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Heart Disease News

Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

Is a Low-Salt Diet Always Healthy?

Posted 1 day 1 hour ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 – Steering clear of salty foods might not be as helpful for your heart health as previously thought, a new study claims. Participants in a long-range heart study did not appear to derive any health advantage from a low-salt diet, said lead researcher Lynn Moore. "People who were on a lower-sodium [salt] diet in general over the next 20 or 30 years actually had no benefit, specifically in terms of their blood pressure or their risk of developing heart disease," said Moore, an associate professor with the Boston University School of Medicine. On the other hand, these people did enjoy better health when they increased their intake of potassium, a mineral that helps the heart in a couple of ways, Moore and her colleagues found. "Higher intakes of potassium were strongly associated with both a lower blood pressure and a lower risk of heart disease," Moore said. "The ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Sodium Chloride, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, HalfLytely and Bisacodyl, Ischemic Heart Disease, Rhinaris, Hyper-Sal, Dextrose/Sodium Chloride, Ayr Saline Nasal, ENTsol, Potassium Chloride/Sodium Chloride, Saline Nasal Mist, Thermotabs, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Saljet Sterile, NebuSal, Rhino-Mist

Exercise Benefits Aging Hearts, Even Those of the Obese

Posted 1 day 23 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 – Exercise can reduce the risk of heart damage in middle-aged adults and seniors – even in those who are obese, according to a new study. "The protective association of physical activity against [heart] damage may have implications for heart failure risk reduction, particularly among the high-risk group of individuals with excess weight," study lead author Dr. Roberta Florido said in an American College of Cardiology news release. Florido is a cardiology fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. "Promoting physical activity," she added, "may be a particularly important strategy for heart failure risk reductions among high risk groups such as those with obesity." To gauge the influence of physical activity on heart health, the researchers looked at the experience of more than 9,400 people between 45 and 64 years of age. The participants ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Heart Disease

Want a Longer Life? Try Biking to Work

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – Adding a few miles of biking each day to your commute might add years to your life span, new research suggests. The British study found that bicycling to work appeared to halve people's odds for serious disease and premature death. Researchers from the University of Glasgow in Scotland looked at the commuting habits of more than 264,000 people in the United Kingdom and tracked their health over five years. Cycling to work was associated with a 46 percent lower risk of heart disease over five years and a 45 percent lower risk of cancer compared to a sedentary commute. Risk of premature death was 41 percent lower. Walking to work was also beneficial, but not to the same degree. Hoofing it was associated with a 27 percent lower risk of heart disease and a 36 percent lower risk of dying from heart disease. However, it wasn't linked with a lower risk of cancer or ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Do Marathons' Road Closures Lead to More Local Deaths?

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 – When a marathon shuts down city streets, it's more than an inconvenience: Nearby residents appear more likely to die from heart attack and cardiac arrest, a new study finds. The study, of 11 U.S. cities, found that older residents were less likely to survive the heart events on marathon days, compared to other days, perhaps due to delays in receiving care. Older people who landed in the hospital on a race day were over 13 percent more likely to die within a month, the findings showed. There was a similar difference when researchers compared those patients with older adults admitted the same day to hospitals outside the marathon-affected areas. The study drew praise but also notes of caution. "This is a great study," said Dr. Howard Mell, a spokesman for the American College of Emergency Physicians. When a city hosts a major sports event, he said, organizers ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

Exercisers May Have Better Shot of Surviving Heart Attack

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 – Maybe this will be the news that finally jolts you off the couch and into an exercise program. A new study suggests that being physically active increases the chances of survival after a heart attack. Researchers compared exercise levels among 1,664 heart attack patients in Denmark, including 425 who died immediately. Those who had been physically active were less likely to die, and the risk of death decreased as exercise levels rose. Patients who had light or moderate/high physical activity levels were 32 percent and 47 percent less likely to die from their heart attack, respectively, than the sedentary patients. The study was published April 12 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. "We know that exercise protects people against having a heart attack," said study co-author Eva Prescott, a professor of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Atherosclerosis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome

A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Healthy aging of the brain relies on the health of your heart and blood vessels when you're younger, a new study reports. People with risk factors for heart disease and stroke in middle age are more likely to have elevated levels of amyloid, a sticky protein known to clump together and form plaques in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said. MRI scans revealed larger deposits of amyloid in the brains of seniors who smoked, had high blood pressure, were obese, diabetic or had elevated cholesterol levels when they were middle-aged, said lead researcher Dr. Rebecca Gottesman. She's an assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. All of these risk factors can affect the health of a person's blood vessels, otherwise known as vascular health, leading to hardening of the arteries and ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Hypertriglyceridemia, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diabetes Mellitus, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Head Imaging

Health Tip: Should You Be Tested for Kidney Disease?

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Chronic kidney disease may not have obvious symptoms, so it's important to know if you're at risk. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says risk factors include: Having diabetes. Having high blood pressure. Having heart disease. Having someone in your family with chronic kidney disease. Being black, Hispanic/Latino or American Indian. Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Renal Failure, Pre-Diabetes, Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Many Americans Don't Know How to Handle High Cholesterol

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 – Americans with high cholesterol are well aware of its heart dangers, but many lack the confidence or knowledge to keep it under control, a new survey shows. High cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, causing about 2.6 million deaths in the United States each year, the researchers said. The survey included nearly 800 people nationwide with either a history of heart disease or at least one major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure or diabetes. Overall, 47 percent of the respondents had not had their cholesterol checked in the past year. While those with high cholesterol had higher rates of recent testing, 21 percent of them had not had their cholesterol checked in the past year. Eighty-two percent of the respondents knew there was a link between cholesterol and risk for heart disease and ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Angina, Transient Ischemic Attack, Hypertriglyceridemia, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease

The Grayer His Hair, the Higher His Heart Risk?

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 – Beyond signaling the march of time, gray hair may also point to a higher risk of heart disease for men, new research suggests. But don't panic if you sport silvery locks – the study only showed an association, not a cause-and-effect link, between hair color and heart risks. The finding stems from an analysis that looked at 545 adult men for signs of heart trouble, and then cross-referenced the results with hair color. "In our population, a high hair-whitening score was associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease," said study author Irini Samuel. She is a cardiologist at Cairo University, in Egypt. Atherosclerosis refers to the build-up of plaque in the arteries. Samuel said the finding held up regardless of a man's age or whether or not he was already known to face a high risk for developing heart disease. The frequency with ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Androgenetic Alopecia, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Don't Bank on Heart-Rate Accuracy From Your Activity Tracker

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 – Wrist-worn activity trackers such as Fitbit don't reliably assess heart rate, a new study finds. While the devices may have some legitimate benefits, they shouldn't be used for medical purposes, researchers suggest. Evaluating four wearable activity trackers from Fitbit, Basis and Mio, the investigators compared results to those from an electrocardiograph (EKG). The researchers found results varied among the different models, and were much less accurate during exercise than at rest. "These devices are probably good enough to inform consumers of general trends in their heart rate – high or low – [but] it's important to have more accurate information when physicians are relying on this data to make decisions on medications or other tests and treatments," said Dr. Mitesh Patel. Patel is an assistant professor of medicine and health care management at the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Tachyarrhythmia, Bradyarrhythmia, Diagnosis and Investigation

Taller, Bigger Women May Face Irregular Heartbeat Risk

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 – Big or tall women are nearly three times as likely to develop the dangerous irregular heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation as smaller women, a preliminary study says. The larger a woman's body size as a young adult, the more likely she is to develop the heart disorder later in life, according to the researchers. "There was a stepwise elevation in risk with increasing body size," said study author Dr. Annika Rosengren. "The group with the highest body surface area had nearly three times the risk as those with the lowest body surface area," added Rosengren, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that develops in the atria – the two upper chambers of the heart. The quivering heartbeat increases risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart rhythm problems, according to the ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

10 Minutes of Sweat a Day Helps Kids' Hearts

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, April 8, 2017 – Just a bit of vigorous exercise each day could help some children and teens reduce their risk of developing heart problems and diabetes, researchers say. The new study looked at nearly 11,600 kids, aged 4 to 18, in the United States, Brazil and Europe. The investigators found that replacing light exercise with as little as 10 minutes a day of intense activity may provide significant cardiometabolic benefits for young people who have relatively large waists and elevated levels of insulin in their blood. These are factors that put them at risk for developing heart problems and metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. "The results suggest that substituting modest amounts of vigorous physical activity for longer-duration light exercise may have cardiometabolic benefits above and beyond those conveyed by moderate activity and the avoidance of sedentary ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Multivitamins May Not Help Men's Hearts, Even When Diet Is Poor

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 7, 2017 – Millions of American men pop a multivitamin each day, but new research shows the pills won't help the heart – even if a man's nutrition is lacking. "Many had thought that men with 'poor' nutritional status at baseline may benefit more from long-term multivitamin use on cardiovascular outcomes; however, we did not see any evidence for this in our recent analysis," study author Howard Sesso, of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, said in a hospital news release. According to background information from the researchers, more than half of older Americans take a multivitamin each day. However, many prior studies have shown little evidence of any health benefit. In the new research, Sesso and his colleagues tracked data from an ongoing study of more than 14,000 U.S. male doctors over the age of 50. A prior look at this data had found that taking multivitamins did ... Read more

Related support groups: Vitamins, Heart Disease, Multivitamin, Vitamin D, Niacin, Folic Acid, Multivitamin With Minerals, Deplin, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Niaspan, Metanx, Vitamin B12, Vitamin C, Vitamin D3, Multivitamin With Iron, Centrum Multivitamins, Multivitamin, Prenatal, D3, A-25, Vitamin E

Who Really Needs All Those Heart Tests?

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 7, 2017 – Sometimes the treatment for heart problems may be more aggressive than it needs to be, according to Consumer Reports. Heart disease requires emergency medical attention when someone is having active symptoms, such as chest pain and shortness of breath. But excessive heart screening tests associated with false alarms can cause unnecessary anxiety and lead to a series of costly and risky procedures, the new report stated. Overtreatment for heart disease can lead to complications and worse outcomes, cautioned Dr. Marvin Lipman, the chief medical adviser at Consumer Reports. Low-risk patients with no worrisome symptoms who've been told they should undergo certain heart-screening tests should speak up and ask their doctor why these tests are necessary, he advised. "If you don't get a satisfactory answer, politely decline it or ask for a second opinion," Lipman said ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Diagnosis and Investigation, Ischemic Heart Disease, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

'Yo-Yo' Dieting Does No Favors for Your Heart

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – Yo-yo dieting – quickly losing weight only to promptly regain it – may raise the risk of heart problems, a new study suggests. People who experience regular weight fluctuations of 8 to 10 pounds are much more likely to suffer from heart disease, heart attack, stroke and other heart-related maladies than people who only experienced shifts of 2 pounds or less, said lead researcher Dr. Sripal Bangalore. He is an interventional cardiologist with NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City. In particular, yo-yo dieters had more than twice the risk of death, heart attack or stroke compared with people who maintained a relatively stable body weight, Bangalore said. "For every 1.5- to 2-pound change in weight fluctuation, the risk of any coronary or cardiovascular event was increased by 4 percent, and the risk of death by 9 percent," Bangalore said. Patients with ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

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Arrhythmia, Cardiomyopathy, Ischemic Heart Disease, Endocarditis, Heart Murmur, Pericarditis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Hemopericardium, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

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