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Gastroenteritis News

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Health Tip: Avoid Recipes With Raw Egg

Posted 2 days 9 hours ago by Drugs.com

-- You may have a recipe or two that calls for raw egg, such as for Caesar salad dressing, custard or mousse. But since raw egg increases your chances of food poisoning, it's best to use a safer substitute. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration suggests: Use pasteurized eggs, either in fresh, liquid, frozen or powdered form. Combine the eggs with the liquid recommended in the recipe, and heat to 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Use a food thermometer to verify the temperature. Instead of making these foods yourself, buy store-bought versions. They should contain pasteurized egg. Read product labels to make sure. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Learn About Pasteurization

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Pasteurization is the process of heating milk and other dairy products to kill harmful bacteria. The foodsafety.gov website offers these facts about pasteurization: It's necessary because there could be dangerous germs in raw milk. Pasteurization does not affect allergies to dairy products. Pasteurized milk is no less nutritious than raw milk. Even if pasteurized, milk should never be left unrefrigerated for an extended period. Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Gastroenteritis

Keep Your Summer Cookouts Safe

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, July 9, 2017 – Backyard barbecues are a seasonal staple, but summer heat makes it extra important to keep food safety in mind. Bacteria grow faster at temperatures between 40 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, increasing your risk for foodborne illnesses, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Fortunately, there are a lot of steps consumers can take to keep family and friends from becoming ill," the FDA's Marjorie Davidson said in an agency news release. Davidson is education team leader in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. For starters, make sure your hands are clean. Before you cook or eat, wash with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If there's no sink available, use a water jug, soap and some paper towels. Or clean your hands with moist, disposable towelettes, the FDA advised. These steps will also help prevent foodborne illness: Don't ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Swimming Lessons: For Starters, Watch Out for Germs in the Water

Posted 5 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 – A dip in a pool, stream or lake on a hot summer day is refreshing, but take some precautions to avoid bacteria and parasites that might lurk in the water. "One of the worst offenders is the kiddie wading pool," said Dr. Christopher Ohl, a professor of infectious diseases at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. "Warm, shallow water and kids in swim diapers – which don't do a good job of containing feces – can create a perfect breeding ground for water-borne infections even though the water is chlorinated," he said. "The best way to prevent young children from getting sick is to keep them from swallowing that water." Ohl offered some other tips: For starters, keep children who have had any type of gastrointestinal illness away from pools or water parks for several days to prevent contamination of the water. Don't swallow the water when ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Lidocaine, Maintain, Lidoderm, Gastroenteritis, Orajel, Xylocaine, Benzocaine, Aloe Vera, Anbesol, Emla, Xylocaine Jelly, Vagisil, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Bactine, Allergen, Lanacane, Zilactin Toothache, Antipyrine/Benzocaine, Solarcaine

Health Tip: Packing for a Picnic

Posted 4 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Picnicking is lots of fun, but nothing can ruin your outdoor meal faster than a nasty case of food poisoning. The Foodsafety.gov website explains how to reduce your risk: Pack any meat, seafood, poultry, sandwiches, summer salads, fruit, veggies and dairy products in a cold cooler. Fill the cooler with ice to help it stay colder longer. Store it in a shady spot. Avoid opening the cooler to help food stay longer. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Think Safety First When Dining Outdoors

Posted 30 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 30, 2017 – When you're hosting picnics in the park or patio barbecues, you might be totally focused on creating the menu and doing your grocery shopping. But how you prepare, transport and serve those special dishes is just as important to avoid foodborne illnesses, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Whether eating on your patio or packing food to go, remember to keep raw meat, chicken and seafood separate from other foods to avoid cross-contamination. Marinate food in the fridge, not on your counter. Avoid drips on the way to the grill and throw out any liquid left in the bowl you used. Wash platters and utensils used on raw meat before using them for cooked foods. Get in the habit of using a food thermometer when grilling to test for doneness, and then keep hot foods hot by moving them to the sides of the grill rack. Keep cold foods well chilled. At ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

How to Dodge Summertime Threats

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – During the summer, poison centers get an increase in the number of calls about bites, stings, plants and pesticides. The Nebraska Regional Poison Center offers these tips on how to avoid poisonings – and other hazards – this summer. "If you are stung, call the poison center. Close observation for allergic reaction is important, especially in the first hour after a sting," the center said in a news release. Use only insect repellents that are meant to be used on skin. Products containing DEET should be applied sparingly to exposed skin and clothing – and repellents with less than 10 percent DEET are as effective as stronger ones. Wash thoroughly once you go indoors. A seasonal threat to kids is exposure to gasoline, kerosene, lighter fluids and torch fuels. These products are among the top 10 causes of childhood poisoning deaths in the United States, according ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Gastroenteritis, Poisoning, Hangover, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Insect Bites, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Cooking Out? Don't Forget Your Food Thermometer

Posted 18 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 17, 2017 – Keep food safety at the top of your mind when you cook out this summer. A key is using a food thermometer when you prepare meat or poultry, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). "The best and only way to make sure bacteria have been killed and food is safe to eat is by cooking it to the correct internal temperature as measured by a food thermometer," FSIS Administrator Al Almanza said in an agency news release. "It is a simple step that can stop your family and guests from getting foodborne illness," he added. Every year, about 48 million people in the United States get food-borne illnesses, resulting in 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But many folks fail to take precautions. For example, only 34 percent of Americans use a food ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Enteric Fever, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis

'Good' Donor Bacteria Can Last Long Term in Stool Transplant Patients

Posted 16 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – Researchers say their small study offers the first proof that therapeutic donor microbes remain for months or years in patients who've undergone stool transplants. Medically known as "fecal microbiota transplantation" (FMT), the procedure is used to treat severe diarrhea and colitis caused by repeated Clostridium difficile infections, the researchers explained. FMT is an increasingly popular treatment for C. difficile infections, with a 90 percent success rate. It involves collecting stool from a healthy donor and mixing it with salt water. The solution is then transferred to the patient's digestive tract through a thin, flexible tube called a colonoscope, or through the nose. C. difficile gut infections can be deadly. They often follow use of antibiotics that change the normal balance of bacteria in a patient's gut. C. difficile is increasingly resistant to ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Clostridial Infection, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

High-Intensity Exercise May Be Bad for the Bowels

Posted 16 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 – When it comes to stomach discomfort during exercise, forget that old adage "no pain, no gain." New research suggests that excessive strenuous exercise may lead to gut damage. "The stress response of prolonged vigorous exercise shuts down gut function," said lead author Ricardo Costa. "The redistribution of blood flow away from the gut and towards working muscles creates gut cell injury that may lead to cell death, leaky gut, and systemic immune responses due to intestinal bacteria entering general circulation," Costa added. He's a senior researcher with the department of nutrition, dietetics and food at Monash University in Australia. Researchers observed that the risk of gut injury and impaired function seems to increase along with the intensity and duration of exercise. The problem is dubbed "exercise-induced gastrointestinal syndrome." The researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Advil, Diclofenac, Voltaren, Aleve, Dietary Supplementation, Mobic, Indigestion, Motrin, Indomethacin, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Toradol, Gastroenteritis, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac

Health Tip: Getting Over a Stomach Virus

Posted 10 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- After a gastrointestinal virus makes your stomach sensitive and you feel nauseated, avoid heavy foods that can worsen your symptoms. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests these easy-on-your-tummy foods: Bananas. Rice and plain potatoes. Plain applesauce. Plain dry toast. Saltine crackers. Clear broth. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Preparing Nutritious Meals

Posted 4 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Preparing a week's worth of meals on the weekends ensures that you have a steady supply of nutritious offerings. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends: Grocery shopping on Saturdays, and cooking food for the week on Sundays. Most food will stay safe three-to-four days in the refrigerator. Divide cooked food into portions, store in small containers and immediately refrigerate. Don't leave food on the counter to cool. Reheat only the portion for that night's meal, rather than the whole dish. You can't always see, smell or taste spoiled food. If you're not sure if it's safe to eat, throw it out. Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Weight Loss, Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

U.S. Health Officials Make Headway Against Salmonella

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 – A new government report that lists the top offenders for food poisoning shows that U.S. health officials have made progress against salmonella infections. In 2016, there was an 18 percent drop in illnesses caused by this common type of bacteria, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tougher regulations and more vaccinations of chickens most likely explain the decrease, the researchers said. "We are making progress in detecting and responding more quickly to foodborne illness, but our priority remains preventing illnesses from happening in the first place," said Susan Mayne. She directs the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. "The final rules we are implementing under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act focus on prevention, and we will continue to work closely with ... Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Eating Lunch at Work

Posted 13 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Eating at the job? Make sure you don't ignore food-safety rules. Here are suggestions from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Wash your hands with soap and water, or use a hand sanitizer, before and after you eat. Don't allow your lunch or leftovers to be unrefrigerated for more than two hours. If you're eating leftovers, reheat to 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Store perishable foods in the refrigerator, set to below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. If you re-use the same lunch bag, wash it frequently. Don't let frozen foods thaw on the countertop. Defrost them in the microwave or refrigerator. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

Health Tip: Freezing Food

Posted 7 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Freezing food helps avoid the growth of germs, allowing perishables to last longer than if they were refrigerated. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics offers these suggestions for freezing food safely: Make sure your freezer is set to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. Confirm the temperature with an appliance thermometer. While you can freeze just about anything except canned foods or eggs in shells, some foods (such as lettuce, cream sauces or mayonnaise) may not maintain quality. Store food in freezer-safe bags, heavy plastic containers or heavyweight aluminum foil. Date and label foods before storing in the freezer. Use older foods before newer ones to help thwart freezer burn. Read more

Related support groups: Gastroenteritis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Traveler's Diarrhea, Salmonella Gastroenteritis

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