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Asthma in America Carries $82 Billion Price Tag

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 – The economic cost of asthma in the United States is nearly $82 billion a year, federal health officials report. That figure includes medical expenses and costs associated with work and school absences and deaths. However, the true cost of asthma is probably underestimated because the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study did not include people with untreated asthma. The new analysis was based on federal government data, collected from 2008 to 2013. It showed that about 15.4 million people were treated for asthma each year. The annual per-person medical cost of asthma was $3,266. Of that per-person amount, $1,830 was for prescriptions, $640 for office visits, $529 for hospitalizations, $176 for hospital outpatient visits and $105 for emergency room care. Asthma-related deaths cost $29 billion a year, with an average of 3,168 deaths a year. Asthma ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Fluticasone, Qvar, Asthma - Acute, Budesonide, Flovent, Entocort, Entocort EC, Mometasone, Beclomethasone, Uceris, Pulmicort Flexhaler, Alvesco, Pulmicort Turbuhaler, Asmanex Twisthaler, Gastrocrom, Cromolyn, Allergic Asthma, Flovent HFA

As CHIP Money Runs Out, Millions of U.S. Kids May Lose Health Care

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 11, 2018 – Time is running out for millions of American kids covered by the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Stopgap funding for the federal program for these kids will expire Jan. 19. Soon thereafter, states will begin to cut kids' coverage as the money runs dry, experts say. Nearly 1.7 million children on CHIP in 20 states could lose coverage by the end of February, according to a new analysis from the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute. "They're projecting that a number of states could lack sufficient funds to keep their programs going," said Genevieve Kenney, co-director of the Urban Institute's Health Policy Center. "They're seeing this happening in February and March, so notices closing up programs to new applicants could start going out in just a couple of weeks." In fact, 10 states are expected to exhaust all their CHIP funds before the end ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Autism, Asthma - Acute, Asperger Syndrome

Asthma Worse for Overweight Preschoolers: Study

Posted 19 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 28, 2017 – Preschoolers with asthma may have worse symptoms if they're overweight. Compared to those with a healthy weight, heavy kids with untreated asthma had 37 more days with symptoms a year, according to a new report. The study findings show that "early life weight gain does worsen the severity of asthma in the youngest patients," said study leader and lung specialist Dr. Jason Lang. "Weight does not hamper the effectiveness of inhaled steroids in preschoolers, but this study provides clear evidence that maintaining a healthy weight in preschoolers may be an effective strategy for controlling asthma," Lang added. He directs Duke University School of Medicine's children's pulmonary function laboratory. Nearly 10 percent of children in the United States have asthma, the study authors noted. The respiratory condition is a leading cause of emergency room visits and ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Allergic Asthma

Boxed Warning Removed From LABA/ICS Combination Asthma Medications: FDA

Posted 21 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

New evidence regarding safety is spurring the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to remove a Boxed Warning from certain inhaled medications used to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The decision applies to a class of medications known as Long-Acting Beta Agonists (LABAs) used in combination with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) medicines. These medicines include brand name products such as Advair, Airduo, Breo, Dulera and Symbicort. In 2011, the FDA told makers of such medicines to conduct large safety trials to assess the risk of serious side effects such as hospitalization, intubation and death among asthma patients. A review of data from those trials found that treating asthma with LABAs in combination with ICS medicines "does not result in significantly more serious asthma-related side effects than ICS alone. Based on these results, the FDA has approved ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Asthma - Maintenance, Symbicort, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Maintenance, Advair Diskus, Asthma - Acute, Breo Ellipta, Dulera, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Acute, Reversible Airways Disease, AirDuo Respiclick

Overweight Kids Don't Have to Be Overweight Adults

Posted 20 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 20, 2017 – Overweight children often become obese adults, with attendant problems such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. But a new study suggests there are "critical windows" where that path to weight gain can be changed. The study, involving more than 2,700 Finnish adults, found what many studies have shown before: Childhood body mass index, or BMI, is a good predictor of adulthood obesity. People who became obese as adults tended to already be heavier than their peers by the age of 6. That suggests, the researchers said, that early childhood is a key period for preventing obesity later on. But the findings also point to a "second critical window," said lead study author Marie-Jeanne Buscot, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Tasmania in Australia. The teenage years appeared vital, too, the study found. That's because not everyone who was heavy as a ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Asthma, Heart Disease, Asthma - Maintenance, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Asthma - Acute, Diabetes Mellitus, Allergic Asthma, Ischemic Heart Disease

Heavy Particles in Smog Up Kids' Asthma Risk

Posted 20 Dec 2017 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 20, 2017 – Children who inhale coarse particles – like dust, sand or even rubber emissions from tires – increase their chances of developing serious asthma, new research indicates. The finding comes from the analysis of data on 8 million young people, 5 to 20 years old, in 34 U.S. states. It focused on the impact of their exposure to tiny bits of so-called "coarse" matter that are far thinner than a human hair. In the end, investigators from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine determined that the more a child is exposed to such coarse matter, the more their asthma risk increased. "Regulation and monitoring of this part of air pollution may need to be considered," study first author Dr. Corinne Keet said in a news release from Johns Hopkins Medicine. She is an associated professor of pediatrics at the medical school. Specifically, Keet and colleagues tallied the ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Respiratory Tract Disease, Allergic Asthma

Can Trees Curb Asthma Flare-Ups in Polluted Cities?

Posted 27 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 – Urban air pollution can trigger asthma. But lots of trees in cities might lower the odds of a flare-up, a new British study finds. "We wanted to clarify how urban vegetation may be related to respiratory health," said study leader Ian Alcock of the University of Exeter Medical School. "We know that trees remove the air pollutants which can bring on asthma attacks, but in some situations they can also cause localized buildups of particulates by preventing their dispersion by wind. And vegetation can also produce allergenic pollen which exacerbates asthma," added Alcock, a research fellow. His team analyzed data on more than 650,000 asthma-related hospitalizations that occurred among urban residents in England over 15 years. In neighborhoods with the highest levels of air pollution, an extra 300 trees per square kilometer (0.4 square mile) was associated with ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

FDA Approves Fasenra (benralizumab) for Severe Eosinophilic Asthma

Posted 15 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

November 14, 2017 – AstraZeneca (NYSE:AZN) and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Fasenra (benralizumab) for the add-on maintenance treatment of patients with severe asthma aged 12 years and older, and with an eosinophilic phenotype. Fasenra is not approved for the treatment of other eosinophilic conditions or relief of acute bronchospasm or status asthmaticus. Pascal Soriot, Chief Executive Officer of AstraZeneca, said: “We’re excited to offer Fasenra as a new precision biologic to help improve the lives of severe asthma patients whose disease is driven by eosinophilic inflammation. This is the first approval from our respiratory biologics portfolio and the latest in a series of significant milestones for our company as we deliver on our pipeline-driven transformation.” The FDA appr ... Read more

Related support groups: Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Fasenra, Benralizumab

Working With Your School Nurse

Posted 3 Nov 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 – Nearly 18 percent of kids have a chronic health condition, such as asthma or allergies. If your child is one of them, working successfully with your school's nurse will help keep him or her safe. Because a good chunk of a child's day is spent in school, it's important to communicate clearly and regularly with this key member of the administration. Start every school year with a visit to the nurse's office to drop off medication and paperwork from your pediatrician. The nurse will likely develop an individualized health care plan, or IHCP, that's based on the doctor's written action plan. Depending on your child's age, the medication permission form will state if he or she can carry and use medication on his or her own, although the school may have its own rules about this. Be very specific in your discussions. For example, if your child has asthma, the school ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Zyrtec, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Phenergan, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone

Health Tip: Have Fun on Halloween, Despite Asthma

Posted 31 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

-- Halloween is a favorite holiday for children, but kids with asthma need to take special precautions. The American Lung Association suggests how to keep your asthmatic child safer during Halloween: Avoid fright fests – Activities such as hayrides, corn mazes and visiting haunted houses can trigger an asthmatic episode. If your child participates in these activities, make sure the child carries quick-relief medication at all times. Do not use masks – Costumes and masks may contain latex, a common asthma trigger. Read labels on costumes and masks to see if they contain this ingredient. Avoid makeup – Costume makeup may have a strong odor that could trigger asthma. If possible, skip makeup or use unscented and hypoallergenic products. Stay out of the leaves – It is fun to jump in leaves, but they may contain molds and fungus, which are common asthma triggers. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Can Man's Best Friend Chase Away Eczema, Asthma?

Posted 27 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 27, 2017 – Parents of children struggling with eczema or asthma might think that having a dog would only make it harder to control their child's condition. But two new studies suggest man's furry best friend might actually provide some protection against allergic diseases. The first study contends that having a dog in the house before you're even born may help keep eczema at bay at least until your toddler years. The skin disorder is marked by dry, extremely itchy patches. "Eczema is usually the first manifestation of [allergic disease] and eczema can predict the development of other [allergic diseases] as kids grow," said study author Dr. Gagandeep Cheema, an allergy and immunology fellow at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The researchers analyzed 782 mother-child pairs and collected data on prenatal exposure to dogs, which included days where a dog spent at least one ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Zyrtec, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Phenergan, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Allegra, Hay Fever, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone

Exercising With Asthma or Allergies

Posted 20 Oct 2017 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 20, 2017 – Allergies and asthma can make exercise more challenging. But if your condition is well managed and you take a few precautions, you should be able to work out without worry. Know your allergy or asthma triggers and exercise around them. For instance, when the pollen count is high, exercise indoors with windows and doors closed. When you do exercise outside, avoid high-allergen areas like grassy fields, parks and heavily trafficked roads. Dry air can be particularly irritating to people with asthma while moist air often makes exercise easier. That might mean skipping endurance activities like cross-country skiing in favor of swimming in an indoor pool. When exercising outdoors, breathe through your nose rather than your mouth as much as possible – nasal passages filter air and trap allergens and irritants. Long-distance running and high-energy basketball are ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Benadryl, Hydroxyzine, Promethazine, Zyrtec, Asthma - Maintenance, Claritin, Phenergan, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allegra, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Cyproheptadine, Atarax, Fluticasone, Ribavirin, Qvar

Could Pests, Dust Lower Kids' Odds for Asthma?

Posted 21 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 – Early exposure to pest and pet allergens – cockroaches and mice droppings included – may actually guard children against asthma, a new study of inner-city kids suggests. "This confirms a similar finding last year that June Cleaver was, in fact, wrong," said Dr. Kelvin MacDonald, a pediatric lung specialist at Doernbecher Children's Hospital in Oregon who reviewed the findings. "So the apron and string of pearls and Lysol-disinfected home are probably not to your benefit." But don't ditch your feather duster yet, Mom. If a child actually had asthma, then reducing exposure to these allergens helps control the respiratory condition. Plus, an analysis of dust from homes where kids developed the disease by age 7 found elevated levels of certain harmful bacteria, including some present in feces. And a child's asthma risk is significantly higher if their mom ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

Asthma Drug, Montelukast, Tied to Nightmares, Depression

Posted 21 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 – The asthma medication Singulair (montelukast) appears linked to neuropsychiatric side effects, such as depression, aggression, nightmares and headaches, according to a new review by Dutch researchers. But experts aren't yet ready to pull the plug on this class of medication. "In our study, we give prescribing physicians the advice to be alert for signs and symptoms for allergic granulomatous angiitis [a rare complication associated with the drug] and for severe neuropsychiatric symptoms," said study lead author Dr. Meindina Haarman. "The doctor still decides whether or not to treat the patients with montelukast," said Haarman, from University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands. Dr. Matthew Lorber is a psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He cautioned against discontinuing the medication in children with asthma, a lung disease that ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Headache, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Major Depressive Disorder, Asthma, Nightmares, Asthma - Maintenance, Singulair, Agitation, Night Terrors, Agitated State, Dysthymia, Asthma - Acute, Montelukast, Zyflo, Allergic Asthma, Zyflo CR, Accolate, Zafirlukast

Kids' Colds Linked to Asthma, Lung Problems Later

Posted 19 Sep 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 – Kids who develop respiratory infections like colds or sinusitis may have a higher risk of asthma and reduced lung function later in life, a new study says. Researchers examined data from nearly 155,000 children in Europe. They were followed from birth through ages 4 to 15 years. Those who had an upper respiratory infection – such as a cold, sinusitis, laryngitis and tonsillitis – by age 5 had an increased risk of asthma later in life. Their risk was 1.5 times higher. Young children who had lower respiratory tract infections such as bronchitis, bronchiolitis, pneumonia and general chest infections saw their asthma risk double or quadruple. They were also more likely to later develop reduced lung function, according to the study. "These findings support the hypothesis that early life respiratory tract infections may influence the development of respiratory ... Read more

Related support groups: Cough, Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Sinusitis, Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Asthma - Maintenance, Nasal Congestion, Cold Symptoms, Dyspnea, Sore Throat, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Asthma - Acute, Cough and Nasal Congestion, Bronchiectasis, Sinus Symptoms, Respiratory Tract Disease, Croup, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease

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