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Drug interactions between acetaminophen / tramadol and Flexeril

Results for the following 2 drugs:
acetaminophen/tramadol
Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine)

Interactions between your drugs

Major

cyclobenzaprine ↔ tramadol

Applies to:Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine) and acetaminophen/tramadol

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

GENERALLY AVOID: Concomitant use of opioids with other central nervous system (CNS) depressants (e.g., benzodiazepines, sedatives/hypnotics, anxiolytics, muscle relaxants, general anesthetics, antipsychotics, other opioids, alcohol) may result in profound sedation, respiratory depression, coma, and death.

MANAGEMENT: The use of opioids in conjunction with other CNS depressants should generally be avoided unless alternative treatment options are inadequate. If coadministration is necessary, the dosage and duration of each drug should be limited to the minimum required to achieve desired clinical effect. Patients should be monitored closely for signs and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation, and advised to avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until they know how these medications affect them.

GENERALLY AVOID: Concomitant use of phenylpiperidine opioids, tapentadol, or tramadol with each other or with other serotonergic agents may potentiate the risk of serotonin syndrome, which is a rare but serious and potentially fatal condition thought to result from hyperstimulation of brainstem 5-HT1A and 2A receptors. Symptoms of the serotonin syndrome may include mental status changes such as irritability, altered consciousness, confusion, hallucination, and coma; autonomic dysfunction such as tachycardia, hyperthermia, diaphoresis, shivering, blood pressure lability, and mydriasis; neuromuscular abnormalities such as hyperreflexia, myoclonus, tremor, rigidity, and ataxia; and gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

MANAGEMENT: In general, the concomitant use of multiple serotonergic agents should be avoided if possible, or otherwise approached with caution if potential benefit is deemed to outweigh the risk. Patients should be closely monitored for symptoms of the serotonin syndrome during treatment. Particular caution is advised when increasing the dosages of these agents. If serotonin syndrome develops or is suspected during the course of therapy, all serotonergic agents should be discontinued immediately and supportive care rendered as necessary. Moderately ill patients may also benefit from the administration of a serotonin antagonist (e.g., cyproheptadine, chlorpromazine). Severe cases should be managed under consultation with a toxicologist and may require sedation, neuromuscular paralysis, intubation, and mechanical ventilation in addition to the other measures.

References

  1. Weiner AL "Meperidine as a potential cause of serotonin syndrome in the emergency department." Acad Emerg Med 6 (1999): 156-8
  2. Gilman AG, Rall TW, Nies AS, Taylor P, eds. "Goodman and Gilman's the Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. 8th ed." New York, NY: Pergamon Press Inc. (1990):
  3. Keegan MT, Brown DR, Rabinstein AA "Serotonin syndrome from the interaction of cyclobenzaprine with other serotoninergic drugs." Anesth Analg 103 (2006): 1466-8
  4. Chan BSH, Graudins A, Whyte IM, Dawson AH, Braitberg G, Duggin GG "Serotonin syndrome resulting from drug interactions." Med J Aust 169 (1998): 523-5
  5. Insel TR, Roy BF, Cohen RM, Murphy DL "Possible development of the serotonin syndrome in man." Am J Psychiatry 139 (1982): 954-5
  6. Boyer EW, Shannon M "The serotonin syndrome." N Engl J Med 352 (2005): 1112-20
  7. Giese SY, Neborsky R "Serotonin syndrome: potential consequences of Meridia combined with Demerol or fentanyl." Plast Reconstr Surg 107 (2001): 293-4
  8. Mills KC "Serotonin syndrome: A clinical update." Crit Care Clin 13 (1997): 763
  9. "Product Information. Ultram (tramadol)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
  10. Martin TG "Serotonin syndrome." Ann Emerg Med 28 (1996): 520-6
  11. "Product Information. Nucynta (tapentadol)." PriCara Pharmaceuticals, Raritan, NJ.
  12. Sternbach H "The serotonin syndrome." Am J Psychiatry 148 (1991): 705-13
  13. Nijhawan PK, Katz G, Winter S "Psychiatric illness and the serotonin syndrome: an emerging adverse drug effect leading to intensive care unit admission." Crit Care Med 24 (1996): 1086-9
  14. US Food and Drug Administration "FDA warns about serious risks and death when combining opioid pain or cough medicines with benzodiazepines; requires its strongest warning. Available from: URL: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM518672.pdf." ([2016, Aug 31]):
  15. Nierenberg DW, Semprebon M "The central nervous system serotonin syndrome." Clin Pharmacol Ther 53 (1993): 84-8
View all 15 references

Drug and food interactions

Moderate

cyclobenzaprine food

Applies to: Flexeril (cyclobenzaprine)

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of cyclobenzaprine such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with cyclobenzaprine. Do not use more than the recommended dose of cyclobenzaprine, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

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Moderate

tramadol food

Applies to: acetaminophen / tramadol

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of traMADol such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with traMADol. Do not use more than the recommended dose of traMADol, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

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Therapeutic duplication warnings

No therapeutic duplications were found for your selected drugs.

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a guideline only. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific patient is difficult to determine using this tool alone given the large number of variables that may apply.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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