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Anascorp

Generic name: antivenom (Centruroides scorpion) (AN tee VEN um (SEN troo ROY dees SKOR pee on))
Brand name: Anascorp
Drug class: Antitoxins and antivenins

Medically reviewed by Philip Thornton, DipPharm. Last updated on Nov 5, 2021.

What is Anascorp?

Anascorp (centruroides scorpion) is an antivenom used to treat a person who has been stung by a scorpion.

Anascorp is supplied as a powder in a single-use injection vial. The contents of a vial are mixed with 5ml of sterile normal saline and administered by IV infusion over a 10 minute period.

Warnings

If you receive Anascorp during an emergency, make sure any follow-up doctor knows you received this medicine.

If possible before you receive Anascorp, tell your doctor if you are allergic to horses, or if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible before you are treated to tell your caregivers about your health conditions or if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for you afterward knows that you have received this medication.

You will be watched closely after receiving Anascorp, to make sure this medication is helping your condition. You may need to receive additional doses.

Some of the signs of a reaction to Anascorp may occur up to 2 weeks after you receive this medication.

Your doctor will need to check your progress at a follow-up visit. Do not miss any scheduled appointment.

Make sure any follow-up doctor knows you received this medicine.

Before taking this medicine

Anascorp is made from horse plasma and may contain viruses or other infectious agents. Donated plasma is tested and treated to reduce the risk of contamination, but there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Ask your doctor about any possible risk.

It is not known whether Anascorp will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether Centruroides scorpion antivenom passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. In an emergency situation it may not be possible before you are treated with Anascorp to tell your caregivers if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for your pregnancy or your baby knows you have received this medication.

How is Anascorp given?

You should receive Anascorp as soon as possible after you first have symptoms of a scorpion sting (such as slurred speech, increased salivation, vomiting, feeling short of breath, abnormal eye movements, or loss of muscle control).

Anascorp is injected into a vein by a healthcare provider.

Anascorp must be given over 10 minutes.

You will be watched for up to 60 minutes to make sure you do not have an allergic reaction.

You may need to additional doses every 30 to 60 minutes.

Your doctor will need to check your progress at a follow-up visit.

Dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Venomous Scorpion Bite:

Initial dose: 3 vials, IV over 10 minutes

If needed after initial dose: 1 vial, IV over 10 minutes, every 30 to 60 minutes

Comments:
-Start as soon as possible after scorpion sting in those with clinically important signs of envenomation (e.g. loss of muscle control, roving/abnormal eye movements, slurred speech, respiratory distress, excessive salivation, frothing at the mouth, vomiting).
-Monitor patient closely during, and up to 60 minutes after, infusion to see if clinically important envenomation symptoms resolve.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Venomous Scorpion Bite:

Initial dose: 3 vials, IV over 10 minutes

If needed after initial dose: 1 vial, IV over 10 minutes, every 30 to 60 minutes

Comments:
-Start as soon as possible after scorpion sting in those with clinically important signs of envenomation (e.g. loss of muscle control, roving/abnormal eye movements, slurred speech, respiratory distress, excessive salivation, frothing at the mouth, vomiting).
-Monitor patient closely during, and up to 60 minutes after, infusion to see if clinically important envenomation symptoms resolve.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since Anascorp is given by a healthcare professional in an emergency setting, you are not likely to miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Since Anascorp is given by a healthcare professional in an emergency setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur. If an overdose were to occur the patient is already in a medical setting and the overdose would be treated quickly.

What should I avoid after receiving Anascorp?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Anascorp side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Anascorp: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a fever, swollen glands, muscle pain, joint pain (which may occur up to 2 weeks after the injection is given).

Common Anascorp side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting;

  • fever;

  • rash, itching; or

  • muscle pain where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Anascorp?

Other drugs may interact with Centruroides scorpion antivenom, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use.

More about Anascorp (antivenom (centruroides scorpion))

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Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Anascorp only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.