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Colonoscopy News

Additive in Processed Foods Tied to Colon Cancer in Mice

Posted 8 Nov 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 – An additive used in most processed foods may be linked to colon cancer in mice, a new study suggests. Emulsifiers are added to foods to improve texture and extend shelf life, the study researchers said. In mice, regular consumption of two commonly used emulsifiers led to changes in intestinal bacteria that promoted inflammation and colon cancer, the researchers found. The two emulsifiers are polysorbate 80 and carboxymethylcellulose. Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. There is increasing evidence that intestinal microbes play a role in colon cancer, according to the Georgia State University researchers. "The incidence of colorectal cancer has been markedly increasing since the mid-20th century," said Emilie Viennois, an assistant professor at Georgia State's Institute for Biomedical Sciences. "A key feature of this disease is the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Colon Cancer's Location May Determine Patient Survival

Posted 27 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 – Where in the colon a cancer develops could affect a patient's chances for survival, a new report finds. At issue are so-called left-sided and right-sided colon cancers, one oncologist who reviewed the findings explained. "Left-sided cancers are located closer to the anus and located in the rectum, sigmoid colon and descending colon," said Dr. David Bernstein, chief of hepatology at Northwell Health in Manhasset, N.Y. "These cancers usually present with bleeding or partial obstruction [and] because of this presentation, patients tend to seek medical care earlier." On the other hand, "right-sided lesions – located in the first part of the colon, near the junction with the small intestine – do not typically present with obstruction but tend to present with anemia and are more likely to be associated with metastatic disease, especially to the liver," Bernstein ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Little Gains in Efforts to Boost Outpatient Care

Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 – Efforts to improve the quality of care in the United States have had little impact on many aspects of outpatient care, a new, sweeping analysis shows. The researchers examined the quality of office-based care – meaning visits to physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners – between 2002 and 2013. Ongoing deficits in care "pose serious hazards to the health of the American public," the study authors concluded. One in four eligible Americans, for example, failed to receive recommended cancer screening. "That didn't change at all over 10 years and, in fact, got worse in places like mammography and cervical cancer screening," said study author Dr. David Levine. Levine is an internist and research fellow at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Levine and his team also identified wasteful spending and possible harm due to ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Colonoscopy, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Body Imaging

To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut'

Posted 27 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 – Sometimes following up on a gut feeling can make the difference between life and death, especially for people with colon cancer, researchers report. People who pay attention to their digestive system are more likely to notice worrisome symptoms and seek medical attention sooner, said Dr. Amit Singal and colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. And when colon cancer is caught early, it is usually easier to treat, Singal explained. "The old saying 'listen to your gut' holds true when it comes to your health. If you notice differences that persist more than a week, contact your physician," he said in a hospital news release. Singal is a gastroenterologist and an associate professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences. "Many conditions can cause digestive symptoms, but if it is cancer and you catch it early, you'll have a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Study: Colonoscopy After 75 May Not Be Worth It

Posted 26 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 – A colonoscopy can find and remove cancerous growths in the colon, but it may not provide much cancer prevention benefit after the age of 75, a new study suggests. A review of more than 1.3 million Medicare patients aged 70 to 79 found that having a colonoscopy reduced colon cancer risk slightly over eight years, from just under 3 percent to a little more than 2 percent in those younger than 75. But it had little or no effect on cancer risk among patients over 75. However, Robert Smith, vice president for cancer screening at the American Cancer Society, said it would be misguided to stop all colonoscopies for people once they turn 75. The better criterion is the overall health and life expectancy of the patient, he said. "The issue is with older adults whether or not there is any benefit for screening. After 75, you can make individualized decisions [about] ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Researchers Get Closer to Test Predicting Colon Cancer's Return

Posted 9 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 7, 2016 – A blood test that detects bits of DNA shed from colon cancers may someday help doctors predict a relapse, researchers report. This "liquid biopsy" predicted – with imperfect accuracy – the return of colon cancer in patients with early forms of the disease, the team said. "Although this and other DNA-based blood tests are not perfect, this study shows that when we find tumor DNA circulating in the blood of cancer patients, recurrence is very likely," said study co-author Nickolas Papadopoulos. He is professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore. As the researchers explained, stage 2 colon tumors generally have not yet spread to other organs in the body. This makes it tough to determine which patients stand to benefit from chemotherapy after their surgery. "Some of these [stage 2] cancers will recur, and we need to ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Regular Doctor Visits Can Help Spot Colon Cancer

Posted 5 Jul 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 4, 2016 – Making regular visits to a primary care doctor increases the odds you'll be screened for colon cancer, a new study says. Colon cancer is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. But colon cancer screening is underused, the study authors said. "These findings help underscore the continued importance and effectiveness of visits with primary care physicians in a brave new world of virtual care and population health outreach," said study co-author Dr. Ethan Halm. He is director of the UT Southwestern Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research in Dallas. The study researchers analyzed data from more than 968,000 Americans, aged 50 to 74, in four health systems across the country. Those who saw a primary care doctor at least once a year were twice as likely to be screened for colon cancer. And they were 30 ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Five New Genes Linked to Colon Cancer

Posted 24 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 24, 2016 – Scientists have identified five new gene mutations that may be tied to colon cancer. The findings are from an analysis of genes from more than 1,000 people with colon cancer. The links between these five gene mutations were very rare, so further research is needed to confirm if they're actually associated with colon cancer. The study authors also concluded that all the major genes that significantly increase the risk of colon cancer have been identified. "Our study is the largest ever conducted of the genetics of bowel [colon] cancer, and sets out a detailed map of the disease that could lead us to new ways of treating or preventing it," study leader Richard Houlston, a professor of molecular and population genetics at the Institute of Cancer Research in London, said in an institute news release. "The research closes one chapter in the study of bowel cancer, by ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

A Little Guidance Is Key to Getting That Cancer Screen

Posted 22 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 – The use of patient navigators – people who help patients receive health care services – improved cancer screening rates among low-income and ethnic minority patients, a new study reports. "These findings demonstrate how effective patient navigators can be for patients who, for a variety of reasons, encounter obstacles to receiving cancer screening," said study author Dr. Sanja Percac-Lima. She is physician leader for cancer outreach at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Community Health Improvement. "Health disparities pose a major challenge to low-income and ethnic minority patients, and our study suggests a proactive approach may help increase their chances of receiving the care they need," Percac-Lima explained in a hospital news release. The research included more than 1,600 patients at 18 MGH primary care practices. The patients were ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Colonoscopy, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Testicular Cancer, History - Skin Cancer

Expert Panel Reaffirms Need for Colon Cancer Screen Beginning at Age 50

Posted 15 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 15, 2016 – Reiterating a recommendation last made in 2008, an influential U.S. panel of health experts is advocating that regular colon cancer screening begin at age 50 and continue until at least age 75. However, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force stopped short of saying any one screening method was better than another. "There are multiple screening options for colorectal cancer that reduce the risk of dying from the disease. We encourage people to choose the best option for them, in consultation with their clinician," former Task Force member Dr. Douglas Owens said Wednesday in a USPSTF news release. The panel's reticence to choose one option over another may be at odds with the preference of many doctors, who often advise colonoscopy as the "gold standard" test. Dr. Arun Swaminath is one of them. "There is only one test – colonoscopy – that can both diagnose a ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Colon Cancer Rising in People Under 50

Posted 24 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – Although overall colon cancer rates are declining, the rates among Americans under 50 have jumped more than 11 percent in the past decade, a new study finds. Over the same decade, the number of cancers in those 50 and older fell by nearly 3 percent, the study found. "Our findings suggest that health care providers should be more vigilant about detecting symptoms in younger patients and also should consider lowering the threshold for colonoscopy screening," lead researcher Dr. Elie Sutton said during a media briefing. Sutton is a research fellow at Mount Sinai West Hospital in New York City. "We really don't know why colon cancer is increasing in younger patients," he said. "We can speculate that it's due to increases in inflammatory bowel disease or a change in diet, but really there is no clear consensus on that." The researchers also found that colon cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Dietary Supplementation, Colorectal Cancer, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Dietary Fiber Supplementation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Time to Drop the 'No-Eating Rule' Before Colonoscopy?

Posted 24 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 24, 2016 – New research suggests that the grueling process of preparing for a colonoscopy may not have to be endured on an empty stomach. Colonoscopy patients typically have to forgo all solid foods and go on a clear-liquid diet while taking laxatives the day before their procedure. However, this new study found that those who ate a limited amount of low-fiber foods were happier and didn't suffer any negative effects during their exam. In fact, their bowels were actually better prepared for the procedure than those of the patients who stuck to traditional clear-liquid diets, the researchers said. "The assumptions about no food on the day before colonoscopy are probably not correct. The clear-liquid diet is very restrictive, and probably too restrictive," said study author Dr. Jason Samarasena. He is an assistant clinical professor of medicine with the division of ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Diagnosis and Investigation, Dietary Fiber Supplementation

Tumor Location Affects Colon Cancer Survival: Study

Posted 19 May 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Your survival odds against colon cancer may depend on which side of your colon the tumor develops, new research contends. In a study of more than 1,000 men and women with colon cancer that had spread, those whose tumor was on the left side survived just over 33 months, while those whose tumor was on the right side survived only slightly more than 19 months. "It's a stunning and surprising finding, and the difference is dramatic," said lead researcher Dr. Alan Venook, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. It appears that colon cancer that begins on the right side is different from colon cancer that begins on the left side, he said. "We thought of the colon as a tube that propelled stool out of the body, but it's not that simple," Venook said. "Each side of the colon starts in a different place, which is why the cancers are ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Avastin, Erbitux, Bevacizumab, Cetuximab, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Statins Might Not Lower Colon Cancer Risk: Study

Posted 26 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 26, 2016 – Long-term use of cholesterol-lowering statins does not appear to reduce the risk of colon cancer, but a person's cholesterol levels might affect risk, a new study suggests. Both statins and cholesterol levels have been linked with lower colon cancer risk, but pinpointing which one is actually responsible has been difficult, the University of Pennsylvania researchers explained. So, they compared statin use and cholesterol levels in more than 22,000 British patients with colon cancer and more than 86,500 without the disease. The results confirmed findings from previous studies that showed a lower risk of colon cancer in people who take statins. But the risk was not significantly different between people who kept taking statins and those who stopped taking the drugs. Instead, the higher the cholesterol level, the lower the colon cancer risk for patients, ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Colonoscopy, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Colorectal Cancer, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Vytorin, Pravachol, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Caduet, Simcor, Lescol, Lescol XL, Mevacor

Small Study Supports New Stool-Based Colon Cancer Test

Posted 19 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 – A new, but small, study finds more evidence that a recently approved, stool-based colon cancer test may be effective for certain patients. Still, experts who looked at the findings stressed that the test, called Cologuard, should never be used as a substitute for the "gold standard" colon cancer test, colonoscopy. Cologuard is a noninvasive stool DNA test that detects red blood cells and certain DNA mutations that are associated with colon cancer. The test was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2014. The new study included nearly 400 people at average risk for colon cancer, meaning they had no symptoms and no personal or family history of the disease or precancerous polyps. The patients had also not yet undergone more invasive screening procedures, such as colonoscopy. At one year of follow-up, 51 of the patients (about 15 percent) had a ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

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