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Eye Conditions News

Related terms: Eye Disorders

Laser Therapy Shows Promise Against Eye 'Floaters'

Posted 2 days 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 20, 2017 – A laser treatment can reduce spots in people's vision known as "floaters," a new study finds. "Floaters often arise as the vitreous – a gel-like substance that fills the eye – contracts and pulls away from the back of the eye," explained ophthalmologist Dr. Naomi Goldberg, who reviewed the new research. She works at the Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in New York City. Floaters become more common with age, and although some people simply get used to them, others are bothered by them or their vision is impaired. The new research was led by Dr. Chirag Shah and Dr. Jeffrey Heier of Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston. They explained that, currently, there are three management options for floaters: patient education and observation; surgery; and a laser procedure known as YAG vitreolysis. However, Shah and Heier said there are few published studies on the ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Vitrectomy, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Vitreomacular Adhesion

Impaired Eyesight May Be First Sign of Zika Damage in Babies

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 – Infants exposed to the Zika virus in the womb should have their eyes examined for possible virus-related abnormalities, according to a new report. "All infants with potential Zika virus exposure should undergo screening eye examinations regardless of [central nervous system] abnormalities, timing of maternal infection during pregnancy, or laboratory confirmation," said Dr. Andrea Zin and colleagues. Zin is with the National Institute of Women's Health in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In some cases, evidence of Zika infection may only show up in the eyes, the study found. The results were published July 17 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. "Eye abnormalities may be the only initial finding in congenital Zika virus infection," Zin said in a journal news release. Zika, a mosquito-borne virus, usually causes only mild symptoms in healthy adults. But fetal exposure during ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Contraception, Eye Conditions, Delivery, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation, Hydrocephalus, Cesarean Section, Zika Virus Infection, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision Problems

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 – Changes in vision may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease, researchers report. The neurodegenerative condition is caused by the loss of neurons in several brain structures, resulting in tremors, rigidity or stiffness, along with impaired balance and coordination, the Italian researchers explained. But, "although Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disorder, several studies have shown non-motor symptoms are common across all stages of the disease," said lead researcher Dr. Alessandro Arrigo. He is a resident in ophthalmology at the University Vita-Salute San Raffaele of Milan. "However, these symptoms are often undiagnosed because patients are unaware of the link to the disease and, as a result, they may be undertreated," Arrigo added. Non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients include visual changes, such as an inability to perceive ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Parkinson's Disease, Dry Eye Disease, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Color Vision Defect (Acquired)

Soft Contact Lenses Safe for Kids and Teens, Review Finds

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 – Soft contact lenses are as safe for children and teens as they are for adults, a new review finds. "In the past decade, there has been increasing interest in fitting children with contact lenses," said review author Mark Bullimore, an adjunct professor at the University of Houston College of Optometry. He reviewed nine studies that included 7- to 19-year-olds who use soft contact lenses, to gauge the risk of corneal inflammation and infection. Called "corneal infiltrative events," these are usually mild, but about 5 percent involve a serious infection called microbial keratitis. Bullimore found a relatively low rate of these corneal infiltrative events among youths, with one large study finding the rate of events in younger children (8 to 12) much lower than in teens aged 13 to 17. The review also found that microbial keratitis was uncommon, with one study ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Keratitis, Corneal Ulcer, Myopia, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Why Chopping Onions Makes You Cry

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 – Ever wonder why your eyes fill with tears when you chop an onion? One eye doctor pinpoints the culprit. Onions use sulfur in the soil to create amino acid sulfoxides, which are sulfur compounds that readily turn into a gas. When an onion is cut open, it releases the sulfoxides and enzymes, which react and create a gas called syn-propanethial-S-oxide. Because onions grow underground, this gas helps deter critters that want to feed on them. But the gas is also what causes your eyes to water when chopping onions, said Dr. Robert Rosa Jr., an ophthalmologist at the Texas A&M College of Medicine. "It really is a complicated chemical process that creates the gas," said Rosa. "They all act as precursors that create the lachrymatory processor – or what makes you tear up." White, yellow and red onions all have higher concentrations of the onion enzyme necessary to ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching

Eye Docs Debunk 5 Fireworks Myths

Posted 2 Jul 2017 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, July 2, 2017 – Firecrackers, sparklers and bottle rockets may seem harmless enough, but there's really no such thing as safe fireworks for consumers, eye doctors warn. Each year, about 10,000 fireworks-related injuries are treated at U.S. emergency departments. Most of those cases involve children, including many who suffer eye injuries, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). Most of the injuries are caused by legal fireworks that parents buy for their children, such as sparklers, firecrackers and Roman candles, according to the AAO. The group debunks five top fireworks myths. Myth 1. Sparklers are safe for young children. False. Sparklers burn at 1,800 degrees – that's hot enough to melt some metals. Sparklers are responsible for most fireworks-related injuries among children age 5 and younger. Myth 2. It's safe to watch nearby fireworks if you don't light ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Burns - External, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare Diseases

Posted 26 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 – "Genome sequencing" of healthy people reveals that some are at risk for rare genetic diseases, a new study shows. And doctors need to be sensitive when revealing that information, the researchers said. "Sequencing healthy individuals will inevitably reveal new findings for that individual, only some of which will have actual health implications," said study lead author Dr. Jason Vassy. He's a clinician investigator at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Vassy and his colleagues said they found "reassuring evidence" that doctors can be trained to manage their patients' sequencing results appropriately. Moreover, "patients who receive their results are not likely to experience anxiety connected to those results," Vassy said in a hospital news release. Whole genome sequencing entails analysis of the 3 billion pairs of letters in someone's DNA. Scientists ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Diagnosis and Investigation, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Surf's Up! How to Plan for a Safe Beach Vacation

Posted 25 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 24, 2017 – Heading to the beach this summer? Make safety part of your vacation planning. Sun protection belongs at the top of your packing list. Must-haves include sunscreen, sunglasses, protective clothing and a hat, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. Here are some of the agency's other recommendations: Don't use tanning beds to pre-tan before a beach vacation. The lamps emit harmful ultraviolet rays that can damage your skin. Also, be aware that spray tans and bronzers do not protect against UV rays. Make a list of medications you need to take, and get enough to last the trip. Keep your medicines with you when traveling. Also, carry a detailed list of what medicines you take and have your health care provider's contact information in case you need medical care while you're away. If you wear contact lenses, pack enough for the entire vacation. Don't forget to ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Hepatitis C, HIV Infection, Sunburn, Sunscreen, Prevention of Sunburn, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Coppertone, Deeptan

Choosing the Right Sunglasses

Posted 23 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 – You might think of eye problems like cataracts as signs of old age, but one step you can take now will protect your vision for the future – and you can do it with style. We're talking about sunglasses. Your eyes need to be protected from the dangers of UV light the same way your skin does. And just like your skin, it's protection you need every day, not just when you're at the beach. Eye doctors recommend wearing your shades anytime you're outside, although they are extra important in summer and in winter on snowy terrain and at high altitudes. They're also a must any time you're on medication that increases sun sensitivity. Style aside, the most effective are large wraparound sunglasses that absorb 100 percent of UV rays, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. For durability and the best visibility, look for scratch-resistant polycarbonate ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Cataract, Sunburn, Sunscreen, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Deeptan, Coppertone

Sharp Eyes Can Make Soccer Players Sharp Shooters

Posted 9 Jun 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 – Ever wonder why elite soccer players can seemingly thread the eye of a needle with their passes and shots? According to a new study, competitive players have much better vision than people who aren't athletes. Researchers at Liverpool John Moores University in England assessed 49 soccer players from a professional English Premier League, 31 university soccer players, and 230 healthy non-athletes. The volunteers were tested for visual clarity (sharpness of focus), contrast sensitivity (ability to distinguish objects from their background), and near-far quickness (speed of switching focus from near to far objects). Average scores were better for both groups of soccer players than for the non-athletes. There were no differences between the professional and university players, the researchers said. However, defensive players had faster near-far quickness than ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Eye Problems May Be Tied to Zika, Lab Study Suggests

Posted 25 May 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 – Scientists exploring how the Zika virus passes from pregnant monkeys to their fetuses believe the infection may be more dangerous to human pregnancies than previously believed. "The results we're seeing in monkey pregnancies make us think that, as they grow, more human babies might develop Zika-related disease pathology than is currently appreciated," said lead researcher Ted Golos. Golos is professor of comparative biosciences and obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The researchers came to their conclusions after infecting four pregnant macaque monkeys with levels of the virus roughly equivalent to what they'd get from a mosquito bite. Some monkeys were infected in the first trimester and others in the third trimester of the pregnancies. The scientists found that the virus made its way to each monkey's fetus. "That is a very high ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Viral Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Zika Virus Infection, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Health Tip: Applying Eye Drops

Posted 9 May 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Applying eye drops without the excess trickling down your face can be tricky. The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology suggests: Wash your hands, then take the bottle of eye drops and slowly rotate it for 30 seconds. Lean your head back and gently pull down the lower eyelid. Use your index finger to pull down the lid, or use your thumb and index finger to gently pinch the lower lid. Taking care to avoid the dropper touching your eye, let one drop fall into the pocket formed in your lower eyelid. If you are supposed to use more than one drop, wait three to four minutes before applying the second one. Close your eyes for a minute, then put gentle pressure over the spot where your eyelid joins with your nose. Replace the cap on the bottle. Use a tissue to wipe away any extra medicine, and wash your hands again. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Glaucoma, Eye Dryness/Redness, Cataract, Glaucoma (Open Angle), Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Dry Eye Disease, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis, Glaucoma (Narrow Angle), Inclusion Conjunctivitis, Glaucoma with Pupillary Block, Ocular Fungal Infection, Neonatal Conjunctivitis

Untreated Vision Problems Plague U.S. Preschoolers

Posted 5 May 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 5, 2017 – Close to 175,000 American preschoolers struggle with common, but untreated, vision problems, a new report warns. And that figure is expected to rise significantly in the coming years. The analysis projects that the number of cases of uncorrected poor vision in this very young population will jump 26 percent by 2060. "The [current] high proportion of visual impairment that can be easily prevented or treated is astonishing," said study author Dr. Rohit Varma. He is director of the USC Roski Eye Institute at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. And "it means that there is an urgent need to increase vision screening and the awareness of the importance of preschool vision exam," Varma added. The investigators relied on data from two national studies that looked at vision problems in American kids. The researchers noted that the vast majority of untreated ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Dry Eye Disease, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Is Annual Eye Exam a Must for People With Type 1 Diabetes?

Posted 20 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 – People with type 1 diabetes face the risk of developing a disease that can cause blindness, so treatment guidelines have long called for annual eye exams. But new research suggests this one-size-fits-all advice is costly and ineffective, because people with a low risk may need less-frequent screenings while people at high risk may need to be seen more often. Diabetic retinopathy can damage the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye and trigger full vision loss, the researchers explained. Screening can catch this disease before irreparable damage is done, but not every person with diabetes faces the same risk. "For example, patients with no or minimal eye changes and good blood sugar levels might not need their next examination for another four years," said study author Dr. David Nathan. "On the other hand, if the patient already has developing eye ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Diabetes, Type 1, Dry Eye Disease, Retinal Disorders, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Diabetic Macular Edema, Diabetic Coma (in DM Type I)

Peripheral Vision Varies From Person to Person

Posted 13 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 – Do you feel like you can't ever catch a ball that comes in from your left side? A bad spot in your peripheral vision may be to blame. Peripheral vision is the ability to see things that aren't in the center of your field of vision. A new small study found significant differences in people's ability to detect objects in their peripheral vision. For example, some people were better at spotting things on the left, while others excelled at seeing things on the right. "Everyone has their own pattern of sensitivity, with islands of poor vision and other regions of good vision," said study lead author John Greenwood, from University College London in England. Greenwood and his team gave 12 people a series of perception tests over several years. Overall, the participants were worse at spotting objects in crowded environments when they were above or below eye level, ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Diagnosis and Investigation, Visual Defect/Disturbance

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Eye Dryness / Redness, Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration, Dry Eye Disease, Cataract, Conjunctivitis, Eye Redness / Itching, Blepharitis, Pupillary Dilation, view more... Iritis, Ocular Rosacea, Myopia, Macular Edema, Retinal Disorders, Visual Defect / Disturbance, Eyelash Hypotrichosis, Ocular Herpes Simplex, Optic Nerve Disorder, Strabismus, Hordeolum, Stye, Corneal Abrasion, Refraction - Assessment, Neuromyelitis Optica, Dacryocystitis, Meibomian Cyst, Episcleritis, Vitreomacular Adhesion, Inhibition of Intraoperative Miosis, Color Vision Defect (Acquired), Retinopathy, Orbital Infection, Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization, Chorioditis, Corneal Cystine Crystal Accumulation, Ocular Fungal Infection, Infectious Endophthalmitis

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