multiple health conditions, which boost their chances of getting into a crash, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from more than 49,000 commercial truck drivers and found that 34 percent had at least one of several health problems – such as heart disease, low back pain and diabetes – that have been linked with poor driving performance. Truck drivers with three or more of the flagged medical conditions were two to four times more likely to be in a crash than their healthier peers, the University of Utah researchers found. For example, the rate of crashes resulting in injury among all truck drivers was 29 per 100 million miles traveled, but was 93 per 100 million miles traveled for drivers with three or ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Obesity, Back Pain, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Weight Loss, Bystolic, Excedrin, Bisoprolol, Fioricet, Insulin Resistance, Tylenol PM, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Pre-Diabetes, Fiorinal, Tenormin, Advil PM, Metoprolol Succinate ER

17 Million US Adults May Have Tough-to-Spot High Blood Pressure

Posted 1 day 23 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – You get your blood pressure checked at your doctor's office, and it reads in the normal range. You're fine, right? Well, maybe not. A new study suggests that 17 million American adults may have what doctors call "masked" hypertension – blood pressure that tends to be higher outside of the medical clinic environment. "It can manifest itself as a normal physician's office blood pressure and elevated home blood pressure," explained Dr. Kevin Marzo, a heart specialist who reviewed the findings. The best way to spot masked hypertension is "either with self-monitoring or an ambulatory [wearable] blood pressure monitor that a physician has a patient wear for 24 hours," said Marzo. He's chief of cardiology at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. But how common is the condition? To find out, a team led by Dr. Joseph Schwartz of Stony Brook University in Stony ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Ramipril, Cozaar, Micardis, Valsartan, Enalapril, Benazepril, Avapro, Atacand, Pre-Diabetes, Irbesartan, Perindopril, Telmisartan, Candesartan

Too Much Sitting Ages You Faster

Posted 2 days 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 – You might age a lot faster if you sit too much, a new study warns. Researchers who assessed nearly 1,500 older women found those who sat most of the day and got little exercise had cells that were biologically older by eight years than the women's actual age. "Our study found cells age faster with a sedentary lifestyle. Chronological age doesn't always match biological age," said lead author Aladdin Shadyab. He's from the University of California, San Diego's School of Medicine. The women, aged 64 to 95, answered questionnaires and wore a device for seven days to track their activity levels. The study doesn't establish a cause-and-effect relationship between accelerated aging and lack of exercise. Still, "discussions about the benefits of exercise should start when we are young, and physical activity should continue to be part of our daily lives as we get ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Heart Disease, Smoking, Weight Loss, Smoking Cessation, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Higher Risk of Heart Disease for Blacks in Poorer Neighborhoods

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Black Americans who live in poor neighborhoods are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke than those who live in wealthier areas, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data collected from black men and women in Jackson, Miss., who participated in a government-funded study between 2000 and 2011. They also reviewed information collected in the 2000 U.S. Census. Every decrease on a scale of socioeconomic status was associated with a 25 percent rise in heart disease risk, the researchers found. When the researchers assessed violence and disorder levels in neighborhoods, there was a similar increase in risk of heart disease for each negative step on the scale. But, the research didn't prove neighborhood conditions caused poor health. "For decades, centuries, even, researchers have linked adverse neighborhood economic and social conditions to health," said ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Monkey Study Boosts Theory That Fewer Calories Can Extend Life

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – A calorie-restricted diet helps monkeys live longer, healthier lives, a new study suggests. Previously, research teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the U.S. National Institute on Aging (NIA) conducted separate calorie-restricted diet studies on rhesus monkeys. But the two teams had different findings. In 2009, the UW-Madison study team concluded that a calorie-restricted diet led to significant benefits in survival and reductions in cancer, heart disease and insulin resistance for monkeys. Meanwhile, a 2012 NIA study found that restricting calories in the diet didn't significantly improve survival. But the NIA study said that calorie restriction did improve health. The conflicting outcomes "cast a shadow of doubt" on how calorie restriction might help to understand aging, said study co-corresponding author Rozalyn Anderson, an associate ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Cancer, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Insulin Resistance, Ischemic Heart Disease

Medical Groups Raise Blood Pressure Rx Threshold for Healthy Adults Over 60

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 – Two leading medical organizations are recommending a less aggressive target for the treatment of high blood pressure in adults 60 and older who are otherwise healthy. Traditionally, the threshold for high blood pressure has been set at 140 mmHg systolic blood pressure (the top number in a reading). But the new guideline says doctors should now begin treatment when adults 60 and older have persistent systolic blood pressure that's at or above 150 mmHg, to reduce their risk of heart problems, stroke and death. A less aggressive target like this offers a suitable balance of benefits and potential harms for these patients, according to the new guideline from the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Any additional benefit from more aggressive treatment is small, the groups say. Doctors specializing in the cardiac ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Lisinopril, Hypertension, Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Propranolol, Benicar, Diovan, Bystolic, Carvedilol, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Inderal, Cozaar, Coreg, Micardis, Enalapril, Valsartan

Can Coffee Perk Up Heart Health, Too?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 – The caffeine in your morning cup of joe may do more than jolt you awake – it may also help dampen the type of inflammation that's linked to heart disease risk factors, a new study suggests. Researchers found that an inflammatory mechanism was dialed up in certain older adults, but not others. When it was highly activated, people often had high blood pressure and stiff arteries. But in lab experiments, there was evidence that caffeine blocked this inflammatory process. No one, however, is saying that morning cup of coffee is a magic bullet against aging. Still, the findings might help explain why past studies have linked higher caffeine intake to a longer life, said lead researcher David Furman, of Stanford University School of Medicine. The human body has "probably hundreds of pathways" that contribute to chronic inflammation and various diseases, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Caffeine, Excedrin, Fioricet, Alert, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Fiorinal with Codeine, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Esgic, Norgesic, Esgic-Plus, Fioricet with Codeine, Headache Relief, Keep Going, Acetaminophen/Butalbital/Caffeine, Excedrin Extra Strength, Norgesic Forte

Rural Americans at Higher Risk of 5 Preventable Causes of Death: CDC

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 – Americans who live in rural areas have a higher risk of death from five leading causes than people who live in urban locations, a federal study reveals. In 2014, there were many potentially preventable deaths among rural Americans, including 25,000 from heart disease, 19,000 from cancer, 12,000 from accidental injuries, 11,000 from chronic lower respiratory disease and 4,000 from stroke, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "This new study shows there is a striking gap in health between rural and urban Americans. To close this gap, we are working to better understand and address the health threats that put rural Americans at increased risk of early death," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in an agency news release. About 46 million Americans – 15 percent of the nation's population – live in rural areas. Several factors – ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Cancer, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Smoking, Ischemic Stroke, Smoking Cessation, Transient Ischemic Attack, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Wearable Sensors May Spot Illness Before Symptoms Start

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 – Wearable sensors to track things such as heart rate, activity and skin temperature may help you keep track of your health and warn you of impending illness, a new study suggests. Researchers recently compiled almost 2 billion measurements from 60 people. The idea is to determine baseline medical information about the participants. "We want to study people at an individual level," study senior author Michael Snyder, chair of genetics at Stanford University School of Medicine in California, said in a university news release. The participants in the study didn't need to wear specially designed sensors. Instead, they wore as few as one – or as many as seven – activity monitors that are commercially available. The monitors grabbed more than 250,000 measurements a day, including: weight; heart rate; oxygen in the blood; skin temperature; activity, such as sleep ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Diabetes, Type 1, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Intravenous Insulin Drip

Senate Starts Obamacare Repeal Process

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 – The Republican-controlled U.S. Senate took the first step early Thursday morning of dismantling the Affordable Care Act, the controversial health reform law that has been a centerpiece of the Obama administration. By a 51-48 vote, a GOP-backed budget resolution sets a Jan. 27 deadline for a draft of a repeal of what is commonly called Obamacare. A House vote on the resolution could happen as early as Friday, The New York Times reported. The Senate resolution avoids the possibility of a filibuster by Democrats on any repeal legislation. The resolution creates special budget rules that would allow the repeal vote to proceed with a simple majority in the 100-member Senate, instead of 60 votes, the Associated Press reported. Some Republicans in Congress have said they are wary of repealing the Affordable Care Act without a replacement health care plan at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

'Stress Ball' in Your Brain May Be Key to Heart Risks

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Doctors have long known that a stressed life does no favors for the heart, and new research may help unravel why that's so. A Harvard team says heightened activity in a key part of the brain may explain why stress boosts people's odds for heart disease and stroke. The finding "raises the possibility that reducing stress could produce benefits that extend beyond an improved sense of psychological well-being," said study lead author Dr. Ahmed Tawakol, who co-directs the cardiac imaging program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. One neurologist agreed that the research could have real value for patients. "This study provides information that can help us better understand the mechanisms in which the body and the brain affect each other," said Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein. He is president of the Brain & Behavior Foundation in New York City. "A better ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Intermittent Claudication, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Body Imaging, Post MI Syndrome, Head Imaging

Government-Backed Salt Reduction Efforts Could Deliver Big Health Pay Day

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Government-supported policies to reduce people's salt consumption are highly cost-effective worldwide, a new study reports. "We know that excess dietary salt causes hundreds of thousands of cardiovascular deaths each year," said study senior author Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian. He's dean of Tufts University's Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. "The trillion-dollar question has been how to start to bring salt down, and how much such an effort would cost," Mozaffarian said in a university news release. Study first author Michael Webb is a doctoral student in economics at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. He said, "We found that a government-supported national plan to reduce salt would be cost-effective in nearly every country in the world. This was true even if we assumed the estimated costs were much greater or the benefits less ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Rhinaris, Hyper-Sal, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Thermotabs, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Salinex, Broncho Saline, NebuSal, Saljet Sterile, Altamist, Lymphoseek Diluent, Simply Saline

Brisk Walk May Help Sidestep Heart Disease

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Walking at moderate intensity may lower the risk of heart disease, a small study suggests. "We know walking is an excellent form of exercise, but research has been mixed on how successful a walking program can be in changing biological markers such as cholesterol, weight, blood pressure," said Pamela Stewart Fahs. She is associate dean, professor, and chair in rural nursing at the Binghamton University Decker School of Nursing in New York. For the study, Fahs and a graduate student tracked 70 women in a rural area of New York state. The study participants were asked to walk briskly at least 150 minutes a week for 10 weeks. The women ranged in age from 29 to 79, and had an average age of 55. At the start of the study, the researchers calculated the women's risk of a heart attack within the next 10 years. Halfway through the 10 weeks, the participants were given ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Weight Loss, Ischemic Heart Disease, Infectious Heart Disease

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