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Colonoscopy News

Blacks More Prone to Colon Cancers That Arise Between Colonoscopies: Study

Posted 2 hours 45 minutes ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 22, 2017 – Colon cancer guidelines now recommend a colonoscopy every 10 years, beginning at age 50 for people at average risk for the disease. But a new study finds that older black Americans are far more likely than whites to develop a colon cancer in the decade-long gap between these screenings. Some of this may be due to where black patients receive their colonoscopy, the researchers said. "Blacks and other minorities more frequently received colonoscopies from physicians with lower [colon] polyp detection rates, suggesting there was lower quality of care," said study lead author Stacey Fedewa, a researcher with the American Cancer Society. Speaking in society news release, she said the findings "are consistent with previous reports that blacks were more likely to receive health care from physicians in lower resource settings." In the study, Fedewa's team tracked data ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Nuts! Good Medicine for Colon Cancer Survivors?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 – Colon cancer patients might improve their chances of survival if they eat nuts along with an overall healthy diet and regular exercise, two new studies report. In a seven-year study, patients successfully treated for stage 3 colon cancer who ate at least 2 ounces of nuts a week had a 42 percent lower chance of their cancer coming back and a 57 percent lower risk of dying from the disease. Stage 3 means the cancer may have spread to surrounding tissues, but hasn't spread to distant organs. These preliminary findings jibe with those of a second trial. That study found that colon cancer survivors with the highest healthy lifestyle scores – eating right, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight – had a 42 percent lower risk of death than those with the lowest scores. Both studies are scheduled for presentation next month at the annual meeting of the American ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Get Ready for Your 'Capsule Robot' Colon Cancer Check

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 – Not looking forward to your next colonoscopy? Don't worry – in the future, a tiny capsule less than an inch long may navigate your colon to check for cancer risk, scientists report. Researchers at Nashville's Vanderbilt University Medical Center used magnets to guide the tethered "capsule robot" through a pig's colon. "Not only is the capsule robot able to actively maneuver through the GI tract to perform diagnostics, it is also able to perform therapeutic maneuvers, such as biopsies of tissue or polyp removal, due to the tether – something that other capsule devices are unable to do," lead researcher Dr. Keith Obstein explained. His team said the magnetized capsule robot is 0.7 inches long and inserted rectally. It's then guided through the colon by using an external magnet that's attached to a robotic arm. The capsule also has an attached tether that is much ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Delay a Needed Colonoscopy at Your Own Risk

Posted 25 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 – People who wait too long to get a colonoscopy after a "positive" screening test for colon cancer may face a heightened risk of the disease, a new study finds. The study asked a fundamental question: If a stool test suggests someone might have cancer, how long can someone safely wait to have a colonoscopy? Colonoscopy is a procedure that uses a thin, flexible tube with a camera on the end to allow your doctor to see inside your colon. The study found that some delay appeared to cause no harm. People who had a follow-up colonoscopy within 10 months faced no greater risk of colon cancer than those who had their colonoscopy within one month. But when the wait was longer, the cancer risk rose. After 10 months, the risk of colon cancer was roughly 50 percent to two times greater. And the odds of being diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer were two to three times ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Many Disabled Adults Aren't Screened for Colon Cancer: Study

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 – American adults with disabilities have lower colon cancer screening rates than other adults, a new study finds. Researchers reviewed South Carolina Medicaid and Medicare claims, state health plan claims and hospital discharge data from 2000 to 2009. About 48 percent of the general population reported having routine screenings, compared to 34 percent of those with intellectual disabilities; 44 percent of those with spinal cord injuries, and 46 percent of people with blindness or limited sight. "These individuals may not be routinely screened for colon cancer due to a lack of education and awareness, transportation challenges or other barriers," study author Chelsea Deroche said in a University of Missouri-Columbia news release. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Management and Informatics. "These findings support the need for increased ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Precancerous Colon Growths

Posted 5 Apr 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 4, 2017 – Taking antibiotics for an extended period in early to middle adulthood might increase your risk for precancerous growths in your colon, a large study suggests. Women who took antibiotics for two weeks or more in their 20s through their 50s were more likely to have colon lesions in their 60s than women who didn't take the drugs for an extended period, researchers found. If not removed, these lesions – called polyps or adenomas – can lead to colon cancer. "This suggests that alterations in the naturally occurring bacteria that live in one's intestines caused by antibiotics might predispose individuals to colorectal cancer," said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Chan. But, although the risk for colon cancer was raised, it wasn't to a level "where it should worry individuals who need to take antibiotics for clear medical reasons," said Chan, an associate professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Many Dialysis Patients Get Unnecessary Colonoscopies

Posted 24 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 – Older Americans on kidney dialysis have high rates of colonoscopy screening for colon cancer, but most get little benefit from the screening, a new study suggests. Dialysis patients have high rates of death, so routine colon cancer screening doesn't improve survival for most dialysis patients who don't qualify for a kidney transplant. Therefore, dialysis patients who have a limited life expectancy and no signs or symptoms of colon cancer shouldn't undergo screening for the disease, according to the American Society of Nephrology. "Physicians should carefully evaluate patients' prognoses and consider the likelihood that they will truly benefit before ordering screening tests," said study co-leader Dr. Christopher Carlos, from the University of California, San Francisco. In this study, researchers reviewed data from more than 469,000 Medicare beneficiaries. They ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Renal Failure, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Transplant, Chronic Kidney Disease, Hemodialysis, Peritoneal dialysis

Keep Colon Cancer at Bay

Posted 22 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 – Colon cancer can be treated and cured if it's diagnosed early, and a colonoscopy is one of the best ways to detect the disease, a gastroenterologist says. "Routine colonoscopy exams are lifesavers and may reduce your risk of succumbing to colorectal cancer by 90 percent," said Dr. Ellen Gutkin, from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Queens. Even healthy adults with no family or medical history of colon cancer should get routine colonoscopies. The cancer can develop without symptoms and once symptoms begin, it could mean the cancer is more advanced and less likely to be cured. Gutkin noted that women and men have the same risk for colon cancer, and that having no risk factors does not mean you won't develop the disease. "The single biggest modifiable risk factor for colorectal cancer is a failure to be screened," she said in a hospital news release. Beginning at ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening

Posted 21 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 – If you've got a family history of colon or rectal cancers, you probably need to start screening for these conditions before you turn 50, a cancer expert says. People with a close relative who has had colon or rectal cancer have a greater risk of being diagnosed with these cancers too, said Dr. Walter Koltun, chief of colon and rectal surgery at the Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center in a hospital news release. "A significant portion of the population does have those risk factors," Koltun said. "And their risk goes up significantly depending on who has been affected." If more than one close relative has had colon or rectal cancer, your risk of getting such a cancer is 12 times greater, he added. People who are diagnosed with colon or rectal cancers at a young age are more likely to have a genetic trait that could increase their risk for the disease. ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Crohn's Disease, Colonoscopy, Prostate Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, History - Radiation Therapy

Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50

Posted 1 Mar 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 – In some good news for older Americans, a new report shows that colorectal cancer rates among those over 50 fell 32 percent since 2000, while deaths from the disease fell by 34 percent. Those declines are likely due to increased screening, which can prevent colorectal cancer by detecting and removing precancerous polyps, according to the report released March 1 by the American Cancer Society (ACS). Among older adults, colorectal cancer rates are dropping fastest in those aged 65 and older, and for tumors located in the distal colon (the last part of the colon). The drop is slowest among those aged 50 to 64 and for rectal tumors, the researchers found. For example, there was a 9 percent decline in the incidence of rectal tumors in men aged 50 to 64 and no decline among women in the same age group. But those rates dropped 38 percent in men and 41 percent in ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Live Healthy, Live Longer

Posted 24 Feb 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 – Want to live a longer, healthier life? Try five simple lifestyle recommendations, a public health expert says. "Stay up to date on immunizations, screening exams for specific types of cancer [e.g., colorectal cancer screening for men and women, and breast and cervical cancer screening for women], and screening blood tests for conditions such as diabetes and HIV," said Dr. Paul Erwin, head of the department of public health at the University of Tennessee. Regular exercise is also important, he added. "Current recommendations call for 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise [or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity]," Erwin said. "If you are not into running, swimming or yoga, try mowing the lawn with a push mower rather than a riding lawn mower," he added. "Park at the far end of the parking lot rather than ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Colonoscopy, Smoking Cessation, Colorectal Cancer, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cervical Cancer, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says

Posted 26 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 – Researchers think they know why a diet high in whole grains and fiber might lower the risk of certain types of colon cancer. The mechanism behind this link appears to be a type of intestinal bacteria, the Boston research team said. Specifically, they looked at Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is among hundreds of types of bacteria found in the large intestine. It's believed to play a role in colon cancer. The researchers tracked the diets of more than 137,000 people for decades and examined more than 1,000 colon tumor samples. They found that people who ate a diet high in whole grains and fiber had a lower risk of colon cancer containing F. nucleatum, but not for colon cancer without this type of bacteria. "Though our research dealt with only one type of bacteria, it points to a much broader phenomenon – that intestinal bacteria can act in concert with diet to ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Is Chemo Overused in Younger Colon Cancer Patients?

Posted 25 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 – Young and middle-aged colon cancer patients may be getting chemotherapy more often than is warranted, a new study suggests. "Most of the young patients received postoperative systemic chemotherapy, including multi-[drug] regimens, which are currently not recommended for most patients with early stage colon cancer," the study authors wrote. The research team was led by Dr. Kangmin Zhu from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. Overall, the findings "suggest overtreatment of young and middle-aged adults with colon cancer," Zhu and colleagues concluded. One colon cancer expert who reviewed the study said it addresses an often difficult question. "There is a rising trend of younger patients being diagnosed with colon cancer," said Dr. Anna Levy. She's an oncologist at Northwell Health Cancer Institute in Lake Success, N.Y. "The premise ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Nausea/Vomiting - Chemotherapy Induced, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Even a Little Daily Activity May Boost Colon Cancer Survival: Study

Posted 17 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2017 – Just a half hour a day of moderate physical activity could be potent medicine for patients with advanced colon cancer, preliminary research suggests. Study authors who tracked more than 1,200 colon cancer patients found a 19 percent decline in risk for early death among those who got 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise daily. And, five or more hours of moderate – but non-vigorous – activity a week pushed that survival benefit to 25 percent, researchers said. Walking, cleaning or gardening counted as moderate exercise, the study authors said. Exercise benefits previously have been reported for early stage cancer patients. "But this study extends to patients who have advanced cancer and a much more grim prognosis," said Dr. Andrew Chan. He's an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. "And even among that population, there seems ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Colorectal Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

Study Questions 'Fecal Transplant' Treatment for Gut Infection

Posted 13 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 – A single fecal transplant delivered by enema is apparently no more effective than oral antibiotics in treating recurring cases of a nasty stomach bug, a Canadian study contends. The study is the first head-to-head comparison between fecal transplant and the current standard of care of antibiotics in treating Clostridium difficile infection, the researchers said. "We thought it was important to have that comparison so we could know: How much better is it than what we're actually already doing?" said lead author Dr. Susy Hota. She's the medical director of infection prevention and control at University Health Network in Toronto. In this study, "it looks like they're working about the same," Hota said. "In half the patients, it didn't work, but in the other half, it did." Infection from C. difficile bacteria can be debilitating, triggering bouts of diarrhea and ... Read more

Related support groups: Colonoscopy, Clostridial Infection, Diagnosis and Investigation, Prevention of Clostridium Difficile Infection Recurrence

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