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Andrachne

Scientific Name(s): Andrachne aspera Spreng., Andrachne cordifolia (Wall. ex Decne.) Müll. Arg., Andrachne phyllanthoides (Nutt.) Muell. Arg.
Common Name(s): Andrachne, Maidenbush

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Aug 1, 2019.

Clinical Overview

Use

One species has been used to treat eye inflammation in Yemen, although there are no clinical trials available to support this use. Other species are used to control pests.

Dosing

There is no clinical evidence to support Andrachne dosage.

Contraindications

Contraindications have not yet been identified.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Avoid use. Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking.

Interactions

None well documented.

Adverse Reactions

Information regarding adverse reactions with the use of this product is limited.

Toxicology

Information is limited. A. cordifolia was shown to be phytotoxic in a study in Pakistan.

Scientific Family

  • Euphorbiaceae (spurges)

Botany

Nomenclature used in literature lacks clarity, and the terms Andrachne and Leptopus are used inconsistently. Geographically, the plants are distinct, with Andrachne found in the Western Hemisphere, Africa, parts of the Arabian Peninsula, the Mediterranean region, and the Asia Minor peninsula, and Leptopus found in Australia, the biogeographical region of Malesia, and China. However, both genera are found in the Caucasus region, Pakistan, and India. The traditional classification of Andrachne has been reconsidered based on recent DNA sequence data.Vorontsova 2007

There are 8 morphologically distinct generic groups, including Andrachne sensu stricto, the Andrachne section Phyllanthopsis (eg, Leptopus phyllanthoides, Andrachne arida), the Andrachne section Pseudophyllanthus (eg, Andrachne ovalis), and Leptopus s.s.USDA 2014, Vorontsova 2007 Synonyms include Leptopus cordifolius, and L. phyllanthoides.

Andrachne species are shrubs and undershrubs that grow in tropical and warm regions. The plants possess many ascending leafy branches with leaves that are oval or obovate, while the flowers are monoecious, pedicellate, and usually solitary in the axils. The fruit is dry, splitting into three 2-valved carpels.Fernald 1950

Chemistry

There is limited information on the chemical constituents of Andrachne. Two bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, cocsuline and pendulin, have been isolated from the roots of A. cordifolia.Khan 1983 Whole plant extract of A. cordifolia taken from the Himalayas revealed the presence of pentacyclic triterpenes.Mukherjee 1986

Uses and Pharmacology

Antimicrobial effects

Animal data

A. cordifolia was shown to possess phytotoxic properties in an in vitro study in Pakistan.Gilani 2010

Clinical data

A. aspera roots are used for treating eye inflammation in Yemen, where pieces of crushed root are placed on the eyelids. Activity against human pathogens has been evaluated in vitro, with low activity demonstrated by methanolic fractions. A chloroform fraction was active against Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Some activity against fungi was demonstrated; however, clinical studies are lacking.Ahmad 2007, Ghazanfur 1994

Dosing

There is no clinical evidence to support Andrachne dosage.

Pregnancy / Lactation

Avoid use. Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking.

Interactions

None well documented.

Adverse Reactions

Information regarding adverse reactions with the use of this product is limited.

Toxicology

Information is limited. A. cordifolia was shown to be phytotoxic in a study in Pakistan.Gilani 2010

References

Ahmad B, Hassan Shah SM, Bashir S, Nisar M, Chaudry MI. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of Andrachne cordifolia Muell. J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2007;22(6):726-729.18237026
Fernald ML. Gray's Manual of Botany. 8th ed. Portland, OR: Dioscorides Press; 1950.
Ghazanfur SA. Handbook of Arabian Medicinal Plants. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1994.
Gilani SA, Fujii Y, Shinwari ZK, Adnan M, Kikuchi A, Watanabe KN. Phytotoxic studies of medicinal plant species of Pakistan. Pak J Bot. 2010;42(2):987-996.
Khan MI, Ikram M, Hussain SF. Bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Andrachne cordifolia. Planta Med. 1983;47(3):191-192.17404912
Leptopus phyllanthoides. USDA, NRCS. 2006. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov, 14 March 2014). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA. Accessed June 23, 2014.
Mukherjee KS, Bhattacharjee P, Mukherjee RK, Ghosh PK. A triterpenoid of Andrachne cordifolia. Phytochemistry.1986;25(11):2669-2670.
Vorontsova MS, Hoffmann P, Maurin O, Chase MW. Molecular phylogenetics of tribe Poranthereae (Phyllanthaceae; Euphorbiaceae sensu lato). Am J Bot. 2007;94(12):2026-2040.21636396

Disclaimer

This information relates to an herbal, vitamin, mineral or other dietary supplement. This product has not been reviewed by the FDA to determine whether it is safe or effective and is not subject to the quality standards and safety information collection standards that are applicable to most prescription drugs. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this product. This information does not endorse this product as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this product. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this product. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You should talk with your health care provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this product.

This product may adversely interact with certain health and medical conditions, other prescription and over-the-counter drugs, foods, or other dietary supplements. This product may be unsafe when used before surgery or other medical procedures. It is important to fully inform your doctor about the herbal, vitamins, mineral or any other supplements you are taking before any kind of surgery or medical procedure. With the exception of certain products that are generally recognized as safe in normal quantities, including use of folic acid and prenatal vitamins during pregnancy, this product has not been sufficiently studied to determine whether it is safe to use during pregnancy or nursing or by persons younger than 2 years of age.

Further information

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