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Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

Heart Disease: A Price Humans Pay for Fertility?

Posted 2 days 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 – Certain genes linked to heart disease may also improve your chances of having children, a new study suggests. Australian researchers said the findings seem to offer a potential explanation for why evolution has allowed these genes to persist for centuries. While lifestyle is clearly important in heart disease risk, scientists have found many genes also influence those odds. "Genes play a very important role in coronary artery disease risk across an individual's lifetime," said study author Sean Byars, a research fellow at the University of Melbourne. In fact, it's estimated that genes account for about 50 percent of the risk. The rest, he said, is due to other factors, including habits like smoking and eating a poor diet. Heart disease is a major killer worldwide, and it has long plagued humanity. Scientists have found evidence of clogged arteries in Egyptian ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Female Infertility, Ovulation Induction, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Primary Ovarian Failure, Follicle Stimulation

Too Few Women, Docs Understand Dangers of Heart Disease

Posted 2 days 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 – Heart disease is the leading killer of U.S. women, but many women and their doctors don't recognize the danger. A survey of more than 1,000 women between 25 and 60 years of age found 45 percent were unaware that heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death for women in America. Most respondents said they had had a checkup in the past year, but only 40 percent said the doctor had assessed their heart health. "Eighty percent of heart disease is preventable, yet women's heart disease is underdiagnosed, under-researched and underfunded," said British Robinson, head of the Women's Heart Alliance, a nonprofit organization that paid for the study. "It is critical that women ask their health care providers to check their hearts and that health care providers know that when it comes to heart disease, men and women are different – women's hearts are smaller, their risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Are You at Risk for Metabolic Syndrome?

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 – Scientists have identified a group of specific factors that increase your risk for heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, all of which are severe health threats. The name for these risk factors is metabolic syndrome. Think of them as a wake-up call for getting healthier. The first risk factor is a large waistline, or excess fat in the belly area, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. This is the only visible sign. The second risk factor is high triglycerides, a type of fat found in your blood. The third is a low level of HDL – or high-density lipoprotein – cholesterol, the so-called good cholesterol. The fourth risk factor is high blood pressure, and the fifth is a high level of sugar in your blood. It only takes three of these risk factors for you to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. And once you have metabolic syndrome, you're ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Hypertensive Emergency

Leading Medical Groups Mobilize Against Obamacare Repeal

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 – Patients must have access to affordable and adequate care as part of any change to U.S. health coverage, eight major advocacy groups say. The groups – representing patients, consumers and health providers – fear the American Health Care Act (AHCA) approved by Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives would impose added costs and risks on many Americans. Replacing the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, was a centerpiece of the GOP's 2016 election platform. To highlight the issue, the medical groups plan a series of events to urge the Senate to put patients first and reject the AHCA. Senate Republicans are currently working on a health-care reform bill of their own. "The American Health Care Act would jeopardize health coverage for tens of millions of Americans, while making deep cuts to Medicaid. We are proud to join with our partners in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Uncertainty for Obamacare Plans as Filing Deadline Approaches

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 – Even as U.S. Senate Republicans hammer out a bill to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) this week, a deadline looms that should reveal what insurance plan options and premiums millions of Americans might face next year. In the coming days, insurers in some ACA ("Obamacare") marketplaces could decide not to participate, limiting consumer choices in some markets and boosting rates for some, health policy and financial analysts say. "You'll have many folks with fewer plan choices, higher prices and then, of course, in the worst case, no coverage at all," Sabrina Corlette told reporters during a Commonwealth Fund briefing Monday afternoon. She is a research professor at Georgetown University's Center on Health Insurance Reforms. Already, insurers in a number of markets across the country have decided to pull up stakes. To date, 38,000 consumers in 47 counties ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

Meds Rooted in Ancient China May Help Heart: Review

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 12, 2017 – Traditional Chinese herbal medications might have a role to play in treating or preventing heart disease in the West, a research review suggests. Heart disease and stroke remain major killers worldwide, accounting for 17.3 million deaths a year, according to the World Heart Federation. This unrelenting death toll has prompted scientists to look to the ancient East for inspiration. Investigators in China reviewed 56 rigorously conducted studies that examined use of medications rooted in traditional Chinese medicine for conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and narrowing or hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis). Chinese herbal medications might help prevent or treat these conditions, the researchers noted. For patients who can't tolerate or afford high blood pressure medications, the research suggested some herbal alternatives: tiankuijiangya, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Patient's Education Level May Be Key to Heart Risk

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 12, 2017 – How far people go in school seems to be linked to their odds for heart disease, new research suggests. A team led by Dr. Yasuhiko Kubota, of the University of Minnesota, tracked data from nearly 14,000 white and black Americans, followed from 1987 through 2013. For men, the risk of cardiovascular disease – coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke – between ages 45 to 85 ranged from 59 percent for those with a grade school education, to 42 percent for those who'd earned a graduate degree. Among women, nearly 51 percent of those with a grade school education had heart disease, compared to just 28 percent of those who'd completed graduate school, the findings showed. The study couldn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship, but Kubota's team noted that the finding remained even after they adjusted for other factors, such as income, occupation or how well ... Read more

Related support groups: Lisinopril, Metoprolol, Amlodipine, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Diltiazem, Bystolic, Lasix, Norvasc, Verapamil, Furosemide, Ramipril, Bisoprolol, Nifedipine, Cozaar, Valsartan, Micardis

Snake Venom May One Day Help Heart Patients

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 8, 2017 – Scary pit vipers may need an image upgrade: Their venom might end up helping human heart patients, research suggests. Taiwanese scientists say a blood thinner drug based on venom from the Wagler's pit viper was effective in mice, and might prove safer than current anti-clotting meds for humans one day. The serpent-medicine connection isn't new, one cardiologist noted, since venom typically kills by disrupting the blood's clotting mechanisms. "Blood thinner medications have a long and storied history with snake venom," said Dr Satjit Bhysri, a heart specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. In fact, "many current blood thinners are based on initial experiments from proteins found in snake venom," he added. In the new study, a team led by Tur-Fu Huang, a pharmacology researcher at National Taiwan University, focused on the venom of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Advances Against Heart Disease Haven't Reached America's Poor: Studies

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 7, 2017 – Americans have made major strides in reducing heart disease, but two new studies suggest one group – the poor – still lags behind. Risk of heart disease among middle-class and rich Americans declined 20 percent between 1999 and 2014, researchers said. But those levels changed little among the poor, who are as likely to have high blood pressure, to smoke and have other risk factors for heart disease and stroke as they did 15 or 20 years ago, the researchers found. "Adults in all income strata have not benefited equally from efforts to improve control of cardiovascular risk factors in the United States," said Dr. Ayodele Odutayo, lead researcher of one of the studies. Public health must focus on reducing income disparities in cardiovascular risk factors, particularly blood pressure and smoking, said Odutayo. He is with St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. "This ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Is White Bread OK for Some People?

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – For years, you probably have been told that wheat bread is far better for you than its white counterpart, but a small, new study suggests that maxim may not hold true for everyone. Researchers looked at how quickly blood sugar levels rose after eating (a process called the glycemic response) either white bread or sourdough-leavened wheat bread. The researchers found that the response seemed to vary by person, and that some people didn't have a bad glycemic response to white bread. "Our study suggests that, in terms of glycemic responses, different people respond differently to even the same meal," explained study author Eran Segal, from the Weitzman Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. "In the context of white bread, this means that some people respond badly to white bread and should probably avoid it, while others have a healthy response to it, given what ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Heart Disease, Weight Loss

4 in 10 Job-Based Health Plans in U.S. Are Now 'High-Deductible'

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 – High-deductible health plans are gaining ground among U.S. adults with employer-sponsored health insurance coverage. But too often, enrollees say high out-of-pocket costs are causing them to skip or delay needed medical care, a new government report finds. Nearly 40 percent of adults with job-based coverage were enrolled in a high-deductible plan in 2016, the report said. That's up from just over 26 percent in 2011, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, a unit of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Increasingly, employers are adding high-deductible health plans to the menu of health plan choices they offer employees, or they're replacing traditional offerings with high-deductible plans, said Paul Fronstin, who was not involved in the report. He's director of the nonpartisan Employee Benefit Research Institute's health research ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Cancer, Heart Disease, Breast Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Americans Buying Less Salt-Laden Foods

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 5, 2017 – Americans' addiction to salt may be waning, as food manufacturers gradually cut amounts in their products and consumers opt for less salty fare, a new study suggests. A survey of more than 172,000 households found that between 2000 and 2014 the amount of salt in the packaged food and drinks people bought was reduced by nearly 400 milligrams (mg) a day, dropping from more than 2,300 mg to less than 2,000 mg a day. At the same time, the salt content of packaged foods consumers purchased decreased 12 percent, said lead researcher Jennifer Poti, a nutritional epidemiologist and research assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "Our findings suggest that U.S. households are getting less sodium from the grocery store than they did 15 years ago, yet sodium levels in packaged foods are still too high," she said. The researchers also found ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Hyper-Sal, Rhinaris, Saline Nasal Mist, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Thermotabs, Afrin Saline, Buffered Salt, Thermoject, Saljet Rinse

Can a 70-Year-Old Have the Arteries of a 20-Year-Old?

Posted 30 May 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 – Imagine having the clear, supple, healthy blood vessels of a 20-year-old in your 70s. It's possible, but "challenging," a new study suggests. Still, if you eat right, exercise and stay trim, you have a shot at offsetting age-related blood vessel degeneration, according to this study of more than 3,000 adults. Genetics played less of a role than lifestyle in keeping blood vessels young, the researchers found. Over time, blood vessels stiffen and blood pressure rises, leading to a significant risk for heart disease and stroke, said Dr. Teemu Niiranen. He is a research fellow at Boston University School of Medicine and the Framingham Heart Study. "We didn't find any magic bullet that kept people's blood vessels young," he said. "It seems that these are people who just lead a very healthy lifestyle." Heart disease is really a lifestyle disease, Niiranen explained. ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Hypertensive Heart Disease

Meth Addicts' Hearts May Improve If They Quit

Posted 30 May 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 29, 2017 – Methamphetamine users who quit the drug may get a break: New research suggests it's possible to reverse heart damage with proper medical treatment. Research has previously linked meth use to heart problems that can contribute to death. But it hadn't been clear if stopping the drug use resulted in better heart health. The small study found that after discontinuing methamphetamine use, participants were less likely to die, or suffer a nonfatal stroke or have to be hospitalized again for heart failure compared to those who kept using the drug. "Due to the chance to recover cardiac function and symptoms at an early stage of the disease, early detection of heart problems in patients with methamphetamine abuse could prevent further deterioration," senior author Dr. Norman Mangner said in an American College of Cardiology news release. He's a physician at Heart Center ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Methamphetamine, Desoxyn, Ischemic Heart Disease, Desoxyn Gradumet

Sleepless Nights Could Pose Heart Risk Dangers

Posted 24 May 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 – Getting less than six hours of sleep a night may double the odds of dying from heart disease or stroke for people who already have risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, new research suggests. Known as metabolic syndrome, this cluster of risk factors can include high blood pressure, high levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, high blood sugar, obesity, high levels of blood fats known as triglycerides and low levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol. Someone with at least three of these conditions has metabolic syndrome. "It is possible that improving sleep in people with metabolic syndrome may lead to a better prognosis, which means not worsening into cardiovascular disease or stroke that could ultimately lead to early death," said study lead researcher Julio Fernandez-Mendoza. He is a sleep psychologist at the Sleep Research and Treatment Center at Penn State's ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Sleep Disorders, Fatigue, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

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