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Eye Conditions News

Related terms: Eye Disorders

Health Tip: Applying Eye Drops

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Applying eye drops without the excess trickling down your face can be tricky. The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology suggests: Wash your hands, then take the bottle of eye drops and slowly rotate it for 30 seconds. Lean your head back and gently pull down the lower eyelid. Use your index finger to pull down the lid, or use your thumb and index finger to gently pinch the lower lid. Taking care to avoid the dropper touching your eye, let one drop fall into the pocket formed in your lower eyelid. If you are supposed to use more than one drop, wait three to four minutes before applying the second one. Close your eyes for a minute, then put gentle pressure over the spot where your eyelid joins with your nose. Replace the cap on the bottle. Use a tissue to wipe away any extra medicine, and wash your hands again. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Glaucoma, Eye Dryness/Redness, Cataract, Glaucoma (Open Angle), Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Dry Eye Disease, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis, Inclusion Conjunctivitis, Glaucoma (Narrow Angle), Glaucoma with Pupillary Block, Ocular Fungal Infection, Neonatal Conjunctivitis

Untreated Vision Problems Plague U.S. Preschoolers

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 5, 2017 – Close to 175,000 American preschoolers struggle with common, but untreated, vision problems, a new report warns. And that figure is expected to rise significantly in the coming years. The analysis projects that the number of cases of uncorrected poor vision in this very young population will jump 26 percent by 2060. "The [current] high proportion of visual impairment that can be easily prevented or treated is astonishing," said study author Dr. Rohit Varma. He is director of the USC Roski Eye Institute at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. And "it means that there is an urgent need to increase vision screening and the awareness of the importance of preschool vision exam," Varma added. The investigators relied on data from two national studies that looked at vision problems in American kids. The researchers noted that the vast majority of untreated ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Dry Eye Disease, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Is Annual Eye Exam a Must for People With Type 1 Diabetes?

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 – People with type 1 diabetes face the risk of developing a disease that can cause blindness, so treatment guidelines have long called for annual eye exams. But new research suggests this one-size-fits-all advice is costly and ineffective, because people with a low risk may need less-frequent screenings while people at high risk may need to be seen more often. Diabetic retinopathy can damage the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye and trigger full vision loss, the researchers explained. Screening can catch this disease before irreparable damage is done, but not every person with diabetes faces the same risk. "For example, patients with no or minimal eye changes and good blood sugar levels might not need their next examination for another four years," said study author Dr. David Nathan. "On the other hand, if the patient already has developing eye ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Diabetes, Type 1, Dry Eye Disease, Retinal Disorders, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Diabetic Macular Edema, Diabetic Coma (in DM Type I)

Peripheral Vision Varies From Person to Person

Posted 13 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 – Do you feel like you can't ever catch a ball that comes in from your left side? A bad spot in your peripheral vision may be to blame. Peripheral vision is the ability to see things that aren't in the center of your field of vision. A new small study found significant differences in people's ability to detect objects in their peripheral vision. For example, some people were better at spotting things on the left, while others excelled at seeing things on the right. "Everyone has their own pattern of sensitivity, with islands of poor vision and other regions of good vision," said study lead author John Greenwood, from University College London in England. Greenwood and his team gave 12 people a series of perception tests over several years. Overall, the participants were worse at spotting objects in crowded environments when they were above or below eye level, ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Diagnosis and Investigation, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Brain 'Rewires' to Work Around Early-Life Blindness

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – Blindness at an early age triggers the brain to make new connections that enhance hearing, smell and touch, as well as memory and language, a new study suggests. Researchers used MRIs to scan the brains of 12 people who were born blind or lost their sight by age 3. The scans showed a number of changes in the brains of the people who were blind that weren't present in scans from people who could still see. Changes caused by early blindness "may be more widespread than initially thought," lead author Corinna Bauer, a scientist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, said in a hospital news release. "We observed significant changes not only in the occipital cortex [where vision is processed], but also areas implicated in memory, language processing and sensory motor functions," added Bauer. Learning more about these connections could lead to more effective rehabilitation ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Retinal Disorders, Diagnosis and Investigation, Visual Defect/Disturbance

For Seniors, Treatment for One Eye Disease May Cause Another

Posted 16 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 – Drugs that preserve vision in people with the eye disease called age-related macular degeneration might increase the risk of another eye condition – glaucoma, a new study suggests. People who received at least seven eye injections of the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) each year to treat macular degeneration have a higher risk of eventually needing surgery to treat glaucoma, the Canadian study found. But, the researchers aren't suggesting that people forgo these treatments for macular degeneration. These drugs help stave off a previously untreatable cause of blindness in the elderly, and should continue to be used, the researchers said. And, if glaucoma does develop, treatments are available. "Even though there may be a risk here, this doesn't mean you should not be getting injections for macular degeneration," said study lead author Dr. Brennan Eadie. He's an ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Glaucoma, Glaucoma (Open Angle), Votrient, Macular Degeneration, Avastin, Sutent, Nexavar, Pazopanib, Stivarga, Sunitinib, Retinal Disorders, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Cyramza, Sorafenib, Bevacizumab, Vandetanib, Cabometyx, Lenvima, Retinopathy

Stem Cells Hold Promise, Peril in Treating Seniors' Eye Disease

Posted 15 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 – Stem cells may offer new hope for people losing their vision to age-related macular degeneration, but that promise can come with some peril, new research shows. In one report, three older women were permanently blinded at a Florida eye clinic that performed unproven stem cell treatments on their eyes in 2015, said senior study author Dr. Jeffrey Goldberg. He's chair of ophthalmology for the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. The women all thought the stem cell therapy was part of a clinical trial, but there's no evidence that a genuine clinical trial was taking place, Goldberg noted. "It appears the patients were lured in with the promise of a research protocol and it's not clear that they were actually signed up for any research," Goldberg said. "They were just injected with these cells of some sort." The women, aged 72 to 88, ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Macular Degeneration, Macular Edema, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Health Tip: Don't Contaminate Contact Lenses

Posted 15 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Germs on poorly handled contact lenses can lead to serious eye infections. To avoid this problem, the American Optometric Association suggests: Don't wash your hands with a creamy soap, which can leave a film on lenses. Never create a homemade saline solution, which can damage lenses. Don't put lenses in your mouth to moisten them. Don't store or wash lenses in tap water. Don't let anyone else wear your lenses. Don't wear contact lenses to sleep if you've been in a hot tub, pool, lake or ocean. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Orbital Infection, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Ocular Fungal Infection

Zika Virus May Also Harm the Heart

Posted 9 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 – Zika may cause heart problems in some people infected with the mosquito-borne virus, researchers report. A new study has identified nine Venezuelan patients who suffered from heart problems shortly after coming down with Zika virus symptoms. Eight of the nine patients developed dangerous heart rhythm disorders, and two-thirds had evidence of heart failure, a condition in which the heart isn't pumping enough blood to meet the body's needs. Lead researcher Dr. Karina Gonzalez Carta said doctors should consider electrocardiograms (ECG) for all Zika-infected patients, and follow-up testing if an irregular heartbeat is detected. "While we anticipated we would see cardiovascular effects from Zika, we were surprised at the severity of the findings," said Carta, a Venezuelan native, and a cardiologist and research fellow at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. This is ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Heart Disease, Conjunctivitis, Hydrocephalus, Brain Anomalies incl Congenital, Zika Virus Infection

Eye Exam Might Help Spot Poor Circulation in Legs

Posted 9 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 – Could a routine eye exam some day point to trouble with circulation in the legs? New research suggests it might be possible. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore said changes in the eye's retina may help spot people at risk for a narrowing of the large blood vessels in the legs – a condition called peripheral artery disease (PAD). "PAD is estimated to affect approximately 8.5 million Americans above the age of 40 years and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and quality of life impairment," noted one heart specialist, Dr. Samy Selim. He's an interventional cardiologist at Northwell Health's Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. And while the disability from PAD is serious and widespread, "physician screening for PAD is not satisfactory, to say the least," Selim said. The new study was led by Hopkins researcher Chao Yang and is ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Pre-Diabetes, Raynaud's Syndrome, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Pyoderma Gangrenosum, Intermittent Claudication, Eye Redness/Itching, Retinal Disorders, Retinitis Pigmentosa, Chorioretinitis, Retinal Hemorrhage, Arterial Thrombosis, Peripheral Arteriography

Health Tip: Know Your Risk for Diabetic Retinopathy

Posted 6 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

-- A common form of diabetic eye disease is retinopathy. Caused by damaged blood vessels that feed the eye's retina, it can lead to serious vision problems, including vision loss. The American Diabetes Association says risk factors for diabetic retinopathy include: Uncontrolled blood sugar. High blood pressure. How long you have been living with diabetes. Your genetics. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Diabetic Retinopathy, Retinopathy, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Retinopathy Prophylaxis

Kids Should Be Screened for Lazy Eye by Age 5

Posted 28 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 – Young children should be screened at least once for lazy eye before they turn 5 years old, a U.S. panel of experts says. The U.S. Preventive Services Task (USPSTF) is still advising parents to have their kids screened at least once for lazy eye or its risk factors. Screening should be done when the children are between the ages of 3 and 5 years old. These draft guidelines are an update to 2011 recommendations. Early identification of lazy eye – technically called amblyopia – is critical. If the condition isn't treated by the time a child is between the ages of 6 and 10 years, vision can be permanently affected, the experts said. With lazy eye, the brain and one eye don't communicate properly. Symptoms may include a wandering eye, eyes that don't seem to work together, or poor depth perception, the experts explained. It's estimated that up to 6 percent of ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Scientists Shed Light on Possible Cause of Nearsightedness

Posted 22 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 – Whether you're nearsighted or not might come down to one particular type of cell in your retina, a new mouse study suggests. Researchers from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago report that this cell is highly sensitive to light and controls how the eye develops. If it malfunctions and tells the eye to grow for too long, images don't get focused in the retina as they should be, the researchers said. "The eye needs to stop growing at precisely the right time during childhood," said lead investigator Greg Schwartz, an assistant professor of ophthalmology. "But for years no one knew what cell carried the signal," he explained in a university news release. "We potentially found the key missing link, which is the cell that actually does that task and the neural circuit that enables this important visual function." The study was conducted ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Diagnosis and Investigation, Myopia, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization

FDA Approves Genentech’s Lucentis (ranibizumab) for Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization

Posted 10 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

South San Francisco, CA – January 5, 2017 – Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Lucentis® (ranibizumab injection) 0.5 mg for the treatment of patients with myopic choroidal neovascularization (mCNV), a complication of severe near-sightedness that can lead to blindness. Lucentis is the first FDA-approved anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy to treat mCNV in the U.S. This is the fifth FDA-approved indication for Lucentis since the medicine was launched in 2006. This approval is based on the results of the Phase III RADIANCE study, which demonstrated that treatment with Lucentis provided superior visual acuity gains in people with mCNV compared to verteporfin photodynamic therapy (vPDT). At three months, average visual acuity gains for patients treated with ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Lucentis, Ranibizumab, Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization

Laundry Detergent Pods Linked to Eye Burn Danger in Kids

Posted 2 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 – Liquid laundry detergent pods may be convenient, but young children are suffering vision-threatening burns from the chemicals inside them in increasing numbers, a new study finds. Between 2012 and 2015, more than 1,200 preschoolers in the United States suffered eye burns from these single-use detergent pods. In 2012, only 12 such burns were reported. By 2015, that number was almost 500. "These pods look like toys, they look like candy, and kids are finding them, playing with them, puncturing them, and the chemicals inside the pods are getting into their eyes," said lead researcher Dr. R. Sterling Haring, from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. Injuries most often occur when children play with the detergent pods and they break and the liquid squirts into their eyes. Burns also happen when kids get the soap on their hands ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Poisoning, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Visual Defect/Disturbance

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Related Condition Support Groups

Eye Dryness / Redness, Glaucoma, Dry Eye Disease, Macular Degeneration, Cataract, Conjunctivitis, Blepharitis, Pupillary Dilation, Eye Redness / Itching, view more... Iritis, Macular Edema, Ocular Rosacea, Myopia, Refraction - Assessment, Eyelash Hypotrichosis, Retinal Disorders, Visual Defect / Disturbance, Hordeolum, Stye, Ocular Herpes Simplex, Optic Nerve Disorder, Strabismus, Corneal Abrasion, Chorioditis, Neuromyelitis Optica, Inhibition of Intraoperative Miosis, Corneal Cystine Crystal Accumulation, Dacryocystitis, Meibomian Cyst, Episcleritis, Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization, Vitreomacular Adhesion, Color Vision Defect (Acquired), Retinopathy, Orbital Infection, Ocular Fungal Infection, Infectious Endophthalmitis

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