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Triumeq FDA Alerts

The FDA Alert(s) below may be specifically about Triumeq or relate to a group or class of drugs which include Triumeq (abacavir/dolutegravir/lamivudine).

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings. For the latest FDA MedWatch alerts, go here.

Recent FDA Alert(s) for abacavir/dolutegravir/lamivudine

Juluca, Tivicay, Triumeq (dolutegravir): FDA to Evaluate - Potential Risk of Neural Tube Birth Defects

May 18, 2018

Audience: Infectious Disease, Health Professional, Patient

ISSUE: Serious cases of neural tube birth defects involving the brain, spine, and spinal cord have been reported in babies born to women treated with dolutegravir used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Preliminary results from an ongoing observational study in Botswana found that women who received dolutegravir at the time of becoming pregnant or early in the first trimester appear to be at higher risk for these defects.

Neural tube defects are birth defects that can occur early in pregnancy when the spinal cord, brain, and related structures do not form properly. To date, in this observational study there are no reported cases of babies born with neural tube defects to women starting dolutegravir later in pregnancy. We are investigating this new safety issue and will update the public when we have more information.

BACKGROUND: Dolutegravir is an FDA-approved antiretroviral medicine used in combination with other antiretroviral medicines to treat HIV, the virus that can cause acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Dolutegravir works by blocking integrase, an HIV enzyme, to prevent the virus from multiplying and can reduce the amount of HIV in the body. Stopping dolutegravir without first talking to a prescriber can cause the HIV infection to become worse. Approved in 2013, dolutegravir has been on the market for 5 years, and is available as a single ingredient product under the brand name Tivicay and as a fixed dose combination tablet with other HIV medicines under the brand names Juluca and Triumeq.

RECOMMENDATION: Patients should not stop taking dolutegravir without first talking to your health care professional because stopping your medicine can cause the HIV infection to worsen. In addition:

  • If you are already pregnant, stopping your dolutegravir-containing regimen without switching to alternative HIV medicines could cause the amount of virus to increase and spread HIV to your baby.

  • If you take a dolutegravir-containing regimen at the time of becoming pregnant and during the first trimester of pregnancy, there is a risk that your baby may develop neural tube defects. Neural tube defects happen early in pregnancy, before many women even know they are pregnant. For this reason, women of childbearing age should talk to their health care professional about other non-dolutegravir-containing antiretroviral medicines.

  • You should tell your health care professional if you are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant before you start a dolutegravir-containing regimen. Your health care professional may discuss other treatment options with you.

  • Women of childbearing age who decide to take a dolutegravir-containing regimen should consistently use effective birth control (contraception) while on HIV treatment. Women should talk to their health care professionals about an effective birth control method to use while taking a dolutegravir-containing regimen.

  • Before you start a dolutegravir-containing regimen you will need a pregnancy test to determine if you are already pregnant.

Healthcare professionals should inform women of childbearing age about the potential risk of neural tube defects when a dolutegravir-containing regimen is used at the time of conception and early in pregnancy. In addition:

  • Healthcare professionals should weigh the benefits and the risks of dolutegravir when prescribing antiretroviral medicines to women of childbearing age. Alternative antiretroviral medicines should be considered. Discuss the relative risks and benefits of appropriate alternative antiretroviral therapies.

  • If the decision is made to use dolutegravir in women of childbearing age, health care professionals should reinforce the consistent use of effective birth control.

  • Perform pregnancy testing before initiating a dolutegravir-containing regimen in women of childbearing age to exclude pregnancy.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report Online: www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report

  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

[05/18/2018 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

Abacavir - Ongoing Safety Review: Possible Increased Risk of Heart Attack

Mar 1, 2011

Audience: Infectious Disease

including Ziagen, Trizivir, and Epzicom

ISSUE: FDA updated the public about an ongoing safety review of abacavir and a possible increased risk of heart attack. There has been conflicting information on the potential increased risk of heart attack with abacavir treatment. An increased risk of heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) has been seen in several observational studies and one randomized controlled trial (RCT) with abacavir. However, an increased risk of heart attack has not been seen in other RCTs and the safety database maintained by the drug manufacturer.

FDA conducted a meta-analysis of 26 randomized clinical trials that evaluated abacavir. This meta-analysis did not show an increased risk of MI associated with the use of abacavir. FDA will continue to communicate any new safety information to the public as it becomes available.

BACKGROUND: Abacavir is an antiviral medication used in combination with other antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

RECOMMENDATION: Healthcare professionals should continue to prescribe abacavir according to the professional label. Patients should not stop taking their abacavir without first talking to their healthcare professional.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events, side effects, or product quality problems related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

  • Complete and submit the report Online: www.fda.gov/MedWatch/report.htm
  • Download form or call 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form, then complete and return to the address on the pre-addressed form, or submit by fax to 1-800-FDA-0178

 

[03/01/2011 - Drug Safety Communication - FDA]

Ziagen (abacavir) and Videx (didanosine)

Mar 27, 2008

Audience: Infectious disease specialists, other healthcare professionals, patients

[Posted 03/27/2008] The FDA issued an Early Communication about recent findings of The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study. Data analyses from this study indicate a higher risk of heart attack in patients infected with HIV-1 who were taking Ziagen (abacavir) or Videx (didanosine) as part of their drug therapy. The study is a large observational study of 33,347 HIV-1 infected patients living in North America, Europe and Australia. Patients in this study are being followed to evaluate the short and long term adverse effects of treatment with anti-HIV drugs. FDA continues to evaluate the overall risks and benefits of abacavir and didanosine. This evaluation may result in the need to revise labeling for the products. Until the FDA’s review is complete, health care professionals should evaluate the potential risks and benefits of each HIV-1 antiretroviral drug their patients are taking.

This early communication is in keeping with FDA’s commitment to inform the public about its ongoing safety reviews of drugs. As soon as this review is complete, FDA will communicate the conclusions and recommendations to the public.

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