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Colonoscopy News

Even a Little Daily Activity May Boost Colon Cancer Survival: Study

Posted 19 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Just a half hour a day of moderate physical activity could be potent medicine for patients with advanced colon cancer, preliminary research suggests. Study authors who tracked more than 1,200 colon cancer patients found a 19 percent decline in risk for early death among those who got 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise daily. And, five or more hours of moderate – but non-vigorous – activity a week pushed that survival benefit to 25 percent, researchers said. Walking, cleaning or gardening counted as moderate exercise, the study authors said. Exercise benefits previously have been reported for early stage cancer patients. "But this study extends to patients who have advanced cancer and a much more grim prognosis," said Dr. Andrew Chan. He's an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. "And even among that population, there seems ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Study Questions 'Fecal Transplant' Treatment for Gut Infection

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – A single fecal transplant delivered by enema is apparently no more effective than oral antibiotics in treating recurring cases of a nasty stomach bug, a Canadian study contends. The study is the first head-to-head comparison between fecal transplant and the current standard of care of antibiotics in treating Clostridium difficile infection, the researchers said. "We thought it was important to have that comparison so we could know: How much better is it than what we're actually already doing?" said lead author Dr. Susy Hota. She's the medical director of infection prevention and control at University Health Network in Toronto. In this study, "it looks like they're working about the same," Hota said. "In half the patients, it didn't work, but in the other half, it did." Infection from C. difficile bacteria can be debilitating, triggering bouts of diarrhea and ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Clostridial Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

Health Tip: Concerned About Constipation?

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Constipation occurs when bowel movements happen infrequently or are difficult to pass. Sometimes, lifestyle changes can curb constipation, but other times the condition signals something more serious. The Cleveland Clinic says to see a doctor if: It isn't "normal" for you to be constipated. You notice any blood in your stools. You lose weight without trying. It becomes very painful to pass a bowel movement. You are constipated for an extended period. Read more

Related support groups: Constipation, Colonoscopy, Constipation - Chronic, Colorectal Cancer, Constipation - Acute

Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk: Study

Posted 22 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 – Taking vitamin E and selenium does not appear to reduce the risk of polyps that can lead to colon cancer, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from more than 6,500 men in the United States and Canada and found that those who took the two antioxidants did not have a lower risk of colon polyps than those who took placebos. "The message to the public is this: Vitamin E and selenium will not prevent colorectal adenomas, which are surrogates for colorectal cancer," lead author Dr. Peter Lance said in a news release from SWOG, the cancer clinical trials network funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute. Lance is deputy director of the University of Arizona Cancer Center. He and his SWOG team used data from SELECT, a prostate cancer prevention trial that enrolled more than 35,000 healthy men – 21 percent were men of color – from 427 study sites in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Vitamin E, Selenium, Aquasol E, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Alpha E, E-400 Clear, PTE-5, NeoQ10, MTE-5 Concentrated, Amino-Opti-E, Selenium TR, Aqua Gem-E, MTE-7, Chromic Chloride Hexahydrate/Copper Sulfate/Manganese Sulfate/Selenium/Sodium Iodide/Zinc Sulfate, Vita-Plus E Natural, E-Max-1000, Multitrace-5, E-600

Many Early Colon Cancers Linked to Inherited Genes

Posted 15 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 – As many as 1 in 6 colon cancer patients under the age of 50 has genetic traits that greatly boost the risk of cancer, a new study finds. "The prevalence of hereditary cancer syndromes among early onset colorectal cancer patients including Lynch syndrome, was quite high, which presents a tremendous opportunity for us to save lives through early detection based on genomic risk factor," lead investigator Heather Hampel said in an Ohio State University news release. Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition. It increases the rate of many cancers, including colon cancer, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. "It is critical that people find out at a young age if they are genetically predisposed to cancer so they can take steps to prevent cancer from occurring at all," Hampel said. She's with the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative and is a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Some Low-Income, Uninsured Patients Aren't Referred for Colonoscopy

Posted 13 Dec 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 – Many low-income and uninsured patients don't have a follow-up colonoscopy after abnormal results on a colon cancer screening test – even if they're in a "safety net" health program, a new study finds. A safety net health system provides significant care to vulnerable patients, regardless of their income. This study included more than 2,200 such patients, ages 50 to 75, in the San Francisco Health Network. This safety net system includes several hospitals and clinics in the area. All of the study participants had positive findings on a fecal blood test between April 2012 and February 2015. A fecal blood test is a noninvasive exam that checks for blood in the stool, a possible indication of colon cancer. If blood is detected, the risk of colon cancer is about 10 times higher than for someone who doesn't have blood in their stool, the researchers said. That's why ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Additive in Processed Foods Tied to Colon Cancer in Mice

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 – An additive used in most processed foods may be linked to colon cancer in mice, a new study suggests. Emulsifiers are added to foods to improve texture and extend shelf life, the study researchers said. In mice, regular consumption of two commonly used emulsifiers led to changes in intestinal bacteria that promoted inflammation and colon cancer, the researchers found. The two emulsifiers are polysorbate 80 and carboxymethylcellulose. Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. There is increasing evidence that intestinal microbes play a role in colon cancer, according to the Georgia State University researchers. "The incidence of colorectal cancer has been markedly increasing since the mid-20th century," said Emilie Viennois, an assistant professor at Georgia State's Institute for Biomedical Sciences. "A key feature of this disease is the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Colon Cancer's Location May Determine Patient Survival

Posted 27 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 – Where in the colon a cancer develops could affect a patient's chances for survival, a new report finds. At issue are so-called left-sided and right-sided colon cancers, one oncologist who reviewed the findings explained. "Left-sided cancers are located closer to the anus and located in the rectum, sigmoid colon and descending colon," said Dr. David Bernstein, chief of hepatology at Northwell Health in Manhasset, N.Y. "These cancers usually present with bleeding or partial obstruction [and] because of this presentation, patients tend to seek medical care earlier." On the other hand, "right-sided lesions – located in the first part of the colon, near the junction with the small intestine – do not typically present with obstruction but tend to present with anemia and are more likely to be associated with metastatic disease, especially to the liver," Bernstein ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Little Gains in Efforts to Boost Outpatient Care

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Efforts to improve the quality of care in the United States have had little impact on many aspects of outpatient care, a new, sweeping analysis shows. The researchers examined the quality of office-based care – meaning visits to physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners – between 2002 and 2013. Ongoing deficits in care "pose serious hazards to the health of the American public," the study authors concluded. One in four eligible Americans, for example, failed to receive recommended cancer screening. "That didn't change at all over 10 years and, in fact, got worse in places like mammography and cervical cancer screening," said study author Dr. David Levine. Levine is an internist and research fellow at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Levine and his team also identified wasteful spending and possible harm due to ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Colonoscopy, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Body Imaging

To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut'

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Sometimes following up on a gut feeling can make the difference between life and death, especially for people with colon cancer, researchers report. People who pay attention to their digestive system are more likely to notice worrisome symptoms and seek medical attention sooner, said Dr. Amit Singal and colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. And when colon cancer is caught early, it is usually easier to treat, Singal explained. "The old saying 'listen to your gut' holds true when it comes to your health. If you notice differences that persist more than a week, contact your physician," he said in a hospital news release. Singal is a gastroenterologist and an associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences. "Many conditions can cause digestive symptoms, but if it is cancer and you catch it early, you'll have a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Study: Colonoscopy After 75 May Not Be Worth It

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – A colonoscopy can find and remove cancerous growths in the colon, but it may not provide much cancer prevention benefit after the age of 75, a new study suggests. A review of more than 1.3 million Medicare patients aged 70 to 79 found that having a colonoscopy reduced colon cancer risk slightly over eight years, from just under 3 percent to a little more than 2 percent in those younger than 75. But it had little or no effect on cancer risk among patients over 75. However, Robert Smith, vice president for cancer screening at the American Cancer Society, said it would be misguided to stop all colonoscopies for people once they turn 75. The better criterion is the overall health and life expectancy of the patient, he said. "The issue is with older adults whether or not there is any benefit for screening. After 75, you can make individualized decisions [about] ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Researchers Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return

Posted 9 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – A blood test that detects bits of DNA shed from colon cancers may someday help doctors predict a relapse, researchers report. This "liquid biopsy" predicted – with imperfect accuracy – the return of colon cancer in patients with early forms of the disease, the team said. "Although this and other DNA-based blood tests are not perfect, this study shows that when we find tumor DNA circulating in the blood of cancer patients, recurrence is very likely," said study co-author Nickolas Papadopoulos. He is professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. As the researchers explained, stage 2 colon tumors generally have not yet spread to other organs in the body. This makes it tough to determine which patients stand to benefit from chemotherapy after their surgery. "Some of these [stage 2] cancers will recur, and we need to ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 4, 2016 – Making regular visits to a primary care doctor increases the odds you'll be screened for colon cancer, a new study says. Colon cancer is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. But colon cancer screening is underused, the study authors said. "These findings help underscore the continued importance and effectiveness of visits with primary care physicians in a brave new world of virtual care and population health outreach," said study co-author Dr. Ethan Halm. He is director of the UT Southwestern Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research in Dallas. The study researchers analyzed data from more than 968,000 Americans, aged 50 to 74, in four health systems across the country. Those who saw a primary care doctor at least once a year were twice as likely to be screened for colon cancer. And they were 30 ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

Posted 24 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon cancer. The findings are from an analysis of genes from more than 1,000 people with colon cancer. The links between these five gene mutations were very rare, so further research is needed to confirm if they're actually associated with colon cancer. The study authors also concluded that all the major genes that significantly increase the risk of colon cancer have been identified. "Our study is the largest ever conducted of the genetics of bowel [colon] cancer, and sets out a detailed map of the disease that could lead us to new ways of treating or preventing it," study leader Richard Houlston, a professor of molecular and population genetics at the Institute of Cancer Research in London, said in an institute news release. "The research closes one chapter in the study of bowel cancer, by ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

A Little Guidance Is Key to Getting That Cancer Screen

Posted 22 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 – The use of patient navigators – people who help patients receive health care services – improved cancer screening rates among low-income and ethnic minority patients, a new study reports. "These findings demonstrate how effective patient navigators can be for patients who, for a variety of reasons, encounter obstacles to receiving cancer screening," said study author Dr. Sanja Percac-Lima. She is physician leader for cancer outreach at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Community Health Improvement. "Health disparities pose a major challenge to low-income and ethnic minority patients, and our study suggests a proactive approach may help increase their chances of receiving the care they need," Percac-Lima explained in a hospital news release. The research included more than 1,600 patients at 18 MGH primary care practices. The patients were ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colonoscopy, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Testicular Cancer, History - Skin Cancer

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